People Are Coming Up With The Most Annoying Things That Would Be A Living Hell To Deal With Everyday

Not your original work? Add source Humor me for a second; you haven’t lived your life good enough to enter heaven and you weren’t bad enough to be sent to hell. You were a little naughty, though. Where would you spend eternity? In Heck, of course! Haven’t heard of it? It’s an imaginary minor version of hell that the internet has come up with, and they’re competing to see who can ‘implement’ the most appropriate torture there. While going through their entries, however, some of them seem so cruel, even Satan is probably taking notes. From watching movies that have the music twice as loud as the dialogue to not being able to fit the USB into your computer no matter how many times you flip it, scroll down to check out why you definitely wouldn’t want to end up in this place! Show Full Text

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Photo essay on library patrons in New York.

Comment The Seward Park Library on the Lower East Side of Manhattan is where I met Andrew Fairweather, a librarian whose impassioned plea on behalf of libraries gave me the title for my book about social infrastructure. “There’s a term you don’t hear these days,” Fairweather told me, “one you used to hear all the time when the Carnegie branches opened: ‘palaces for the people.’ The library really is a palace. It bestows nobility on people who can’t otherwise afford a shred of it.” Seward Park was just one of the libraries I visited while writing my book Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight Inequality, Polarization, and the Decline of Civic Life , which includes a section on the many roles that libraries play in American society. These photos were taken by Joey O’Loughlin at the library between Aug. 30 and Sept. 7, 2018. Joey O’Loughlin Morning Routine Neighbors start to gather on this bench an hour or more before the Seward Park Library’s 10 a.m. opening. Some come early to take advantage of the free Wi-Fi, which they can access if they’re close to the building. Others are there to get first dibs on foreign language newspapers, to get heat or air conditioning, or to use the restroom. Peter Chen and his daughters, Nora, 9, and Angela, 5, wait patiently, reading the papers and snacking. Peter is a teacher who currently lives in Taiwan, while the girls stay in New York City with their mother. When Peter visits, he spends hours at the library, tutoring the girls to make sure their skills are to his standards. Joey O’Loughlin Opening Librarian Michael Messina unlocks the door and welcomes the first patrons. Libraries are open to everyone, regardless of age, ability, or citizenship status. While other local establishments, such as cafes and diners, ask people to pay for access to a shared gathering place, libraries are “free for all.” They’re founded on a principle that’s out of sync with our contemporary ethos: that everyone, by virtue of their humanity, deserves access to our shared cultural heritage. Joey O’Loughlin Story Time For children, morning classes in the library involve singing, dancing, and storytelling in three languages: English, Mandarin, and Spanish. The classes give children and caretakers with different backgrounds a regular occasion to spend time together. When they end, small groups of friends often continue their play in the main children’s area or on the playground outside. Joey O’Loughlin Window Seat The window seats are always occupied. Susan Raggio reads the latest New Yorker magazine. She lives in the neighborhood and is a regular visitor, as are dozens of older people who, were it not for the library, might well wind up staying home alone. Joey O’Loughlin First Library Card Samiyah Pointer, first-grader at Manhattan Charter School, just got her first library card. For Samiyah and countless other children, the library card is the first badge of responsibility and step toward independence. Starting on this day, she’ll choose which books to bring home, and she’ll soon learn that being part of a community means returning them in good condition so that other children can read them too. Joey O’Loughlin Karaoke Seward Park is one of many New York Public Library branches that offer karaoke sessions. They are especially popular with older Asian and Asian American patrons, some of whom travel together from branch to branch to sing as often as possible. Here some regular participants wait for their turn to perform. Joey O’Loughlin Sanctuary Not everyone goes to the library for social connection. Nicole Cheung, 30 years old, lives with roommates in the crowded Lower East Side. She goes to the library for the reasons Andrew Carnegie, who funded construction of the Seward Park Library and 2,800 other libraries around the world, originally supported them: to enjoy a quiet space, privacy, and time to read and reflect. The soaring windows in the Carnegie-era building provide ample light and bring the magnificent trees of Seward Park into the reading rooms. Joey O’Loughlin Social Life With Screens Dozens of kids spend their summer days at the library while their parents work. They read, play board games, do crafts, and play on computers. Parents and grandparents check in and out through the day, sometimes in person, sometimes by phone. The kids at Seward Park are remarkably well-behaved, but some librarians worry they need supervision that the library cannot provide. Joey O’Loughlin Braiding Li Quin Li has just learned how to do sophisticated braiding, and she’s practicing on her daughter, Xiao Xiao Chan, and her daughter’s friend, Xinping Xu, while they read and play. The girls, both 7, spend many summer hours together at the library. Their mothers and grandparents share caregiving responsibilities. Joey O’Loughlin Some feel that bubbles at Story Time inspire lifelong devotion to libraries. Joey O’Loughlin Respite Melanie Berrios Billilo browses cookbooks while her kids Francesca and Zachary manage the livestock. Melanie, a freelance tech designer for the fashion industry, has been bringing her children here since they were small. It’s more occasional now, as a stop along the way after school pickup or, on a day like today, when the library offers a cool, peaceful place in unbearably hot weather. Joey O’Loughlin Knitting The knitters gather every Friday afternoon. All are welcome, even those who crochet. The more experienced teach the newcomers; younger and older participants collaborate with humor and grace. Here, Ellen Chen (in a cap) offers Joan Frier (with gray hair) some friendly advice. Joey O’Loughlin Teen Time Officially, librarian Samantha Jackson is the young adult information specialist. More than that, she offers thoughtful attention to hundreds of teens who spend long hours in the branch. Samantha has developed strong relationships with teenagers who seek her out for book recommendations and other advice. She’s also the resident manga and anime aficionado. Joey O’Loughlin Making Memories Librarian Andrew Fairweather is in charge of building an archive of neighborhood history and culture to preserve memories in one of the fastest-changing neighborhoods in New York. He also organizes other activities at the library, including a regular Tea Time. “Tea Time is one of the best ways that the library can express faith in people,” Fairweather told me. “People need to have nobility and dignity in their lives. And you know, they need other people to recognize it in them too. Serving tea doesn’t seem like that big a deal, but the truth is it’s one of the most important things I do.”

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Candlestick Point opening campsites (bring a warm blanket)

Published 10:06 am PDT, Friday, September 21, 2018
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018.
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018. Photo: Brian Baer / California State Parks
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018.
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018. Photo: Brian Baer / California State Parks
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018.
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018. Photo: Brian Baer / California State Parks
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018.
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018. Photo: Brian Baer / California State Parks window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({ mode: ‘thumbnails-c’, container: ‘taboola-interstitial-gallery-thumbnails-5’, placement: ‘Interstitial Gallery Thumbnails 5’, target_type: ‘mix’ }); _taboola.push({flush: true});
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018.
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018. Photo: Brian Baer / California State Parks
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018.
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018. Photo: Brian Baer / California State Parks
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018.
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018. Photo: Brian Baer / California State Parks
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018.
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018. Photo: Brian Baer / California State Parks window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({ mode: ‘thumbnails-c’, container: ‘taboola-interstitial-gallery-thumbnails-10’, placement: ‘Interstitial Gallery Thumbnails 10’, target_type: ‘mix’ }); _taboola.push({flush: true});
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018.
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018. Photo: Brian Baer / California State Parks
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018.
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018. Photo: Brian Baer / California State Parks Cow Mountain Recreation Area Get stunning views of Clear Lake at Cow Mountain Recreation Area near Ukiah. The area includes over 13 wildlife reservoirs and 120 miles of vehicle trails for ATVs and other off-highway vehicles. To get more off the grid, try campgrounds like Goat Rock where there are 17 miles of foot trails. less Cow Mountain Recreation Area Get stunning views of Clear Lake at Cow Mountain Recreation Area near Ukiah. The area includes over 13 wildlife reservoirs and 120 miles of vehicle trails for ATVs and other Photo: Sarah Rice, Special To The Chronicle Steiner Flat Primitive Campground Steiner Flat Primitive Campground is an ideal spot for hikers looking to explore the Shasta-Trinity National Forest (seen here). It offers eight tent sites that can accommodate small trailers. There are vault toilets but no potable water. less Steiner Flat Primitive Campground Steiner Flat Primitive Campground is an ideal spot for hikers looking to explore the Shasta-Trinity National Forest (seen here). It offers eight tent sites that can accommodate … more Photo: Tom Stienstra, Tom Stienstra / The Chronicle window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({ mode: ‘thumbnails-c’, container: ‘taboola-interstitial-gallery-thumbnails-15’, placement: ‘Interstitial Gallery Thumbnails 15’, target_type: ‘mix’ }); _taboola.push({flush: true}); Laguna Mountain
I f you like waterfalls, Laguna Mountain Recreation Area has a series of waterfalls accessible by hiking trails. Camping facilities are new and feature fire rings, picnic benches and vault toilets. No reservations are required although there is a 14-day camping limit within any 28-day period. less Laguna Mountain
I f you like waterfalls, Laguna Mountain Recreation Area has a series of waterfalls accessible by hiking trails. Camping facilities are new and feature fire rings, picnic benches and vault Photo: Bureau Of Land Management Cedar Roughs Wilderness Area If you want to enjoy Lake Berryessa for free, the adjacent Cedar Roughs Wilderness Area is the economical answer. Boat-in access from the lake is available past Pope Creek bridge. A jeep trail off Pope Canyon Road offers access to hiking and camping. There are no developed campgrounds so be prepared to pack out what you pack in. less Cedar Roughs Wilderness Area If you want to enjoy Lake Berryessa for free, the adjacent Cedar Roughs Wilderness Area is the economical answer. Boat-in access from the lake is available past Pope Creek Photo: Andy Murdock, Special To The Chronicle Forks of Butte Creek Want to get really authentic? Pretend you’re a Forty Niner at Forks of Butte Creek , where you can pan for gold. There are no toilets or potable water at the site so bring everything you need and take everything you brought. Forks of Butte Creek is open from May to November. less Forks of Butte Creek Want to get really authentic? Pretend you’re a Forty Niner at Forks of Butte Creek , where you can pan for gold. There are no toilets or potable water at the site so bring everything Photo: Kurt Rogers, The Chronicle Massacre Ranch Cabin This one is technically across the border in Nevada, but it’s too good not to include. You’ll have to have a certain sense of humor to appreciate the cabin at Massacre Ranch near Modoc County . The cabin is available first-come, first-serve and has a wood stove and electrical outlets (you provide the generator). The BLM recommends the region for its hunting, hiking and “ample opportunity for solitude.” Don’t plan on moving there to escape Bay Area rents though; it’s only available for 14 days maximum. less Massacre Ranch Cabin This one is technically across the border in Nevada, but it’s too good not to include. You’ll have to have a certain sense of humor to appreciate the cabin at Massacre Ranch near Modoc Photo: Bureau Of Land Management window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({ mode: ‘thumbnails-c’, container: ‘taboola-interstitial-gallery-thumbnails-20’, placement: ‘Interstitial Gallery Thumbnails 20’, target_type: ‘mix’ }); _taboola.push({flush: true}); Williams Hill The Monterey County site is known for its vistas of Salinas Valley and also offers biking, horseback riding and star-gazing. Williams Hill has designated campsites with vault toilets and also dispersed camping. less Williams Hill The Monterey County site is known for its vistas of Salinas Valley and also offers biking, horseback riding and star-gazing. Williams Hill has designated campsites with vault toilets and also Photo: Bureau Of Land Management Carrizo Plain National Monument Get up close to the San Andreas Fault, which runs through and helped shape Carrizo Plain National Monument , less than two hours from San Luis Obispo. For brief periods, the plain blooms wild with flowers. The area also contains hundreds of cultural sites, including 10,000-year-old Native American campsites and Painted Rock, a sandstone formation with ancient pictographs. less Carrizo Plain National Monument Get up close to the San Andreas Fault, which runs through and helped shape Carrizo Plain National Monument , less than two hours from San Luis Obispo. For brief periods, the Photo: Scott Haefner, Associated Press Indian Valley/Walker Ridge Indian Valley is a good spot if you’re looking for hunting. The hills are home to blacktail deer, quail, doves and wild turkeys. Fishers can enjoy salmon, bass and rainbow trout at Indian Valley Reservoir . Blue Oaks Camp has six campsites with fire pits and vault toilets. Kowalski Camp has no facilities and is hike-in or boat-in access only, if you’re looking for a more remote experience. less Indian Valley/Walker Ridge Indian Valley is a good spot if you’re looking for hunting. The hills are home to blacktail deer, quail, doves and wild turkeys. Fishers can enjoy salmon, bass and rainbow trout at Photo: Marcia Wright, Wikimedia Commons window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({ mode: ‘thumbnails-c’, container: ‘taboola-interstitial-gallery-thumbnails-24’, placement: ‘Interstitial Gallery Thumbnails 24’, target_type: ‘mix’ }); _taboola.push({flush: true}); Photo: Brian Baer / California State Parks Image 1 of / 24 Close Image 1 of 24
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018.
On the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay, Candlestick Point State Recreation Area offers hiking, kayaking, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching, and now camping. Six campsites will open Oct. 1, 2018. Photo: Brian Baer / California State Parks Candlestick Point opening campsites (bring a warm blanket) 1 / 24 Back to Gallery
Candlestick Park may be gone, but San Francisco 49ers and Giants fans haven’t forgotten how they shivered in the cold at the windswept former stadium.
In fact, when baseball games went extra innings, fans who stayed received a special pin for braving the frigid weather. The Croix de Candlestick pins carried the motto, “Veni, vidi, vixi” — “I came, I saw, I survived.”
Now California is inviting folks to pitch a tent and camp out at one of six designated sites opening Oct. 1 at Candlestick Point Recreation Area.
But don’t let Candlestick’s bone-chilling reputation scare you off from this oasis of nature within the city, says Patrick Marley Rump, executive director of the local nonprofit Literacy for Environmental Justice that helped build the sites with the help of a grant and California State Parks. Recommended Video:
Have an epic camping experience with this new modular detachable tent system. Media: PopularMechanics
“Candlestick is more than a stadium,” Rump says. “It’s also a 3.2-mile shoreline park.”
The sites are located on what’s known as Sunset Point in a protected cove that receives less wind than other parts of the peninsula.
“These sites are pretty well sheltered and the best time of year to be out there is fall and winter,” he says. “Having said that, there are going to be some days when it’s windy out there.”
ALSO, Outdoor mini golf right here in SF? Yes, and with food trucks and a beer garden
Candlestick Point State Recreation Area lies on the western shoreline of San Francisco Bay just south of where the stadium once stood. It received state park status in 1977.
The park offers an escape from the city’s hustle and bustle with hiking trails, fishing, windsurfing, bird watching and now camping.
The new sites are a quarter-mile from the parking lot and campers need to hike or bike in, or they can also access the area by landing a kayak at Jack Rabbit Beach. Rump says it’s one of the few spots where you can camp along the Bay Area Water Trail , a network of boat launching and landing sites around the bay.
The sites can be reserved for one to two nights and up to four people. Bathrooms with flush toilets are located near the sites; campfires aren’t allowed. It costs $35 per night to camp.
Adeline Yee, a state parks spokesperson, attended a ribbon-cutting for the new campsites on Thursday—a day that proved the weather here can be gorgeous.
“It was hot,” says Yee. “There was no wind hardly.”
The project also involved making other updates to the park such as widening trails to make them ADA accessible and adding new interpretive signs explaining the history and ecology of the area. Most Popular

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