Brave – Mark Andrews & Brenda Chapman

2012 4.1, 2.8K Ratings Pixar Animation Studios, the creator of Toy Story 3, whisks you away on an astonishing adventure to an ancient land full of mystery and tradition. Bursting with heart, unforgettable characters and Pixar’s signature humor, Brave is incredible entertainment for the whole family. Take a heroic journey with Merida, a skilled archer and headstrong daughter of King Fergus and Queen Elinor. Determined to carve her own path in life, Merida defies an age-old custom sacred to the unruly and uproarious lords of the land. When Merida’s actions inadvertently unleash chaos in the kingdom, she must harness all of her skills and resources – including her clever and mischievous triplet brothers – to undo a beastly curse before it’s too late, and discover the meaning of true bravery. Rent $2.99 Buy $19.99 View in iTunes Pixar Animation Studios, the creator of Toy Story 3, whisks you away on an astonishing adventure to an ancient land full of mystery and tradition. Bursting with heart, unforgettable characters and Pixar’s signature humor, Brave is incredible entertainment for the whole family. Take a heroic journey with Merida, a skilled archer and headstrong daughter of King Fergus and Queen Elinor. Determined to carve her own path in life, Merida defies an age-old custom sacred to the unruly and uproarious lords of the land. When Merida’s actions inadvertently unleash chaos in the kingdom, she must harness all of her skills and resources – including her clever and mischievous triplet brothers – to undo a beastly curse before it’s too late, and discover the meaning of true bravery. Rent $2.99

Read More…

RuPaul’s Drag Race: 10 Casting Decisions That Hurt All-Stars (And 10 That Saved It)

RuPaul’s Drag Race: 10 Casting Decisions That Hurt All-Stars (And 10 That Saved It) by Bernardo Sim – on Sep 17, 2018 in Lists
Share Tweet Comment Email Copy Link Copied The RuPaul’s Drag Race franchise has introduced many drag queens, Quote: : s, and spin-offs to mainstream audiences. Aside from its complementary series Untucked and the makeover series Drag U , there is All-Stars , which is arguably the most successful spin-off in the history of the franchise.
After three seasons – with a fourth one on its way – RuPaul’s Drag Race: All-Stars has featured 32 queens from past seasons. From “fan-favorite” contestants to dreaded “villains,” the series has thrived on its ability to show different sides from queens we thought we knew, as well as show what they do best once again.
Aside from a small set of queens who will most likely never return to Drag Race , there are over one hundred contestants that the franchise can invite back. With that said, it is fair to say that All-Stars has not always done a great job at vetting which queens are worthy (or capable) of a starry comeback.
Over time, there have definitely been queens that made the All-Stars series what it is. On the other hand, there have been contestants that came back only to hurt themselves and the Drag Race brand as a whole. In the latter cases, it was probably better for them to be remembered for their original seasons, rather than showing audiences who they really are, or at least who they have become.
Not every all-star queen has the charisma, uniqueness, nerve, and talent to be featured on Drag Race ’s Hall of Fame.
These are RuPaul’s Drag Race: 10 Casting Decisions That Hurt All-Stars (And 10 That Saved It) .
advertising 20 HURT: BEBE ZAHARA BENET
BeBe Zahara Benet won the very first season of RuPaul’s Drag Race . “The season with that one filter,” as it is commonly joked among queens and fans of the show.
Despite the fact that RuPaul made a compelling case that BeBe was not widely recognized by many newer Drag Race fans, and thus it made sense for her to be on All-Stars 3 , the general audience was shocked – and confused – by the fact that a winner of the show would come back to compete.
After all, how could she possibly be judged fairly?
This confusion gave enough reason for a massive online conspiracy to surface, which discussed that BeBe Zahara Benet was actually a mole for RuPaul on All-Stars 3 . While that would have been very cool and interesting, it was not actually true. BeBe’s casting opened a precedent for All-Stars that no one asked for.
19 SAVED: BENDELACREME
advertising Coming into All-Stars 3 , the chatter was around Trixie Mattel, Shangela, and Kennedy Davenport as queens who could probably pull off a win. However, as the season began to roll out, it quickly became clear that the season already had a winner: BenDeLaCreme. Out of the six main challenges that she was a part of, Ben won five and was “safe” during the remaining one.
It became clear that there would be no way for BenDeLaCreme to even land on the Bottom Two during the show, if it wasn’t for the fact that the queens decided to eliminate herself from the competition.
Ben was a casting choice that not many fans cared about, but she turned out to save All-Stars 3 from its overall weak performances.
18 HURT: PANDORA BOXX
Pandora Boxx was the fan-favorite queen on the second season of RuPaul’s Drag Race . She charmed the judges and the fans with her wit and humor, which preceded the types of talent that would later grace the show, such as Bianca Del Rio and Bob the Drag Queen. Thus, when it came time for the very first Drag Race: All-Stars , it was a given that Pandora would be featured on the series.
Well, but then came that silly All-Stars 1 rule about the queens competing in teams , which lowered the chances of several contestants to stand on their own.
When Pandora Boxx was eliminated on the very first episode of All-Stars 1 , fans were outraged and expressed the feeling that the queen was mistreated twice by the franchise rather than being given a proper platform.
17 SAVED: KATYA
There is no doubt that Katya is among the most talented and beloved queens in the history of RuPaul’s Drag Race . Thus, when it came time for All-Stars 2 , producers were very correct to cast Katya.
While many fans were betting on Alaska to win All-Stars 2 , there was a feeling that Katya deserved to enter the franchise’s Hall of Fame. During the season, she shone as a queen and made everyone laugh with her shenanigans, once again being a dark horse in the competition.
In the end, Alaska did win All-Stars 2 , but Katya went home with the elusive street cred of “the one who could have won.” In the Drag Race world, losing is sometimes a great thing.
16 HURT: MIMI IMFURST
Mimi Imfurst was immortalized in the Drag Race mythos for literally lifting her fellow contestant India Ferrah and carried her over her shoulders during “lip sync for your life.” Not only did that justify Mimi being eliminated, but it also yielded an entire rule-change of the franchise. Now, for the most part, the queens are no longer allowed to touch each other during a lip sync.
It is fairly safe to say that Mimi Imfurst was cast in All-Stars 1 for being so remembered for a single dramatic moment.
However, one may argue that she had no reason to redeem herself, nor anything else new to show the audiences. In the end, Mimi was faulted for dragging down her teammate, Pandora Boxx, to be eliminated in the first episode of the series.
15 SAVED: JUJUBEE
advertising One of the rare highlights of All-Stars 1 was Jujubee, a fan-favorite queen that audiences craved to see more of. Her first appearance, on season 2 of Drag Race , was marked by controversies and great TV moments. When it came time to cast that season, it made perfect sense for Jujubee to be involved.
Indeed, Jujubee was responsible for some of the very few good moments of All-Stars 1 , which is often referred to as the very worst season of Drag Race in history. In the All-Stars season, Jujubee placed third, behind only Raven and Chad Michaels, who had been pinned to win from the very start.
All in all, Jujubee saved All-Stars 1 from being even more disappointing.
14 HURT: CHI CHI DEVAYNE
The entire storyline of Chi Chi DeVayne on season 8 of Drag Race was that, unlike other queens, she did not have a high budget to buy clothes. Nor did she have the connections to borrow expensive gowns from designers and bring to the series. Despite all of those elements, Chi Chi fought her way to the Top 4 of the eighth season, placing only behind Bob the Drag Queen, Kim Chi, and Naomi Smalls.
It made perfect sense to cast Chi Chi DeVayne on All-Stars 3 . As expected, the queen came in promising that now, with money and influence, she was going to be able to do all of the things she couldn’t better. Except that didn’t happen.
Chi Chi failed to capitalize on her “glow up.”
What’s more, even her winning personality was not the same as we remembered.
Featured Today
9 Villain Castings Decisions That Hurt The Arrowverse (And 11 That Saved It)

Read More…

5 questions after reading the Rod Rosenstein bombshell report – CNNPolitics

(CNN) The New York Times published an explosive report Friday afternoon , claiming, via anonymous sources, that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein openly speculated about wearing a wire to record President Donald Trump and floated the idea of building support within the administration to invoke the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office.
Like I said, it’s explosive. Rosenstein denied the report in broad terms. Here’s his full statement: “The New York Times’s story is inaccurate and factually incorrect. I will not further comment on a story based on anonymous sources who are obviously biased against the department and are advancing their own personal agenda. But let me be clear about this: Based on my personal dealings with the president, there is no basis to invoke the 25th Amendment.” For his part, Trump has said nothing — yet — about the report. The President is traveling in the West, having held a campaign rally for Nevada Sen. Dean Heller (R) on Thursday night in Las Vegas and he has another one Friday night in Springfield, Missouri, for Republican Senate candidate Josh Hawley. (He almost certainly will, of course, and I’ll update this when he does.) Read More The Times report and Rosenstein’s denial raise all sorts of questions. Here are five big ones I have after reading it: 1. Who leaked this? The sourcing as described by the Times says only this about its sourcing for the piece: “Several people described the episodes, insisting on anonymity to discuss internal deliberations. The people were briefed either on the events themselves or on memos written by F.B.I. officials, including Andrew G. McCabe, then the acting bureau director, that documented Mr. Rosenstein’s actions and comments.” THE POINT — NOW ON YOUTUBE!
In each episode of his weekly YouTube show, Chris Cillizza will delve a little deeper into the surreal world of politics. Click to subscribe!
That leaves lots and lots of room for speculation — most of which will center on the McCabe memos, which apparently the Times’ reporters have. “He has no knowledge of how any member of the media obtained those memos,” McCabe’s lawyer told the Times. That attorney also confirmed that special counsel Robert Mueller’s office had been given copies of all memos written by McCabe documenting conversations with senior FBI brass in the days and weeks after James Comey was fired as FBI director by Trump in the spring of 2017. Who gave the memos to the Times? McCabe, a regular target of Trump’s ire who was fired after an internal review suggested he had acted inappropriately in his conduct during a probe into the Clinton Foundation, has said — through his lawyer — it wasn’t him. It could be someone on Mueller’s team. But why would they leak memos that would make it more likely Rosenstein, who oversees the special counsel probe and has been supportive of the effort, would be fired? Given all of that, there’s also the possibility that someone within the White House leaked the McCabe memos as a way to lay the groundwork for firing Rosenstein and replacing him with someone less favorably inclined to the Mueller investigation. (Attorney General Jeff Sessions recused himself from the probe last year due to his close ties to Trump during the 2016 campaign.) 2. Was Rosenstein joking? In the Times piece, there’s a testimonial from a Justice Department official who was there when Rosenstein made the comment about wearing a wire and insists the remark was made sarcastically. That may well be the way Rosenstein — and his allies — try to wriggle out of this; it was all a misunderstood joke! Of course, these lines from the Times report suggest that may be easier said than done: “According to the others who described his comments, Mr. Rosenstein not only confirmed that he was serious about the idea but also followed up by suggesting that other F.B.I. officials who were interviewing to be the bureau’s director could also secretly record Mr. Trump.” One man’s sarcasm could be another man’s seriousness, I suppose, but this seems like an awfully well-sourced story for it to be premised on nothing more than a misunderstanding about Rosenstein’s sense of humor (or lack thereof). 3. Why didn’t Rosenstein follow through on the wire or the 25th Amendment talk? If Rosenstein was concerned enough about Trump and how he was conducting himself in office that he proposed the potential candidate to be FBI director wear a wire when sitting for job interviews with Trump, why was there no follow-up? If you were that worried about the President compromising the independence and integrity of the Justice Department (and the country), wouldn’t you consider other methods — even if people shot down the wear-a-wire one? Ditto the 25th Amendment. If Rosenstein was concerned enough about Trump’s fitness for office that he had put thought into what Cabinet officials might join his effort (Sessions and then-Department of Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly were the apparent targets) then why did Rosenstein simply drop any sort of effort to expose or correct Trump’s issue in office? It seems like a pretty damn big thing to just, well, drop. 4. Why is Rosenstein’s denial of the 25th Amendment stuff in the present tense? Rosenstein had no option — unless he wanted to resign or be fired immediately — but to issue a denial of the Times story. But, the denial is broad enough as to be somewhat meaningless. Rosenstein never says, specifically, what the Times piece gets wrong and what the real story is. In fact, the only detail in the Rosenstein statement is this one: “Based on my personal dealings with the president, there is no basis to invoke the 25th Amendment.” There ” is ” no basis to invoke the 25th Amendment. If Rosenstein never mentioned the idea of the 25th Amendment, why not say something like: “There has never been and is not now any reason to invoke the 25th Amendment.” Not doing that suggests Rosenstein at least weighed the possibility — even if it never wound up going anywhere. 5. Is Rosenstein the author of the anonymous New York Times op-ed? The op-ed , published earlier this month, makes the case that there is an active effort within the Trump administration to subvert the President’s worst instincts in order to keep the country safe. The attribution of the op-ed, which roiled the political world and drove Trump into a tizzy, was only a “senior Trump administration official.” Which, of course, could describe Rosenstein (as well as lots and lots of other people too!). Donald Trump Jr., the President’s eldest son, made clear in a tweet Friday that he believes Rosenstein was the anonymous author. “We likely have a winner in the search for ‘anonymous,'” wrote Trump Jr . “Anything to subvert a president who is actually getting things done for America… for a change.” Clearly conscious of the fact that the op-ed would be on the mind of anyone reading the Rosenstein news story, the two authors of the Times piece on Rosenstein included this line about the anonymous writer: “That person’s identity is unknown to journalists in the Times news department.” Which, of course, doesn’t rule out that Rosenstein wrote it. Just that the two authors don’t know who wrote the piece. There are, obviously, plenty more questions. And, it’s hard to imagine that there will be no further reverberations from this story over the coming hours and days as official Washington processes it. That shaking-up process may well answer some of the questions above but will almost certainly create other new ones. What a story.

Read More…