‘Guardians Of The Galaxy’ Fans Have Started A Go Fund Me For Rehire James Gunn Billboards

Search ‘Guardians Of The Galaxy’ Fans Have Started A Go Fund Me For Rehire James Gunn Billboards By Nicole Drum 0
Guardians of the Galaxy fans haven’t given up on trying to get writer/director James Gunn rehired in order to finish out his trilogy. Now, in addition to petitions and other support, they’re looking to take out a billboard as well.
A group calling itself “Guardians Family” has set up a GoFundMe account to raise $2000 so that they can take out a billboard (or more than one) to encourage Disney to rehire Gunn. They plan for these billboards to be placed outside Disney’s theme parks in Florida and California near the holidays to “maximize exposure”. As of this writing, they have raised $1395 of their goal.
Gunn was fired from Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 after years-old tweets surfaced that featured coarse humor, including jokes about rape, pedophilia, and the September 11 terrorist attacks. Made years before Guardians of the Galaxy , most of the tweets had already been discussed when Marvel hired Gunn. He had previously apologized for the comments and acknowledged that they were in poor taste.
Those jokes, and some previously unexplored, were used against Gunn as part of a campaign to get him fired after he ran afoul of right-wing activists on Twitter led by one of the primary “Pizzagate” conspiracy theorists. Gunn reiterated his position that the jokes were inappropriate and apologized again, but said that they represented immature attempts at being “edgy” and were not representative of the person he is now.
The next day, Disney fired Gunn, saying that “The offensive attitudes and statements discovered on James’ Twitter feed are indefensible and inconsistent with our studio’s values and we have severed our business relationship with him.” The movie, which was expected to being production soon, has been put on an indefinite hold while the studio assesses what to do next. 0 comments
This billboard campaign joins a fan petition that recently crossed the 400,000 signature mark on Change.org. While the organizer of that campaign, Chandler Edwards, acknowledges that the petition likely won’t change anything, the billboard campaign appears to truly seek to make some change. Right now, the future of the Guardians of the Galaxy franchise is in question as some fans would rather see no movie than a movie without Gunn, though Disney is said to be using Gunn’s completed script for the film.
What do you think about this campaign? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

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Steak-Umm’s Viral Twitter Thread Is A Mic Drop On Anyone Criticizing Millennials

Images via Steak-umm / Twitter We didn’t know Steak-umm was the voice of the millennial generation, but OK
In the social media age, a lot of brands have large followings online because of the way they interact with those followers, i.e. their potential customers. Wendy’s is known for making hilariously sarcastic jokes about its followers. Taco Bell also interacts with fans online with humor and wit. And while some people don’t understand this practice, Steak-umm, a brand of reheatable frozen beef sandwich meat, just explained it all while also explaining everything that makes it difficult to be a millennial in one mic-drop of a Twitter thread.
“why are so many young people flocking to brands on social media for love, guidance, and attention?” it begins. “I’ll tell you why.” why are so many young people flocking to brands on social media for love, guidance, and attention? I’ll tell you why. they’re isolated from real communities, working service jobs they hate while barely making ends meat, and are living w/ unchecked personal/mental health problems
— Steak-umm (@steak_umm) September 26, 2018 they’re crushed by student loan debt, disenfranchised by past generations, and are dreading the future of our world every day from mass media addiction and the struggle to not just be happy, but to survive this chaotic time with every problem happening at once under a microscope — Steak-umm (@steak_umm) September 26, 2018 they grew up through the dawn of internet culture and have had mass advertising drilled into their media consumption, now they’re being resold their childhoods by remakes, sequels, spinoffs, and other cheap nostalgia, making them more cynical to growth or authenticity — Steak-umm (@steak_umm) September 26, 2018 they often don’t have parents to talk to because they say stuff like “you don’t know how good you have it,” and they don’t have mentors to talk to because most of them have no concept for growing up in this strange time, which perpetuates the feeling of helplessness/loneliness — Steak-umm (@steak_umm) September 26, 2018 they have full access to social media and the information highway, but they feel more alone and insecure than ever. being behind a screen 24/7 has made them numb to everything, anxious and depressed about everything, and vitriolic or closed off toward anyone different from them — Steak-umm (@steak_umm) September 26, 2018 young people today have it the best and the worst. there’s so much to process and very few trusted, accessible outlets to process it all through. so they go to memes. they go to obscure or absurdist humor. they go to frozen meat companies on twitter. end rantSteak-umm bless — Steak-umm (@steak_umm) September 26, 2018
And it did. It told us why. Steak-umm just perfectly laid it out there for us all to read. Millennials struggle to find community or meaning when they work freelance or gig jobs with little security or upward mobility. They’re crushed by student loan debt and facing a world that feels hopeless all the time. Frightening headlines come at them 24-7 on social media through mobile devices. And so many people refuse to acknowledge that millennials might have it kind of rough, because they’ve been brainwashed by the bootstrap mentalities of their own generations. In reality, the American dream is a whole lot harder to achieve today than it was a generation ago, because inflation, the recession and widening income inequality have made class mobility all but a thing of the past. Advertisement
And to add to all the weirdness, it’s Steak-umm that’s telling us all this. It’s surreal and strange, and also kind of fitting that all this truth is coming from a frozen beef brand.
And with a bunch of meat-related puns, no less. Sure, we’ll wait while you scroll back up to try to find them.
People (probably mostly millennials) have been cheering Steak-umm on for this, because we could all use a little more truth in this crazy world. Steak/Umm 2020? — Sleeping Giants (@slpng_giants) September 26, 2018 Wow, good timing. I really needed to hear that today. Comparing my self-worth to my peers who all have higher paying jobs, less dysfunctional families, more friends. It’s maddening. I need reminders like this every once in a while just so I don’t go crazy. Thank you.

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‘Smoke Signals’ Film’s Effect 25 Years Later Topic of Discussion

Tumblr CREDIT: Courtesy of Sundance Film Festival
The late 1990s were a goldmine for independent cinema, with financiers and distributors willing to gamble on diverse material in the wake of “Pulp Fiction’s” breakout success earlier that decade. “ Smoke Signals ,” marketed by Miramax as “the first feature film written, directed, and produced by Native Americans,” was a critical success and crowd favorite from its debut at the Sundance Film Festival in 1998, winning the Filmmaker’s Trophy for director Chris Eyre and the Audience Award there before its theatrical release that summer. Two decades years later, it’s not hard to see why “Smoke Signals” resonated: The movie is filled with humor, heart and genuine affection for its characters, hitting notes of sadness, introspection and well-earned catharsis.
“I get caught up in the emotional process of forgiveness, and I think that’s why the movie resonated and has endured,” Eyre says. “We brought a great sense of magical realism to the story, and it all comes together in the end.”
To salute the film, the Pechanga Resort & Casino in Temecula, Calif., will hold a 20th anniversary cast screening Sept. 26. The National Indian Gaming Assn., Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians and Imagine This are sponsoring. Related The Current Dialogue About Diversity is Welcome, But Woefully Incomplete
“‘Smoke Signals’ is an important movie for Indian Country, and to see these beautifully nuanced Native American characters on the big screen was a revelation for us,” says Victor Rocha, conference chair of the National Indian Gaming Assn. “Not only could we be the stewards of our own stories, but it proved we could make great movies.”
Sherman Alexie, who grew up on the Spokane Indian Reservation, adapted his short story “The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven” into the screenplay, focusing on Native American culture, while also crafting an inclusive, entertaining and dramatically potent piece of storytelling. “In the mid-’90s, our life’s mission was to make features, and over four years we got the film accomplished,” recalls Eyre, who credits the Sundance Institute as being crucial to the film’s success. “Sundance cultivates voices and the film was born out of their labs. It wouldn’t have been possible without their support.”
Alexie has recently has been at the center of sexual misconduct charges, and is not expected to attend the event.
The movie’s road-trip narrative centers on two long-time best friends, portrayed by actors Adam Beach and Evan Adams, who are very different as human beings and yet share some deep-rooted similarities. An event in their past jumpstarts a journey of personal discovery, allowing them to step outside their comfort zones in an effort to learn more about themselves.
“‘Smoke Signals’ was an outlet for me to deal with my own parents’ deaths from when I was a child,” says Beach, who plays the character Victor to Adams’ Thomas. “During that traumatic end-scene, I wasn’t really acting. Chris had to snap me out of that moment because it was so intensely personal, and as an actor, it broke down that barrier in terms of giving a truthful screen performance.”
The strong supporting cast helped to define the entire film. “I’m so proud of all of the performances, and I have so many wonderful memories from the production,” says Adams, who adds that they “aimed to show true authenticity about life on the reservation.”
Irene Bedrad, who plays a key role as a friend of Victor’s father, says when she initially read the script, she would have “walked to Los Angeles to get the part.” Tantoo Cardinal and Elaine Miles peppered the film with spirited character work, and Cardinal says “seeing the film again on the big screen should be fun and I can’t wait for people to experience the love we brought to the project.” While Miles says, “the universal nature of the story allows everyone to relate to it one way or another. It’s a special film.”
But what’s dispiriting to note is that there wasn’t a big boom of Native-American filmmakers who got their chance to tell their stories after “Smoke Signals” helped to pave the way. “The follow-up was very shallow in Hollywood,” laments Eyre, who adds that “audiences deserve the Native American ‘Black Panther.’”
But as time marches forward, the film continues to find champions. Martin Scorsese recently added “Smoke Signals” to his Film Foundation course curriculum, and a boutique home entertainment label like would be wise in snagging “Smoke Signals” for its library, as it’s yet to receive the “special edition” treatment. “That would be wonderful,” says Eyre. “The film deserves to live long into the future.”

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