lol
This is a weird question. Humor is relative. I like to make banter and dry humor jokes. The people who like those as well think I’m funny. The people who don’t, don’t get the jokes and don’t find it funny.
“Good sense of humor” is a double edged sword. It lets you take things in stride, but it also causes some people to go to far with you because they think you’ll be chill about everything.

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maybe college is when i understood my humor
i’m just really snarky and deadpan
so low-budget april ludgate

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Annihilation

Annihilation – Alex Garland (USA, 2018)
4 out of 5 – Good
Natalie Portman is Lena, a young doctor and military veteran who is trying to restart her life after her husband, Kane, is declared missing in action, presumed dead. As she begins the symbolic practice of redecorating, her husband (Jason Isaacs) shows up. Only now he’s emotionally distant and doesn’t seem to remember where he’s been this whole time. When Kane collapses bleeding, they rush to the hospital, only to have the ambulance commandeered by that universal sign of shady-government ops, the black SUV. Portman awakes to find herself in a secret military hospital next to an extra-terrestrial event known as “the shimmer”. What is the shimmer? No-one knows, but Kane is the only man to have ever returned from it. Things take their natural course, and Portman soon finds herself a part of the next expedition to enter the shimmer.
This film is a bit of a curiosity as its the first film (that I’m aware of anyway) made by one of the big studios but moved to Netflix when they deemed it too complicated for a modern cinema audience. If that isn’t an insult, I’m not sure what is. That said, although part of me is sad I never got to see some of the visuals here on the big screen, I am very relieved the whole experience was not tempered by some bored asshole checking their mobile phone. The film is certainly more complicated than most American made science fiction these days but then that is a low bar. Ultimately though the film is more perplexing than complicated, as one remains very much in the dark as to what the whole point of it is.
Where the film succeeds, is that it can rely on its strengths, as these are deployed masterfully. Garland does enough with the plot and the world he creates within the shimmer to generate enough wonder and tension within the viewer that ultimately you won’t mind too much that none of the film’s questions are answered. Its the simple things done well and such tools remain incredibly effective. Just as the title cards get closer and closer together in The Shining, things within the shimmer get weirder and more dangerous the closer our heroes get to its centre.
How much you like this film will be very much dependent on how tolerant you are of the sheer-seriousness with which Garland has handled affairs. Try to imagine if his terrific first outing, Ex Machina was stripped of its sexuality and what little humor it had. Personally, I didn’t have a problem with it, at this point any science-fiction film that doesn’t feature superheroes giving strained, “witty” asides to each other whilst they knock-out anonymous henchmen gets a free pass from me. This is mature film-making from Garland, a film that is filled with inventive touches and on more than one occasion approaches brilliance. Where it falls short, is that one remains in the dark as to what exactly the whole point of the experience is. The film is based on the first book of a trilogy, perhaps the answer is in one of sequels.

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