GOP Congressman Shares Vile Meme About Christine Blasey Ford

The verified Facebook page for Republican Congressman Steve King’s re-election campaign posted a vile meme this week disparaging , the research psychologist who has accused Brett Kavanaugh of attempting to rape her in the 1980s.
The meme, posted to King’s Facebook page on Wednesday, features a photo of Blasey wearing sunglasses. An edited version of the image next to it depicts Blasey with the sunglasses removed, revealing her to actually be Hillary Clinton, the 2016 Democratic presidential candidate.
“I KNEW IT!” reads the accompanying text. “ah-HA!!! ,” King’s campaign wrote as the caption.
Screenshot The meme appears to baselessly imply that Blasey’s very serious allegation of sexual assault — which she addressed in heartbreaking testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday — is part of some elaborate left-wing conspiracy.
Blasey made a credible accusation that when she was 15, a 17-year-old Kavanaugh pinned her to a bed and attempted to take off her clothes. She says when she tried to scream, Kavanaugh put his hand over her mouth. She told senators that Kavanuagh and his friend Mark Judge laughed during the attack before she managed to get away — a laughter that she says has haunted her all her life. In her testimony Thursday, which was watched by millions across America, she said the incident left her traumatized.
Kavanaugh denies it occurred.
King is an eight-term congressman from Iowa best known for being a bigot and a white supremacist . His congressional office did not immediately respond to a request for comment on whether it was irresponsible for a congressman to be sharing memes demeaning a survivor of sexual assault.
The person or persons behind his campaign’s official Facebook page, however, responded quickly, and flippantly, to HuffPost questions. You can read the whole exchange below:
HuffPost : Do you think this is an appropriate meme for a congressional campaign to be sharing? Considering it’s about an allegation of sexual assault?
Steve King’s campaign: The humor of that meme is pointed at the absurdity of the Left, nothing more. Our page content is definitely not for people who struggle to have a sense of humor or irony. That being said, we’re definitely not going to litigate every meme with you.
HuffPost : OK, thank you. How is it pointing out the absurdity of the left? (Not going to litigate every meme. Only interested in this one right now!)
Steve King’s campaign : Lol c’mon man…it’s obviously alluding to the Left manipulating the opposition against Kavanaugh’s nomination.
HuffPost : Hhmm, ok. I see it as implying that the left completely cooked up Dr. Ford’s accusation? I know you like dank memes and all, but seems kinda shitty to post about someone alleging she was sexually assaulted, yea?
Steve King’s campaign : Just a suggestion: you might be taking things a bit too literal… Just sayin. And we already explained the meaning of the meme, which you can either choose to believe or not
HuffPost : hhmm ok, wasn’t taking it too literally. Was just saying it’s kinda shitty/insensitive to post about a sexual assault victim. Especially from the verified FB page of a candidate for Congress? But it’s just lulz I guess, right?
Steve King’s campaign : Again, the meme was pointed at the absurdity of the Left. If you choose to not believe us or just misunderstand memes completely, that’s your prerogative. The fact that the Left doesn’t understand memes is in itself a meme, ironically.
Steve King’s campaign proceeds to share a couple of “The Left Can’t Meme” memes.
HuffPost: Yea I’m familiar with the left can’t meme thing! Very clever good for you.
King’s campaign has also shared other crass memes on Facebook belittling the sexual assault allegation against Kavanaugh.
Two out of three sexual assaults in America go unreported to police. It’s common for sexual assault survivors to not speak out about their assaults until years or even decades later.
Screenshot Screenshot King has won his last few elections by over 20 percentage points. A recent poll shows him only 6 points ahead of his Democratic opponent, J.D. Scholten, ahead of the Nov. 6 midterm election.
Need help? Visit RAINN’s National Sexual Assault Online Hotline or the National Sexual Violence Resource Center’s website .

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Got Kidney Stones? A Roller-Coaster Ride May Help

Got Kidney Stones? A Roller-Coaster Ride May Help 0 You can skip this video in seconds Skip Ad Visit the Mercola Video Library Story at-a-glance – Believe it or not, both anecdotal information as well as research performed at Walt Disney World suggests a roller-coaster ride can hasten the passage of small kidney stones A 2018 Ig® Nobel Prize, a spoof award given for unusual or trivial scientific research, was awarded to honors research completed at Michigan State University (MSU) proving smaller kidney stones can be released after a moderate-intensity roller-coaster ride, especially if you are seated in the rear While the research may seem promising, be advised it did not involve human clinical trials but, rather, was based on anecdotal information and data gathered using a 3D silicon kidney model filled with urine and kidney stones In case you are not a fan of roller coasters, I also share helpful information about kidney health and the types and formation of kidney stones, as well as suggestions on how you can prevent and treat them naturally
By Dr. Mercola
Can a roller-coaster ride hasten the passage of kidney stones? While the pairing of an agonizingly painful health condition with an amusement ride may seem too outlandish to believe, research out of Michigan State University (MSU) has been recognized with a 2018 Ig® Nobel Prize for showing that it’s possible. 1
Keep in mind the Ig (for ignoble) is a spoof of the real Nobel Prize. Since 1991, it has been awarded every fall at a ceremony held at Harvard University. Organized by the scientific humor magazine The Annals of Improbable Research, the Ig acknowledges 10 unusual or trivial scientific research projects that “[make] people laugh and then think.” 2
Lest you assume human clinical trials were used to demonstrate the potential of roller coasters to facilitate the passing of kidney stones, you should know the outcomes were based only on anecdotal evidence and experiments with a silicon model.
Now that the Ig award has shed some light on an unusual treatment for kidney stones, let’s take a closer look at how these stones form and what you can do more practically to prevent and treat them. Spoof Nobel Prize Awarded for Using Roller Coasters to Bust up Kidney Stones
As discussed in the featured video, researchers from MSU teamed up to prove that fast-paced, looping roller coaster rides can be useful to help dislodge kidney stones. Their results, published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association in 2016, 3 validate the effectiveness of a roller-coaster ride to ease the passage of small kidney stones through a silicon urinary tract.
In a pilot study, Dr. David Wartinger, Professor Emeritus in MSU’s department of osteopathic surgical specialties, used a backpack to transport a validated, synthetic 3D model of a hollow kidney on the Big Thunder Mountain Railroad roller coaster at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida. The model, which was held at kidney level, contained urine and a number of kidney stones.
He analyzed 20 rides using variables such as kidney stone volume, the silicone model’s placement on the roller coaster and the frequency of simulated stone passage. After partnering with Dr. Marc Mitchell, urologist with The Doctors Clinic in Poulsbo, Washington, Wartinger went on to analyze 60 roller coaster rides involving various kidney models.
They discovered sitting in the back of the coaster yielded the best passage rates, with 23 of 36 stones being successfully expelled. They also concluded stones located in the upper chamber of the kidney showed a 100 percent passage rate. About their research, Wartinger said: 4
“In all, we used 174 kidney stones of varying shapes, sizes and weights to see if each model worked on the same ride and on two other roller coasters. Big Thunder Mountain was the only one that worked. We tried Space Mountain and Aerosmith’s Rock ‘n’ Roller Coaster and both failed.” What’s the Best Type of Roller-Coaster Ride to Release Kidney Stones?
Based on his experience with different types of roller coasters, Wartinger told MSU Today that “some roller coaster rides are too fast and too violent with a G-force that pins the stone into the kidney and doesn’t allow it to pass.”
The ideal ride, he noted, is “rough and quick with some twists and turns.” 5 The best results were realized when riding a moderate-intensity roller coaster that did not involve any upside down or inverted movements.
Wartinger, who has since retired from MSU, does not think the research will extend to human trials because no one has expressed interest in continuing the work. 6
Interestingly, the idea to pursue this research came about after a number of patients treated by the researchers reported passing kidney stones spontaneously after riding the same roller coaster in Disney’s Magic Kingdom. About this anecdotal evidence, Mitchell and Wartinger stated: 7
“The number of stone passages was sufficient to raise suspicions of a possible link between riding a roller coaster and passing [kidney stones]. One patient reported passing [kidney stones] after each of three consecutive rides on the roller coaster.
Many patients reported passing [kidney stones] within hours of leaving the amusement park, and all of them rode the same rollercoaster during their visit.”
Based on his experience with different sizes of stones, Wartinger told Newsweek the benefits of roller coaster rides might apply only to small stones (up to 0.5 centimeters in diameter). 8 Riding a roller coaster may not be beneficial for everyone with a kidney stone.
“You need to heed the warnings before going on a roller coaster,” Wartinger advised. “If you have a kidney stone, but are otherwise healthy and meet the requirements of the ride, patients should try it. It’s definitely a lower-cost alternative to health care.” 9
Another option, Wartinger says, is to take annual maintenance rides to reduce your chance of future issues. Roller coaster rides might also be beneficial to flush out remnants that are sometimes left behind after lithotripsy — a procedure used to break apart kidney stones deemed too large to pass naturally.
“The problem though is lithotripsy can leave remnants in the kidney which can result in another stone,” Wartinger said. “The best way to potentially eliminate this from happening is to try going on a roller coaster after a treatment when the remnants are still small.” 10 Important Facts About Your Kidneys
Because your kidneys are only about the size of your fist and are safely tucked inside your body in your lower back, you may not pay much attention to them. That said, these bean-shaped organs are vital to your well-being and they stay plenty busy around the clock. According to the National Kidney Foundation, your kidneys have five top jobs, including: 11 Balancing your pH levels — Your kidneys help maintain a healthy balance of the chemicals that control your body’s acid levels by either removing or adjusting acid levels and buffering agents Controlling your blood pressure — Because your kidneys need pressure to work properly, they play a role in raising or lowering your blood pressure through fluid levels and the making of a hormone that causes your blood vessels to constrict Keeping your bones healthy — Your kidneys make an active form of vitamin D and also balance your calcium and phosphorus levels, which are necessary to make your bones strong Making red blood cells — A hormone called erythropoietin is made by your kidneys and it tells your bone marrow to make red blood cells, which carry oxygen from your lungs to supply your body’s energy needs Removing wastes and extra fluid — Your kidneys filter about 200 quarts of blood daily that results in about 1 to 2 quarts of urine (containing extra fluid and waste products), which is sent to your bladder for removal from your body What Are Kidney Stones?
Kidney stones (renal calculi) are hard deposits made of chemicals, minerals and salts that form inside your kidneys. They are just one of several conditions known to contribute to chronic kidney disease. Your kidneys are also affected by diabetes and high blood pressure, as well as by congenital or genetic conditions like polycystic kidney disease.
Most often, kidney stones result when your urine contains too little liquid and too much waste. Stones can begin as crystals, which in turn attract other elements to create a solid object that will continue to increase in size unless it is passed out of your body in urine. A few of the kidney stone-forming chemicals in your body are: calcium , cystine, oxalate, phosphate, urate and xanthine. 12
Once formed, a stone may remain in your kidney or travel down your urinary tract into your ureter. Smaller stones may pass out of your body in urine without too much pain. Bigger stones that do not move often cause a backup of urine in your kidney, ureter, bladder or urethra, which can be extremely painful. With respect to kidney stones, the National Kidney Foundation estimates: 13 More than half a million people visit the emergency room annually for issues related to kidney stones The average person has a 10 percent chance of experiencing a kidney stone in his/her lifetime The lifetime risk of having a stone is roughly 19 percent in men and 9 percent in women In men, the first episode often occurs after age 30, but could be earlier Diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity may increase your risk of kidney stones Symptoms of a Kidney Stone
The sizes and shapes of kidney stones vary as much as the people who have them. Some are as small as a grain of sand, while others are pebble size. In rare cases, kidney stones can be as large as a golf ball! When stones are too large to pass, doctors act to remove the stones or break them into smaller pieces that potentially can be passed out of your body.
As you may imagine, the larger the stone, the more noticeable your symptoms and the greater the likelihood of pain, which some have suggested can be as intense as childbirth. You can recognize a kidney stone according to the following symptoms: 14
Blood in your urine

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Political Cartoons – Political Humor, Jokes and Pictures

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