20 ’90s Sitcoms Fans Completely Forgot About | ScreenRant

20 ’90s Sitcoms Fans Completely Forgot About by Sergio Pereira – on Sep 09, 2018 in Lists
Share Tweet Comment Email Copy Link Copied If you’re a fan of comedy, the ’90s supplied us with the best sitcoms. It wasn’t just one or two programs that were great, but we were blessed with a plethora of laugh-out-loud characters and wacky storylines.
Whether it was growing up with Joey, Phoebe, Rachel, Ross, Chandler and Monica from Friends or singing along to the catchy theme song of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air , many shows still live on in popular culture and the hearts of fans everywhere.
But why was this era of comedy TV so successful? Jennifer Aniston joked to the Huffington Post that Friends probably wouldn’t be successful in modern times. “If Friends was created today, you would have a coffee shop full of people that were just staring into iPhones. There would be no actual episodes or conversations,” she said.
The truth is, she could be right. So many ’90s comedies were built on the premise of close relationships and people interacting with one another.
Now, real-life communication is almost a lost art. As a result, it’s unlikely we’ll ever get another wave of high-quality sitcoms like we did back in the day.
We have two choices here, though: either mourn or celebrate the period. The latter sounds like the happier and fun option to do, and there are a ton of forgotten series to revisit.
Also, thanks to the various streaming platforms and services, we can catch up on old episodes of these shows on demand and anywhere.
So, with that said, let’s look at these 20 ’90s Sitcoms Fans Completely Forgot About .
advertising 20 100 Deeds For Eddie McDowd
In late 1999, a heartwarming sitcom called 100 Deeds for Eddie McDowd premiered.
The story was simple: A schoolyard bully named Eddie McDowd meets The Drifter who turns him into a dog to punish him for his wrongdoings. In order to turn back into a human, he needs to complete 100 good deeds for others.
The show aired for three seasons, with Seth Green providing the voice of Eddie in the first season.
Unfortunately, a decline in ratings led to its cancelation, with Eddie still stuck as a dog and numerous deeds to complete.
100 Deeds for Eddie McDowd struck the right balance between heart and humor, and it deserved a longer run than what it got.
19 Caroline In The City
advertising If you’re a fan of Friends , Caroline in the City is right down your alley (there was even a crossover at one point).
Set in New York, it follows the adventures of cartoonist Caroline Duffy and her friends as they navigate love, life, and everything in between.
It started off with a bang, even if it was scheduled between Seinfeld and ER . After some time, though, critics said it was only popular because the people caught it while surfing for the other two shows. Proving the critics wrong, it moved slots and still survived.
Unfortunately, the ratings dropped, as did the quality, and Caroline in the City was axed four seasons and 97 episodes later.
18 Brotherly Love
In the ’90s, the Lawrence brothers were all the rage. The three actors were to TV what Hanson ended up being to music: A talented novelty with a short lifespan. Their starring vehicle came in 1995’s Brotherly Love .
For the large part, the show was funny as it played on the three brothers’ different dynamics.
Andrew Lawrence certainly brought most of the slapstick humor, but it was the deeper stories featuring his older brother, Joey, that kept us invested.
Much like Full House , Brotherly Love was all about family and learning to rely on them when needed. It only lasted two seasons, but it did find a whole new audience when it was syndicated years later.
17 Home Improvement
At the time of its airing, Home Improvement dominated its various slots and viewer habits. It was a critically acclaimed and fan-loved series. Yet, we never hear it mentioned in the same breath as other shows such as Seinfeld .
Nonetheless, those who experienced Tim Allen and his madcap family’s escapades were all the richer for it.
Richard Karn, who portrayed Al Borland on the show, thinks it went out too early, but he understands why.
“Tim wanted to do other things and at that point it was also when Michael Jordan was leaving the NBA. Jordan made a big thing about wanting to go out on top and Home Improvement was the number one show on ABC when we left,” he told news.com.au .
16 Dinosaurs
Whether you choose to except it or not, Dinosaurs was the pinnacle of creativity. It was a sitcom that featured puppet dinosaurs as they lived like human beings in 60,000,003 BC.
The late, great Jim Henson had worked on the show for a few years, but he unfortunately passed away before it aired.
There was simply nothing else quite like it. It combined the best of The Simpsons with the tongue-in-cheek aspects of The Flintstones , yet it wasn’t afraid to tackle serious world issues, either.
The show lasted four seasons, with the finale it deserved. It depicted how the dinosaurs actually died, with its own twist of course. If you’ve never seen Dinosaurs , it needs to be added to your must-watch list right now.
15 Sister, Sister
advertising Before The Suite Life of Zack and Cody , there were two other twins dominating TV: Tia and Tamera Mowry.
The premise of Sister, Sister was pretty much the same as any production involving twins: separated at birth but reunited later in life. It’s like that meme of Spider-Man pointing at himself.
Despite the tired trope, Sister, Sister provided a host of laughs as the Mowry sisters showcased their comedic talents and flair for the dramatic.
They often got themselves into hare-brained situations; however, their sense of loyalty to each other would always bail them out of trouble.
The show aired for a lengthy six seasons and continues to find an audience through its reruns today. There’s talk of a revival being on the way, too.
14 The Hughleys
It isn’t unusual to see comedians receive their own sitcoms. After all, they should be the type of performers that networks are looking for in the first place.
In 1998, D.L. Hughley starred in The Hughleys . The premise involved Hughley moving his family from the inner city to suburban Los Angeles.
The laughs were aplenty and the show featured numerous guest stars, such as Tyra Banks and Kelly Rowland.
The Hughleys was actually cancelled on ABC after the network revamped its TGIF line-up, but quickly found a new home on UPN.
Unfortunately, it only lasted four seasons before ending on a massive cliffhanger that infuriated fans. Maybe one day we’ll find out how the Hughley family is getting along.
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No Wonder the GOP Doesn’t Want Mark Judge to Testify

WASTED No Wonder the GOP Doesn’t Want Mark Judge to Testify The man who intended to be a character witness for Kavanaugh has become a liability for his friend. 09.24.18 7:54 PM ET Photo Illustration by Lyne Lucien/The Daily Beast
The conservative writer Mark Judge found himself in the spotlight this month when Christine Blasey Ford alleged that he’d helped Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh try to sexually assault her while they were all in high school in the 1980s.
But Judge has been keeping a low profile. “How’d you find me?” he asked a Washington Post reporter who found him holed up at a house in a Delaware beach town.
It’s no wonder he left town. In the last couple of weeks, an ex-girlfriend has branded him a liar , a pitbull lawyer has hinted at more sexual misconduct , and his history of sexist and questionable writings has been picked apart.
Judge, who has denied being part of any sexual assault, has declined to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee about the Kavanaugh allegations—and the Republicans on the committee aren’t eager to have him appear either.
So who is the man that Democrats would love to grill but the GOP is happy to keep away from the hearings? In a series of memoirs and articles, Judge has passed himself off as a kind of modern-day Augustine: a Catholic who found faith later in life and is regretful—but not too much—of a youth spent in drunken sexual debauchery.
Some of those writings and some people from his past have now come back to haunt him.
Judge has written two memoirs that touch on his experience as a teenage alcoholic at Georgetown Prep, Wasted: Tales of a GenX Drunk and God and Man at Georgetown Prep . The picture Judge paints of his youth in the privileged environs of northwest Washington DC is booze-soaked, sex-filled and consequence-free.
He writes about hiring a stripper for a party and embarking on a quest to make it through 100 kegs before he finished high school. In Wasted, Judge references a character named “ Bart O’Kavanaugh ” having a blackout and vomiting at a high school party. “I can’t stand by watch him lie.” — Mark Judge’s ex-girlfriend
Judge recalls his escapades as mostly harmless mischief. But now he’s the target of darker allegations.
Elizabeth Rasor, a college girlfriend of Judge, told the The New Yorker that he had confessed to embarrassment at having group sex with an inebriated woman alongside a number of other boys. “I can’t stand by and watch him lie,” Rasor told the magazine.
Judge, through an attorney, said he “categorically denies” the allegation.
The pages of his high school yearbook contain a snippet that advertised views on women that would resurface in later writings—a quote from Noel Coward that read, “Certain women should be struck regularly, like gongs.”
Although Judge eventually got sober, he didn’t lose his adolescent humor.
In 2014, he posted a Craigslist ad seeking a “bikini model reading conservative pamphlets in a hotel room.” The project, purportedly on behalf of The Daily Caller, was designed to satirize “Fox News babes” and “the feminist discomfort with a woman with God-given sex appeal and curves (nature is not politically correct).” The Daily Caller denied any involvement and Judge, a sometime Caller contributor, later outed himself as the author.
As a writer and pundit, Judge focused on the nexus of popular culture, politics, and sex with frequent riffs against feminism and liberal politics and in favor of Catholic traditionalism.
Judge railed against what he called a “ lavender mafia ” of gay priests who supposedly undermined Catholic orthodoxy on sex, and laid the blame for the church’s child sexual abuse scandals at their feet. He praised Pope John Paul II’s more conservative 1979 “Theology of the Body” as a healthier ideology of human sexuality for the church.
Sexual consent, and the absence of it, would also crop up as a theme in his writing. “What women wear and their body language also send signals about their sexuality.” — Mark Judge
In a 2013 piece for Acculturated.com, Judge wrote about the ambiguities of women’s sexual consent in a piece that has raised eyebrows in light of the allegations against him. “There’s never any excuse to rape, a crime that I think is almost akin to murder because the rapist kills a part of the human soul. And yet what women wear and their body language also send signals about their sexuality, he wrote. While women who dress modestly are clearly not interested in male attention, “women who dress like prostitutes are also sending out signals,” Judge claimed, adding that “the signal is not that they should be raped.”
In a 2015 ode to pulp detective fiction for Splice Today , he writes about the existence of an “ambiguous middle ground” between receiving explicit sexual consent from a woman and hearing “no” from her. In those circumstances, he writes, “if that man is any kind of man, he’ll allow himself to feel the awesome power, the wonderful beauty, of uncontrollable male passion.”
In a 1996 piece for the City Paper, “ Bitch Hunt ,” Judge was quoted as criticizing the Washington dating scene while jokingly bragging of having gone on 800 dates that year. “Women’s self-esteem is so low that they need to build themselves up by knocking others down,” he said of metro-area single women. “You can see this at any bar in the city. It’s like, pay attention to me. OK, now I hate you.”
Judge’s name first surfaced during Kavanaugh’s nomination when Ford alleged that he had been a participant in the attempted rape she described in a confidential letter to Sen. Dianne Feinstein. “He is being hounded. He is a recovering alcoholic and is under unbelievable stress.”
The letter , now published by the Senate Judiciary Committee, alleges Kavanaugh had “the assistance of his close friend, Mark G. Judge” who “periodically jumped onto Kavanaugh” during the incident and yelled “go for it” and “stop” as Kavanaugh allegedly held Ford down and tried to pull off her bathing suit.
Judge claims it’s a fiction.
“It’s just absolutely nuts. I never saw Brett act that way,” he told The Weekly Standard when the allegations first surfaced.
Both Senate Democrats and Ford’s attorneys have asked that the Judiciary Committee subpoena him to testify about alleged incident. But Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) has said there’s “no reason to” subpoena Judge and that “he’s already said what he’s going to say”—a reference to a terse letter from Judge’s attorney saying his client “no memory of this alleged incident.”
The Washington Post reported Monday night that Judge’s attorney, Barbara Van Gelder, told him to leave Washington once the Kavanaugh hearing date was set and he was not on the witness list.
She said he is having trouble coping with all the attention.
“He is being hounded. He is a recovering alcoholic and is under unbelievable stress,” she said. “He needed for his own health to get out of this toxic environment and take care of himself.”

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Disney’s Haunted Mansion Housewares Collection Will Make You The Spookiest Host On The Block

an hour ago shopDisney
If you’ve been trying to figure out how to get a little Disneyana into your Halloween décor and haven’t yet come up with an acceptable solution, good news: Disney has a whole Haunted Mansion houseware collection that’s chock full of everything you need to turn your very own home into the spitting image of Gracey Manor . From a set of grim, grinning bookends to a ceramic plate bearing Madame Leota’s likeness, this line of goods is everything your goth little soul never knew it wanted.
The very first incarnation of the now classic Disney dark ride known as the Haunted Mansion officially opened in the New Orleans Square section of Disneyland in 1969 after more than a decade of planning and construction. It then made its way to the East Coast as one of the Magic Kingdom’s opening day attractions at Walt Disney World in 1971 — and despite its seemingly incompatible mix of humor and fearsomeness, it has gone on to become one of the most beloved theme park attractions of all time. Although a few scenes — namely the Attic — have undergone a few light revisions over the years, the overall tenor of the ride and the loose storyline it follows have gone relatively unchanged throughout the many long decades of its existence; after all, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, right?
Haunted Mansion merch has always been some of the most entertainingly-themed mech you can get at the Disney parks — but happily, much of it is available online now through the shopDisney site. And hey, wouldn’t you know it? That includes tons of items from Disney’s Haunted Mansion collection . In addition to the housewares, there are also plenty of wardrobe items and accessories — but, I mean, let’s face it: I’ll take a faithful reproduction of the Mansion’s grandfather clock over a t-shirt any day of the week.
Check out some of the best pieces below: 1. The Haunted Mansion Dish Towel Set

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