Venom Review

Movie Review / 2 Oct 2018 7:00 PM PDT Venom Review By Laura Prudom This is a spoiler-free review of Ruben Fleischer’s Venom, starring Tom Hardy. The best description of Venom as a movie is provided by a quote from the titular antihero itself: “An armless, legless, faceless thing… rolling down the street like a turd in the wind.” In this Ruben Fleischer-directed monstrosity that rewrites the character’s origin to omit its foundational relationship to Spider-Man (who Sony has rented out to Marvel for the moment) slimy alien Symbiotes are brought to Earth and must merge with a perfectly matched human host in order to survive, otherwise the body rejects them, killing the host and potentially the Symbiote as well. Sadly, Venom suffers from the same lack of cohesion and rejects everything that might’ve turned it into a badass joyride in the vein of Deadpool or Guardians of the Galaxy. The result is a muddled hodgepodge that isn’t sure whether it wants to be comedic or take its troubled antihero way too seriously. (When your main character is threatening to eat someone’s pancreas as a tasty snack, you probably want to lean into the absurdity.) This is a shortcoming of both the script – a lumbering mutant that’s credited to Jeff Pinkner, Scott Rosenberg, and Kelly Marcel – and Fleischer’s direction, both of which yank the actors from overwrought exposition to overproduced action scenes with no sense of pacing or tone. That’s a surprising misstep, considering Fleischer’s balance of both in the horror-comedy Zombieland. Exit Theatre Mode The plot, such as it is, involves disgraced reporter Eddie Brock (Tom Hardy) investigating the sinister machinations of a SpaceX-style corporation called The Life Foundation, which ends up getting him exposed to an oozing creature that, naturally, turns out to be his extraterrestrial soulmate. This merging imbues Eddie with enhanced strength and resilience, but also sticks him with a chatty copilot with bad teeth, an insatiable appetite for live prey (and/or tater tots), and a surreal desire to fix Eddie’s love life. On paper, Hardy is the ideal Eddie Brock, effortlessly embodying the fluid physicality and jittery paranoia of a man being consumed by sentient space goo. Although he’s saddled with some of the clunkiest comic book movie dialogue since Halle Berry’s Catwoman in both his human and Symbiote forms, Hardy at least manages to deliver the movie’s few intentional moments of humor as Eddie grapples with his talkative bodysnatcher. But Venom does little to justify the bond between Eddie and the Symbiote beyond a couple of cursory lines of dialogue. Is the match based on genetics? Personality? Dependent on Venom’s mood? The script is completely uninterested in exploring the logistics of a Symbiote’s transfer between bodies, making some of the third-act contrivances even more baffling. Exit Theatre Mode Without the benefit of a snarky alien companion, the rest of the cast is adrift. Riz Ahmed does his best as the Life Foundation’s generic corporate overlord Carlton Drake, but even the Marvel Cinematic Universe has proven how rare it is to produce a compelling villain, and they’re generally working with much stronger scripts than this. As a result, Ahmed is reduced to scheming and mustache-twirling until the time comes for a messy Symbiote battle, where it’s often impossible to tell which monster we’re supposed to be rooting for, between the murky lighting and sloppy CGI. Michelle Williams is given more to do as Eddie’s ex-girlfriend Anne than your typical superhero movie love interest, but since there’s zero chemistry between her and Hardy, there’s not much reason to root for Eddie and Anne after his mood swings take a turn for the cannibalistic. Meanwhile, Jenny Slate and Reid Scott manage to add some emotional grounding to their characters, but both roles are so underdeveloped, they can’t contribute much to the melee. The first act is a total snooze until Venom makes an appearance, but things liven up once Eddie begins exhibiting some very strange symptoms. This gives Hardy a chance to prove himself as an underused talent when it comes to physical comedy, and his vocal performance as Venom is an effective blend of menace and obsessive affection for his host. The film’s few bright spots are largely due to Hardy’s interplay with himself – this is the second time he’s played dual roles, following 2015’s underwritten but ambitious Legend. It’s frustrating to imagine how much better the movie might’ve been if the creative direction had matched Hardy’s obvious passion for the character. Venom Movie Images

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Ricky Gervais Takes Down Trophy Hunters and Poachers in the Most Epic Rant (VIDEO)

Natasha Brooks October 3, 2018
Ricky Gervais might be loved by the countless fans of The Office around the world, and while we certainly appreciate his humor, we are fans mostly because he is an outspoken animal rights advocate. He has donated profits from his comedy tour to animals, has lent his voice to a number of causes, including speaking out against the dog and cat meat trade , puppy mills , and SeaWorld , and he regularly calls out and ridicules trophy hunters and animal abusers.
This time around, Gervais addresses poachers and trophy hunters (essentially the same thing) and has some choice words for those he calls “psychopaths” who “like shooting things.”
In the above video posted by LADbible on Facebook , Gervais focuses on rhinos and elephants, in particular, pointing out how utterly senseless it is to kill a rhino for its horn made out of keratin, the same material that makes up our own fingernails. He then notes how equally senseless it is to kill a magnificent elephant for the sake of “trinkets” and how maddening it is that trophy hunters give the excuse of “conservation” for their kills.
Gervais reiterates his standpoint, stating: “It’s not conservation; it’s rich psychos who like killing things.”
We could not have said it better ourselves! Every 15 minutes an African elephant is killed for its tusks, Asian elephants are being poached for their skin to make blood-red beaded jewelry , and the Northern White Rhino has already become virtually extinct, with only two living females in existence today. Thank you, Ricky, for calling viewers’ attention to these serious global epidemics that affect each and every one of us and the planet’s biodiversity as a whole.
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Damon Wayans Set To Exit Lethal Weapon Series

October 3, 2018 Damon Wayans set to exit Lethal Weapon series
Just over a week after the debut of the new season, Fox’s adaptation of the action franchise Lethal Weapon has just lost its other leading man as Damon Wayans,, has announced he will be exiting the series after production wraps on the third season.
RELATED: New Lethal Weapon Season 3 Promo Showcases Seann William Scott
In an interview Wayans had with website Eurweb.com (via Variety ), the 58-year-old actor announced his conclusion with the show in December when production wraps, citing his age and health as the main reasons as to why he’s leaving the series, joking he’s “getting too old for this.”
Wayans’ exit comes swiftly on the heels of the firing of former star Clayne Crawford back in May amidst reports of hostile behavior on set towards fellow cast and crew members, which left the fate of the show hanging until Seann William Scott was added in a new role to fill Crawford’s role as Martin Riggs, who was shot and killed in the second season finale.
Scott is portraying Wesley Cole, a war veteran and father who moves to Los Angeles to be closer to his child. Cole’s ex-girlfriend Natalie Flynn is played by Psych vet Maggie Lawson. Flynn is an emergency room surgeon who met Cole in a war zone years prior to the start of the season, only for Cole to land in her ER once again. Cole has partnered with Damon Wayans’ senior detective Roger Murtaugh after the now street cop and senior detective stumble onto the same case and solve it together.
RELATED: Damon Wayans Opens Up About Lethal Weapon Casting Change
Combining action, drama and humor, Lethal Weapon is based on the hit movie franchise. The series stars Wayans, Keesha Sharp ( The People v. O.J. Simpson ), Kevin Rahm ( Mad Men ), Jordana Brewster ( The Fast and the Furious ), Johnathan Fernandez, Dante Brown, Chandler Kinney and Michelle Mitchenor.
Lethal Weapon is a production of Warner Bros. Television in association with Lin Pictures and Good Session Productions. Matt Miller, Dan Lin, Jennifer Gwartz and McG serve as executive producers, and airs Tuesdays at 9 p.m. on Fox.

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