Now You Can Scare The Crap Out Of Someone With A Clown And Donuts

Boo, bitches! 🎈 Is there anything creepier than a big-ass clown unexpectedly knocking at your door? Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF New Line Cinema That’s exactly what Hurts Donut was counting on when they thought of their latest marketing concept that’s straight out of a horror film, but with a sweet twist. Hurts Donut / Via Facebook: HurtsHTX You see, Hurts Donut will be offering “Scary Clown” deliveries just in time for Halloween in Katy, Texas. View this post on Facebook facebook.com
Yep. This will either be somebody’s worst nightmare, or one of the most memorable experiences of their lives.
Needless to say, everyone is talking about this super creepy promotion just in time for Halloween. Joe King @jauxking @ElisaRockDoc @drewlinskii But here we have Hurt’s which will have a creepy clown deliver the donuts around Halloween. What’s not to love? https://t.co/lOdeKxJN57
01:01 AM – 11 Jul 2018 Reply Retweet Favorite They’re even delivering to schools! momo @MorganScandrett my sister just paid a clown to come to my school & chase me through the halls & delivered me hurts donuts. I have never ran so fast. 😭🤡
03:35 PM – 10 Oct 2017 Reply Retweet Favorite I mean, you can’t argue with this reaction. NWA Democrat-Gazette @nwademgaz Fayetteville’s Hurts Donut Co. delivers donuts, with a catch. A Scary Clown! https://t.co/9Yof5oxdEV
08:53 PM – 02 Oct 2017 Reply Retweet Favorite Those with a twisted sense of humor will now have this option for both tricks and treats. Hurts Donut Company / Via youtube.com People can also enter to win a dozen donuts complete with scary clown delivery.
What a “treat.” Tap to play GIF Tap to play GIF Top trending videos Facebook Twitter Copy Copy link Watch more BuzzFeed Video Caret right Top trending videos Watch more BuzzFeed Video Caret right Watch more BuzzFeed Video Caret right Top trending videos Facebook Share Twitter Tweet Copy Copy link Watch more BuzzFeed Video Caret right

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North Dakota woman’s Halloween decoration freaks out neighbors, prompts police response | Fox News

Becky Muhs’ “Help Me” decoration proved to be just a bit too scary for the neighbors. (Becky Muhs)
Becky Muhs gave her neighborhood a big scare after putting up the first of this year’s Halloween decorations, but probably not in the way she intended.
Muhs, of West Fargo, N.D., hung a decoration in her window that made it appear as if someone had scrawled the words “Help Me” in blood from inside the house, prompting her neighbors to frantically attempt to reach her, and even call the police, WDAY reports.
Unfortunately, Muhs wasn’t home to allay anyone’s fears, as she and her husband — whose anniversary falls on Halloween, too — were out celebrating an early birthday dinner.
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“I look across the street and I see in my neighbor’s window, the sign that says ‘Help Me,’” said WDAY radio host Jay Thomas, who just happens to live nearby. “That window has always had the curtains drawn. So I’m like, ‘What’s going on in here?'”
Thomas, spotting a police car, then ran down the street to alert the officer, but ended up calling 911 after he was waved away.
“To my defense, there were no other Halloween decorations out there,” he said.
Muhs, who says Halloween is her favorite holiday, has since added more decorations to the outside of her home. (Becky Muhs)
He also tried contacting Muhs, who eventually responded 15 minutes later to confirm she was safe.
Police also got in touch with Muhs and her husband, but told them this kind of thing isn’t completely out of the ordinary.
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Muhs and Thomas, meanwhile, have come around to seeing the humor in the incident.
“It’s any Halloween lover’s dream come true to get that kind of reaction to decorations,” she tells Fox News. “And honestly it’s very reassuring to know the we have such good neighbors looking out for us … even if it might have made him look a little silly, it was all in good fun.”
“We are still giggling here,” she added.
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News of Muhs’ concerning decoration follows a similar incident from 2017, during which residents of a Tennessee county repeatedly called the police to report what appeared to be a grisly accident — specifically, a man being decapitated by his garage door — only to be told it was a just a Halloween decoration .
Police in Greene County, Tenn., also needed to warn the public not to call to report a gruesome decoration back in 2017. (Greene County Sheriff’s Department)
“Do NOT call 911 reporting a dead body,” police told neighbors. “Instead, congratulate the homeowner on a great display.”

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Flannery O’Connor Renders Her Verdict on Ayn Rand’s Fiction: It’s As “Low As You Can Get”

in Literature , Writing | September 26th, 2018 1 Comment 1.5k
For all the grotesque humor of her stories and novels, Flannery O’Connor took the writing of fiction as seriously as it is possible to do. Even at the age of 18, she saw the task as a divine calling, writing in her journal , “I feel that God has made my life empty in this respect so that I may fill it some wonderful way.” Intense self-doubt also made her fear that she would fail in her mission, a too-familiar feeling for every creative writer: “I may grovel the rest of my life in a stew of effort, of misguided hope.”
In acquiring the needed confidence to push through fear, O’Connor also acquired a theory of fiction—a serious and demanding one that left no room for frivolous entertainments or propaganda. “I know well enough that very few people who are interested in writing are interested in writing well,” she told a student audience in her lecture “ The Nature and Aim of Fiction ” (collected in Mystery and Manners ).
Writing well, for O’Connor, meant pursuing “the habit of art,” a phrase she took from French Catholic philosopher Jacques Maritain . While she admits that Art is “a word that immediately scares people off, as being a little too grand,” her definition is simple enough, if vague: “something that is valuable in itself and that works in itself.” When she gets into the meat of these ideas, we see why she could be so harsh a critic of fellow writers in her many letters to friends and acquaintances.
In one particularly harsh assessment in a May, 1960 letter to playwright Maryat Lee , O’Connor wrote , “I hope you don’t have friends who recommend Ayn Rand to you. The fiction of Ayn Rand is as low as you can get re fiction. I hope you picked it up off the floor of the subway and threw it in the nearest garbage pail. She makes Mickey Spillane look like Dostoevsky.”
The reference to Spillane is interesting. Rand corresponded with the crime novelist and admired his work, seeming “greatly pleased,” William Thomas writes at the Randian Atlas Society , by his “sense of life,” if not “enamored of his skill in conveying it.” Surely Rand’s hyper-individualistic, purely materialist “sense of life” repelled O’Connor, but her objections to Rand’s fiction would have certainly—if not primarily—extended to the writing itself.
In her lecture, O’Connor elaborates on her definition of the art of fiction by telling her audience what it is not:
I find that most people know what a story is until they sit down to write one. Then they find themselves writing a sketch with an essay woven through it, or an essay with a sketch woven through it, or an editorial with a character in it, or a case history with a moral, or some other mongrel thing.
Rand’s fiction presents readers with speechifying heroes who serve as one-dimensional exponents of Objectivism, and cardboard villains acting as straw caricatures of the democratic or socialist philosophies she loathed. Books like Atlas Shrugged embody all the marks of amateurism, according to O’Connor, of writers who “are conscious of problems, not of people, of questions and issues, not of the texture of existence, of case histories and everything that has a sociological smack, instead of with all those concrete details of life that make actual the mystery of our position on earth.”
For O’Connor, the habit of art requires keen observation of complex human behavior, compassion for human failings, a genuine openness to paradox and the unknown, and a preference for idiosyncratic specificity over grand abstractions and stereotypes—qualities Rand simply did not possess. Perhaps most importantly, however, as O’Connor told her student audience in “The Nature and Aim of Fiction,” the writer’s “moral sense must coincide with his dramatic sense.” One imagines O’Connor felt that Rand’s moral sense could only produce profoundly impoverished drama.
Read more of O’Connor’s letters, full of her informal literary criticism, in the collection The Habit of Being: The Letters of Flannery O’Connor .
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