The Teens Who Rack Up Thousands of Followers By Posting the Same Photo Every Day

Every day for more than a year, Joey, a 15-year-old high-school student, has logged on to Instagram and posted the exact same photo of Otis, a cartoon cow from the children’s TV show Back at the Barnyard , to an account that now has almost 30,000 followers.
“For the first couple weeks, the account was only followed by my friends mostly, and a few other people I didn’t know,” said Joey, who, like all the teenagers quoted in this story, asked to be referred to by his first name only. “Over time, it just started to grow crazy amounts of followers, so I started to get committed and continue to run it.”
[ Teens are debating the news on Instagram. ]
Joey is not alone in this endeavor. His account, @daily_otis , is one of thousands of Instagram accounts dedicated to filling its feed with the exact same photo. There’s @samepictureofatoaster , @samepictureofbrick , @samepicofplunger , @samephotooftaylorswift , @samepicofanuggetdaily , and many more.
“Same photo every day” accounts are a subgenre of interest-based “daily” accounts, dedicated to posting one thing within a set theme every day . But over the past year, they’ve become more popular. “It’s just trendy now,” said Lily, a 19-year-old who posts the same photo of her friend every day.
Many adults might be mystified by the appeal, but teens told The Atlantic that they love the absurdist humor. “If people see an account that is posting a toaster, for example, every day for no real reason, they see it as some ironic and funny thing,” Joey said. The fact that someone has devoted such an enormous amount of effort to maintaining something seemingly so meaningless is also part of the appeal. “They’re so dedicated,” Lily said. “The dedication is so funny.”
A subset of same-pic accounts, such as @samepicofmrbeast , also warp the photos more and more every day. Fans think it’s funny to watch the image degrade over time.
maybe the coolest riff on the same pic account is this one that focuses on the same pic of guy fieri. every day the teen who runs it manipulates his photo so he looks a little bit more ghoulish. the result is a grid that is basically art: https://t.co/30cBHEv7Oh pic.twitter.com/aPIoJnkrjy
— alyssa bereznak (@alyssabereznak) October 2, 2018 And while these accounts post the same photo every day, their captions and Stories change. Some teenagers who run single-pic accounts use their page as a sort of diary or anonymous blog, posting about what’s happening in life and at school, or how they’re feeling. “I had to pack the whole day and today I was on an airplane for like 8 hours,” the owner of an account that posts the same photo of a watermelon every day wrote. “Ya girl graduated grade 8,” the owner of @same_picture_of_kun said. “Catch me being late to my first day of summer school,” they added on another pic.
Miranda, a 14-year-old who runs @same.picture.of.kumquat with two friends from her high school, said they started the account as a de-stressor and outlet. “It’s personal-life captions for not such a personal picture,” she said. “It takes the pressure off of having to post a pic of your face or something. We don’t have to edit any pics; the followers know what they’re getting. We can just post a quirky caption about our life at the moment and they relate.”
According to Leonie, a 14-year-old who has gained nearly 10,000 followers from posting on @thesamephotoofbanana , lots of single-picture accounts are really just a gateway to following someone’s Stories. Though she posts the same image of a banana every day to her main feed, her Stories are alive with revealing quizzes, responses to questions about highly personal things such as her most embarrassing memory, and relationship advice.
[ How Daquan went from hometown Instagram account to modern media conglomerate ]
“It’s just another way to post and talk to people,” said Ella, a 16-year-old who runs @same.picture.of.kumquat with Miranda. “Our other accounts are more private. Here we can talk to people from other places, just have conversations, see what people think of ideas , and branch out from the people we’re always talking to. After a while, everything here becomes the same. It’s nice to see what else is out there.”
Of course, the rising follower count is also a perk. “It’s an easy way to get followers,” said Jake, the 14-year-old admin of @samepicofmrbeast.
Ivan, a 15-year-old, started @samepictureofatoaster after seeing a similar account in April. “I called my friends and we decided to all do it as a race to see who could get to 1,000 followers first,” he said. He now has almost 50,000 and has received three free toasters from Hamilton Beach, the manufacturer of the toaster featured in the image he relentlessly reposts.
Ivan said he works hard to maintain his audience and spends about an hour a day on the account, responding to comments and coming up with creative ways to engage his following. He recently launched a Discord chat for fans and is planning to branch out into merch. “Every person I run into who does this is in high school, middle school, and some in elementary school, not a lot of people in college,” Ivan said. “You don’t see old people running these things. Younger people have more time on their hands.”
Same-pic accounts primarily grow followers by commenting on other high-profile accounts with lots of followers, and can be found doing so on every major (and many not-so-major) celebrity account, including those of Beyoncé, Taylor Swift, Emma Stone, and nearly every YouTuber you can think of. The Instagram co-founder Kevin Systrom’s comments are flooded with them.
Kids say commenting like this is a way to introduce their page to new audiences in addition to the Explore page. In some lucky cases, the bigger account will notice them and follow back, which will result in a slew of new followers. Ethan, a 14-year-old who runs @same_photo_heihei , commented on an Instagram photo from Noah Schnapp, the 14-year-old star of Stranger Things , and after Schnapp replied to his comment and followed him back, he gained thousands of followers.
Single-pic-account admins also like to promote themselves in the comments of other same-pic accounts. Maxwell, a 16-year-old who runs @daily_baby_penguin , told me he’s part of two community group chats on Instagram in which his fellow same-pic admins “support and promote each other.”
Though some single-pic accounts post referral codes or offer shout-outs, where they’ll tag another person’s page and tell people to follow, for anywhere from $10 to $25, no one I spoke with said they did this for the money . Mostly, they say, it’s just about seeing how far they can go. Plus, if their account gets big enough, they can just sell it or change it into something else.
“I started this account because I want to go viral and I want to be an Instagram sensation,” Maxwell joked. “JK,” he added.
“I’m not the type of person like I need thousands of followers,” Lily said. “But why not? It feels good; it’s not hurting anyone to gain followers. This is 2018. We do what we want to do.”

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The Mandalorian: First Photo and Details of Jon Favreau’s Star Wars TV Series

Production on the Star Wars live-action television series has officially begun and we have our first look at Jon Favreau’s The Mandalorian, which is being produced for Disney’s upcoming streaming service. Hit the jump to learn more about The Mandalorian.
Lucasfilm and Disney have officially announced the start of production on The Mandalorian, releasing the above image of the titular hero. They also released the following press release:
Production on the first Star Wars live-action streaming series has begun! After the stories of Jango and Boba Fett, another warrior emerges in the Star Wars universe. The Mandalorian is set after the fall of the Empire and before the emergence of the First Order. We follow the travails of a lone gunfighter in the outer reaches of the galaxy far from the authority of the New Republic. The series will be written and executive produced by Emmy-nominated producer and actor Jon Favreau, as previously announced, with Dave Filoni (Star Wars: The Clone Wars, Star Wars Rebels) directing the first episode. Additional episodic directors include Deborah Chow (Jessica Jones), Rick Famuyiwa (Dope), Bryce Dallas Howard (Solemates), and Taika Waititi (Thor: Ragnarok). It will be executive produced by Jon Favreau, Dave Filoni, Kathleen Kennedy, and Colin Wilson. Karen Gilchrist will serve as co-executive producer.
The image of the Mandalorian looks very much like a cross of Jango and Boba Fett, with a metallic helmet and a more battle-worn western styled outfit. What do you think?
Thor: Ragnarok filmmaker Taika Waititi, Bryce Dallas Howard, Deborah Chow and Dave Filoni are among the filmmakers that will direct The Mandalorian , the first Star Wars live-action series. Making Star Wars’ Jason Ward appeared on our Emergency Podcast yesterday and revealed he heard Taika Waititi would be involved, so you heard it here first! These names are very promising, let’s walk through them one by one:
Taika Waititi has been an indie film darling for many years now. I fell in love with him with Eagle vs. Shark and even have a quote on the cover of the DVD/Blu-ray release. He developed a big following in the last few years with his mockumentary What We Do In The Shadows and dramedy Hunt for the Wilderpeople. Most Marvel fans have known him as the filmmaker behind Thor: Ragnarok. His quirky humor will be an interesting mix for the Star Wars universe. Bryce Dallas Howard : She is, of course, the daughter of Ron Howard, who has worked closely with Star Wars creator George Lucas and even directed Solo: A Star Wars Story. Howard has made a huge name for herself in front of the camera over the last decade and a half, but she has had aspirations to move behind the camera like her father. She has directed four short films which have played film festivals and has been developing feature projects. She directed the Lucy segment of the tv movie Call Me Crazy: A Five Film and did an episode of Vanity Fair: Decades. Deborah Chow : Her 2010 feature directorial debut The High Cost of Living won the Best Canadian First Feature Film at the Toronto International Film Festival. She’s directed a lot of television, including episodes of Iron Fist, Fear The Walking Dead, Jessica Jones, Lost in Space, Snowfall, Better Call Saul and The Man in High Castle. Her episode of Better Call Saul titled Something Stupid premiered a couple weeks back was very good. Dave Filoni: The Clone Wars and Star Wars Rebels showrunner has proven himself to be a master storyteller within the Star Wars animated universe. He shadowed director Rian Johnson on the set of The Last Jedi and will be making his live-action directorial debut on this show and anyone who has watched Clone Wars or Rebels is very very excited right about now. It was previously rumored that he will direct two of eight or ten episodes. Filoni will reportedly direct the first episode. Rick Famuyiwa : My favorite film of the 2015 Sundance Film Festival was a movie titled Dope from Famuyiwa. I’m so excited to see what he can do in a galaxy far far away. I’m happy to see Filoni on this list, and Watiti is a very interesting inclusion indeed. I’m glad Kathleen Kennedy is finally listing to the criticism from fans, bringing some female directing talent into this galaxy. I really enjoyed Chow’s episode of Better Call Saul and I was impressed with her explanation of craft on the show’s official podcast. I hate to admit that I haven’t seen any of Howard’s short films, but I’m going to use this as an excuse to correct that. She’s a very talented woman and she’s practically in the Star Wars family already. And it’s great to see the diversity in the selection of these filmmakers. A great line-up indeed.
Yesterday, show creator and producer Jon Favreau revealed The Mandalorian title in the following image posted to Instagram:
This confirms earlier rumors from Making Star Wars that the show would be set on the Outer Rim planet of Mandalore. We have also heard that the show will either be eight or ten episodes, costing an estimated$100 million, which places it near the top of the list of the most expensive shows in history. The six episodes in Game of Thrones ‘ upcoming final season are said to cost around $15 million each. Recently the same source heard rumblings that Star Wars Rebels creator/showrunner Dave Filloni might be directing two of the episodes .
Favreau previously told NYT that “ Star Wars is a big world, and Disney’s new streaming service affords a wonderful opportunity to tell stories that stretch out over multiple chapters.”
Mandalore has a very complicated history. The Star Wars wiki says that a huge Mandalorian War began in 3976 BBY (before the Battle of Yavin) and lasted for nearly twenty years. The machinations of the war itself are relatively complex, but in short, it involved characters like Mandalore The Ultimate, a rampaging conquerer, and Revan, a warrior who first appeared in the 2003 video game Knights of the Old Republic , which was also set around that same time.
As for who will be featured in this new television series, we don’t know, although rumors recently have involved everyone from Pedro Pascal to Werner Herzog . Setting the show in the time between the original and sequel trilogies allows Favreau to construct a story about this planet and people not yet touched upon in Star Wars canon. I’m very excited to see what this show is.
Bob Iger first announced the series back in February , revealing that Disney “are developing not just one, but a few Star Wars series specifically for the Disney direct to consumer app.” The codename for the live-action Star Wars series is Project Huckleberry, and the show has recently started production in Southern California with exterior shooting on a big desert marketplace set (set videos can be found elsewhere online).
The post The Mandalorian: Directors, First Photo, Details & More Revealed for Jon Favreau’s Star Wars TV Series appeared first on /Film .

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Brett Kavanaugh’s Female Friends — Women Who Stand Up for Him & Defend His Character | National Review

October 4, 2018 6:30 AM Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee, September 27, 2018. (Michael Reynolds/Pool via Reuters) Six of Brett Kavanaugh’s close friends testify to his character, integrity, and kindness.
I n his testimony last week before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Judge Brett Kavanaugh vigorously refuted Christine Blasey Ford’s sexual-assault allegation against him, calling it “radically inconsistent with my record and my character from my youth to the present day.”
As part of his testimony, Kavanaugh described in detail his lifelong friendships with several women:
One feature of my life — that has remained true to the present day — is that I’ve always had a lot of close female friends. I’m not talking about girlfriends. I’m talking about friends who are women. That started in high school. Maybe it was ’cause I’m an only child and had no sisters. But we had no social media or texts and email and we talked on the phone. I remember talking almost every night, it seemed, to my friends Amy or Julie or Kristin or Karen or Suzanne or Maura or Meghan or Nicki. The list goes on. Friends for a lifetime built on a foundation of talking through school and life starting at age 14. Several of those great women are in the seats right behind me today.
Several of the women named in his remarks, along with a few others, spoke with National Review about their decades-long friendships with Kavanaugh and their anguish over the allegations that have arisen against him.
Meghan McCaleb was a year behind Kavanaugh in school and met him her freshman year of high school. She says she knew him because he had dated a few of her friends, as well as her older sister for a few months. “I just remember that he was always so kind to her. My parents really liked him, and he was so polite to all of us,” McCaleb says.
Even though Kavanaugh and her sister broke up after three months, all three of them stayed friends. “It always struck me what a great guy he was,” she adds. “There were other boyfriends we had who we never saw again. But it was different with Brett.” Advertisement Advertisement
“I can count on one hand the number of people from high school that I’d stand up for in such a vocal way, and Brett is one of them,” McCaleb says. “I have complete faith in his character. I absolutely stand by him.” Advertisement
Julie DeVol is also one of the women Kavanaugh referenced in his testimony, and she tells National Review they became best friends after they met in 1980 through a group of high-school friends. “We used to get each other dates to dances and different events, but he and I never went to dances together because we were like brother and sister,” she says.
DeVol said several times throughout our conversation that Kavanaugh was always the patient, responsible one in their friend group. “He was always there taking care of us,” she says. “I was a year younger, and he was like my big brother. He wouldn’t let any guys mess around with you. If anybody was drinking, he would be the one taking care of you. Not everyone in his friend group was like that, but he always was.” Advertisement
And that was true all the time, not just when their friends were spending time together on weekends or at parties. “He used to always help me with my homework over the phone,” DeVol adds. “My mom would say we couldn’t talk on the phone until I had done my homework, so he’d walk me through my math problems and other work so that we could talk.” Advertisement
Suzanne Matan — another of the women Kavanaugh mentioned in his testimony and who sat behind him during the hearing — met him in 1980 when she entered private Catholic school her sophomore year. She agrees with DeVol that he was always known among their friends for being responsible and careful. “You always have one in every class who sort of looks out for everyone,” she explains. “He stood out among us as being the responsible guy, the smart guy.”
She has a specific memory of when she realized in high school what kind of person Kavanaugh is. “One time he had asked me out to dinner, and it started to snow fairly heavily,” Matan says. “His mother called my mother and said Brett wanted to use the car to take me out to dinner, but his mother and mine were both worried the roads might get bad.” Advertisement
But Kavanaugh was insistent that he had promised to take her to dinner, and he intended to do so, snow or not. He convinced their parents that he’d drive carefully and bring Suzanne home early. “He took me out, brought me home, and walked me right to the door and said good night,” Matan recalls. “That’s how I remember Brett. The guy that came and picked you up, you had a nice conversation, he brought you home and took you to the door. The guy who kept his promises.”
According to women who have known him later in life, too, Kavanaugh’s character and integrity have remained consistent regardless of age or circumstance. Monica Mastal has known Kavanaugh for several decades because her siblings were in school with him, they’ve remained lifelong friends, and she also worked with him for a time. Their children attend the same parish school, Kavanaugh coached her daughter in basketball at the school, and she testified for him before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Advertisement
“I worked with him briefly at the office of independent counsel when I was in my young twenties, when I was an intern during law school,” Mastal says. “I was just an intern and he was an attorney, but he was always very friendly and supportive. He was kind to everyone on staff, whether you were an intern or FBI agent. It didn’t matter.”
Anita McBride also worked with Kavanaugh in the White House, under the George W. Bush administration. She’s known him since 2001, when she was working as acting director of White House personnel for the transition period, which meant working closely with Kavanaugh, who was an associate counsel in the White House at the time.
“There were things I’d send to him for review, and he was always a very responsive colleague,” McBride explains. “A lot of the time we’d work long hours, and he’d walk papers down to my office late, late at night, just to be sure that he got to them in the same day that I had sent them to him. I very much appreciated that, his responsiveness and collegiality as a fellow staff member.” Advertisement Advertisement
McBride says Kavanaugh was widely respected in the White House, especially when he later served as staff secretary to President Bush and managed decision-making processes. She calls him “an exemplary honest broker” and says he was “fair to everybody on the staff,” making sure everyone, no matter their rank, had a chance to give equal input. “It was very clear the president really trusted the way that he handled his job.”
Cathie Martin first met Kavanaugh when they both were lawyers in Washington, D.C., running in the same professional and social circles; they later worked together in the White House. “We had children at the same time and spent those early parenting years together, at each other’s houses, dealing with children’s birthday parties, and holidays, and babies,” she says. “You get to know people pretty well during those times.”
Martin says Kavanaugh was always highly professional in the workplace: “He’s a really reserved and humble guy, so he had a way of connecting with staff throughout the White House in a very friendly and unassuming way.” At one point, Martin managed a staff made up of people under 30, who she says “were always highly impressed with how professional and respectful [Kavanaugh] was to them, not to mention to his peers and seniors.” Advertisement
McBride agrees that Kavanaugh was always highly regarded for the way he treated everyone with whom he worked, including women. “Honestly, I’ve worked in this town for 35 years. . . . I’ve seen the best of colleagues and not the best of colleagues,” she says. “There are very, very few in all those years who I can say I’d truly go to the mat for. Brett is one of them, because of the way he treated people around him, whether superiors or subordinates. Even in the highly intense atmosphere of the White House, this is a guy who never lost his cool and had a sense of humor about him, even in the toughest of times, that was very helpful to be around. The way he treated everybody, men and women, was always the same.”
“Brett was the kind of person who, because he’s so mild-mannered, so accomplished, and has such a grounded center of what is right and good, he attracted really good people around him,” Martin adds. “He made you want to be better, and that’s why people who know him are standing up for him.”
All of these women are insistent that they are completely sure Kavanaugh would never commit the sexual misconduct of which he’s been accused — it would contradict everything they’ve experienced over decades of friendship with him.
“Knowing Brett, who honestly was always mature and respectful, nothing in his life has ever led us to believe he would do anything like this,” Mastal says.
“I am 100 percent sure that this isn’t something he would do, because everything I know and have seen and experienced with Brett contradicts that,” Matan tells me. “If any of my friends had experienced anything differently, we would know about it. We could choose the guys we hung out with. No one was forcing us to hang out with that group of guys. We chose to hang out with those guys because we felt comfortable around them, they were fun to be with, and they respected us.”
McCaleb says she could never believe the allegations against Kavanaugh. “That just wasn’t Brett’s personality at all,” she says. “He was one of the more responsible ones of the bunch, there’s no question. He just was not aggressive in that way at all. When I heard the allegation, I was shocked. . . . I don’t doubt that something happened to [Ford] at some point. But not with Brett. Never ever.”

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