George Carlin Is Getting The Biopic Treatment From An Oscar-Nominated Screenwriter

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On his 1972 album Class Clown , legendary comedian George Carlin listed the seven words you can never say on television: sh*t, piss, f*ck, c*nt, c*cksucker, motherf*cker, and t*ts. (These are also the seven words, save “piss,” you can’t spell without asterisks.) But the cinema is still international waters when it comes to profanity — anything goes, baby! — and you’ll presumably hear those seven dirty words, and a whole lot more, in the upcoming George Carlin biopic.
The project will be penned by Oscar-nominated screenwriter Stan Chervin ( Moneyball ) and, according to Variety , “traditional theatrical, streaming, or a possible television release” are being considered. “We are honored to tell the story of one of the most important and influential comedians of all time, and to do so alongside those who knew him best,” producers Gail Berman and Joe Earley said in a statement. “In addition to shaping comedy and culture for decades, and entertaining generations of audiences, Carlin’s battle to protect free speech continues to impact our daily lives and is as relevant as ever.”
Carlin was as prolific as he was acidic in his standup, having appeared on The Tonight Show over 130 times, recorded 23 comedy albums, filmed 14 HBO comedy specials, and written three New York Times best-sellers. He won a Grammy in 2001 for spoken comedy album, for Brain Droppings , and also received the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. He died in 2008 at age 71. ( Via )
It’s unknown at this time who will play Carlin, but let’s go with, oh, Nic Cage .

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Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse gets three more characters — including a spider-pig

Flipboard A new trailer for Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse has arrived in anticipation of New York Comic Con 2018, and with it our first look at three new spider-powered cast members: Spider-Man Noir, SP//dr and, of course, Spider-Ham. The three were revealed at San Diego Comic-Con 2018 in July, but this is first time anybody outside of Hall H has seen the characters, each of which has his or her own slightly different animation style. Spider-Ham and SP//dr are nearly flat, the better to reference their respective Tex Avery and anime-inspired looks, while Spider-Man Noir is entirely black-and-white and lit in stark contrast. But who are these folks? Glad you asked. The three new characters’ histories and origins help form the deep and continually experimenting Spider-Man universe that has entertained fans for more than half a century. Sony Pictures Animation Spider-Ham Voiced by: John Mulaney ( Saturday Night Live ) Spider-Ham is, in fact, the oldest of the these characters and the one with the longest solo series in comic books. He first appeared in 1983’s Marvel Tails #1 and later got his own book, Peter Porker, the Spectacular Spider-Ham, a 17-issue run under Marvel’s Star Comics imprint in the middle 1980s. Peter Porker is from a parallel Marvel earth (called “Larval Earth,” canonically called Earth-8311). He began life, actually, as a spider! Then he was bitten by a radioactive anthropomorphic pig, becoming an anthropomorphic pig with spider powers, or vice versa, we’re not sure. Porker/Ham was the centerpiece of a goofy run of humor comics that included Captain Americat, Hulk Bunny, The X-Bugs, Thrr, Dog of Thunder, and the Fantastic Fur battling Ducktor Doom, Magsquito, Galactypus and others. Spider-Ham most recently appeared in Marvel’s Lockjaw miniseries , when it was revealed that one of Lockjaw’s long-lost siblings had grown up into an anthropomorphic dog in Larval Earth. Sony Pictures Animation Spider-Man Noir Voiced by: Nicolas Cage ( Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance ) Spider-Man Noir takes his namesake from the Marvel Noir Universe, an interconnected setting running from 2009 to 2010 that featured alternate versions of Marvel characters in a 1930s-1940s film-noir setting. There were two Spider-Man Noir miniseries within this arc, both four issues long. In this realm, Peter Parker is the protégé of Daily Bugle reporter Ben Urich. He mistakenly receives a tip meant for Urich, goes to a warehouse where a crime lord (the noir-realized version of The Green Goblin) is offloading stolen antiquities. Spiders burst from a broken spider idol and swarm Peter, bestowing him with his great powers. Notably, he never got the lesson “With great power comes great responsibility.” He also uses firearms and has no compunctions about killing. Spider-Man Noir’s abilities are implied to be more mystically bestowed (as from a spider-god) rather than from mutation or a scientific accident. Sony Pictures Animation Peni Parker (SP//dr) Voiced by: Kimiko Glenn ( Orange Is the New Black ) The youngest of the three characters announced, Peni debuted in 2014’s Edge of the Spider-Verse miniseries, which was the first big miniseries to unite an eclectic group of spider-persons across the Marvel multiverse. Edge of the Spider-Verse also featured Spider-Ham and Spider-Man Noir, as well as Spider-Gwen and Miles Morales — in fact, every character in Into the Spider-Verse also appeared in Edge of the Spider-Verse. Peni pilots a mech suit (called SP//dr) her father created — and died operating. Piloting that mech suit meant that she had to allow herself to be bitten by a radioactive spider, which formed part of the mech’s CPU, and of course we know what happens from there. Peni Parker will also be part of this fall’s forthcoming Spidergeddon #0 which follows up Edge of the Spider-Verse by bringing together all kinds of spider-friends who have taken on the name and powers. That includes the Spider-Man cooked up by Insomniac Games for the new PlayStation 4 title . Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse premieres Dec. 14.

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Ace Frehley says he would join KISS farewell tour ‘for the right price’

Casual KISS fans might be surprised to learn that Gene Simmons co-wrote two tracks on former KISS guitarist Ace Frehley’s new solo album, Spaceman (“Without You I’m Nothing” and “Your Wish Is My Command,” the latter of which also features Simmons’s bass playing), or that Simmons even gave the album its title. After all, Frehley’s squabbles with both Simmons and KISS’s other mainstay, Paul Stanley, have been well-documented over the years.
But Frehley tells Yahoo Entertainment that there’s “no bad blood” between him and his ex-bandmates — he recently performed with Simmons in Australia and as part of Simmons’s Vault Experience, and Stanley appeared on Frehley’s 2016 album , Origins Volume 1 — and this of course raises the question, will Frehley, who successfully reunited with Simmons, Stanley, and original drummer Peter Criss in 1996, take part in KISS’s just-announced big farewell tour ?
“I knew you were gonna ask that,” Frehley chuckles. There’s a glint in his eye that suggests he’s not telling the whole story (at one point he asks exactly when this interview will run) but is revealing all he can offer right now. “OK, I have a pat answer, and it’s true: I haven’t been invited.” That doesn’t mean Frehley isn’t open to the idea, however. “For the right price,” he says, he would “absolutely” do it.
“The first year of that reunion tour, we grossed $215 million, and that was 20 years ago. So what would it be today, probably double that? Half a billion? I’m there,” he laughs.
As for whether Criss would also sign on, Frehley says he hasn’t talked to his old bandmate lately. “Most of the time when I want to talk to Peter, I have to talk to his wife. She’s like his manager, Gigi. She’s a nice lady, but I don’t even think Peter has his own cellphone, or if he does, I don’t have the number,” he shrugs. “When I do business with Paul and Gene, I call Paul and he picks up. He goes, ‘Ace Frehley, how you doing?’ Gene says the same thing. When I want to talk to Peter, or ask him a question, it’s Gigi I go through.” Frehley adds, “For the right price, I’m sure he’d do it. I mean, it’s tough to turn down a couple of million dollars.”
Frehley stresses, however, that he’s “not chomping at the bit” to do another reunion tour “because I’m having so much fun with my own band and recording records at home, and producing them, and writing them, and singing them. … My career has been going up and up and up.” He says the real reason he’d do it, aside from the massive payday, would be for the fans .
“I know the fans want it to happen because of the comments on the internet. Ninety percent of them overwhelmingly are saying, ‘Bring Ace back.’ If Paul and Gene decide to put a deaf ear to the fans, I think it’s going to hurt their careers,” says Frehley. “But you know, those guys always have done what they’ve felt like doing, even when it was not necessarily the best move.”
Frehley may be referring to Music From “The Elder,” KISS’s disastrous 1981 concept album that led to Frehley’s exit from the band. Frehley was outvoted by Simmons and Stanley over the album’s direction (“I said, ‘This is the wrong album for this time. Kids are expecting a hard rock record, and you want to give them this themed album about some weird guy who wears a hood?’”), and he came to the following conclusion: “When you’re in a supergroup and you work with a bunch of people and they don’t listen to you and you turn out to be right, a light bulb goes off in your head and you say, ‘Maybe I should be working with people that agree with me.’”
For now, at least, lead guitar on the KISS farewell tour will be handled by longtime band member Tommy Thayer, who’s been controversially wearing Frehley’s Spaceman makeup since 2002. (Simmons and Stanley hold the ownership and licensing rights to Frehley and Criss’s original makeup designs.) “Some of the fans want to kill him! I actually like Tommy. He’s a friend of mine,” says Frehley. “And I have nothing bad to say about Tommy. But the reality is, the KISS configuration at this juncture is pretty much half a copy band. You know, it’d be one thing if Tommy would have invented his own character, invented his own guitar solos. But unfortunately, he’s copying everything I do, note for note. There’s not much leeway for anybody to say what he’s doing is original. I don’t know how I could handle that, you know? I don’t think I could step into a situation, and be somebody else. It’s almost like being a robot. Poor Tommy. My heart bleeds for him!”
However, Frehley has a good sense of humor about the whole situation. “I love [current drummer] Eric [Singer], and I love Tommy,” he says. “Tommy used to be my tour manager! I don’t think a lot of people are aware of that. Before he joined KISS to take my place, he was our tour manager. And I used to send him out to get sandwiches. Next thing you know, he’s wearing my makeup, and playing my solos. Go figure. You know, you can’t write this stuff. If somebody came to a [movie] producer with a story about a famous rock band, and they said, ‘Yeah, the lead guitarist left, who was like loved, appreciated, and a huge sound part of the band, and they hired the road manager,’ the producer would say, “Are you crazy? Nobody is going to believe that!’”
As for Stanley’s recent suggestion that KISS could continue on forever with no original members — i.e., with handpicked replacement musicians wearing the makeup — Frehley says, “I’ve heard that statement. You know why I think he said that? To somehow make people accept Eric and Tommy. Because that would put them in the mindset that, ‘Oh, eventually Gene’s going to be replaced, and Paul, so it’ll be four different guys.’ That’s not gonna fly! You know it, and I know it. I think that was just a psychological ploy, if you want to call it that.”
So for now, Frehley is focused on promoting Spaceman , a record of which he’s extremely and rightfully proud. “You know what people are saying? I’ve done about 50 interviews already with people that have heard it, and they said it reminds them of my ’78 solo album,” he boasts. In fact, Frehley even wanted to call the new album 40 Years Later before Simmons came up with the catchier Spaceman title.
In September 1978, at the height of their fame, all four KISS members concurrently released solo records (all of which are being reissued Oct. 19 as a four-LP colored vinyl boxed set ). But it was the Eddie Kramer-produced Ace Frehley that was the most successful, yielding the top 20 single “New York Groove,” and it was the most critically acclaimed as well. That was an epiphany for Frehley — “I realized I was more creative away from Paul and Gene and Peter than I was with them” — and now, his new Spaceman tracks like the nostalgic “Bronx Boy,” “Rockin’ With the Boys,” and a cover of Eddie Money’s “I Wanna Go Back” carry on that legacy.
Frehley jokes that Simmons and Stanley have “big egos, and they’ll be the first ones to admit it. I have a big ego, but not quite as big as Gene’s. Gene likes to talk about three people: me, myself, and I.” But he does believe they will listen to the KISS Army if the fans want him back — if not for the full farewell tour, then for a specific one-off reunion concert.
“Anything can happen. … The ball’s in Gene and Paul’s court. So fans, if you want it, speak up. If you don’t, don’t. I’m OK either way. Don’t worry about me,” he says. “Tell Paul and Gene what to do — because you pay their salary. It’s true.”
Read more from Yahoo Entertainment:
#NoMakeupSunday: When KISS bared their faces on MTV, 35 years ago Yoshiki and Gene Simmons unite via shared love of rock, Hello Kitty dolls Gene Simmons says Trump ‘has no filter,’ celebrities should ‘shut their pieholes’ about politics KISS’s Paul Stanley opens up about overcoming partial deafness Follow Lyndsey on Facebook , Twitter , Instagram , Google+ , Amazon , Tumblr , Spotify

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