RT – Daily news: ‘Urge to destroy is also a creative urge’: Banksy shares details of auction shredding prank (VIDEO)

‘Urge to destroy is also a creative urge’: Banksy shares details of auction shredding prank (VIDEO) Published time: 6 Oct, 2018 23:48 Edited time: 7 Oct, 2018 07:55 Get short URL © banksyfilm / YouTube Famous street artist Banksy has published a video, revealing how he secretly built a shredder into one of his paintings years ago and showing the moment it got ripped to shreds, after selling at auction for $1.1mn at Sotheby’s.
“The urge to destroy is also a creative urge,” wrote Banksy, citing a leading anarchist theorist of the nineteenth century, Mikhail Bakunin, but attributing the quote to the famous painter Pablo Picasso.
‘We’ve been Banksy’d!’ Balloon girl self-destructs on fetching $1.3mn at Sotheby’s auction (VIDEOS)
In his Instagram post, Banksy explained that he built the secret device and embedded it into the painting’s frame “a few years ago”, just “in case it was ever put up for auction.” Such forethought paid off Friday, when the artist’s ‘Girl with a Balloon’ fetched a record of £860,000 (£1.04mn or $1.37mn with buyer’s premium) at a Contemporary Art Evening Auction at Sotheby’s London – and got destroyed the moment the hammer dropped.
Some auction attendees on Friday seemed shocked when the painting began to self-destruct. Others were quick to take out their cell phones to record the historic moment the Girl With Red Balloon self-shredded to strips.
While Banksy failed to share how the shredder was set in motion, those who attended the Sotheby’s event noticed a strange man inside the crowd, prompting rumors that the destruction mechanism was activated by the elusive artist himself. Banksy exhibit opens in Moscow, overcoming bad blood between Russia and UK https://t.co/NcNLzHFSBv pic.twitter.com/anIfJDCkzI — RT (@RT_com) June 2, 2018
“We’ve just been Banksy’d,” said Alex Branczik, senior director at Sotheby’s, on Friday. “He is arguably the greatest British street artist, and tonight we saw a little piece of Banksy genius.”
Social media users found Banksy’s own heist method also to be “F**king brilliant!” , posting support messages next to his Instagram video post. ” Art and humor! Love it”, “brilliant” , “You are a genius !!!!” were just some of the comments the anonymous artist received following the stunt. / © Banksy via WikiArt
The secretive icon had once made clear that he does not like his paintings to be sold to the highest bidder. A few years back he published an image on his website mocking an auction hous e and their clients for bidding for the framed words “I can’t believe you morons actually buy this sh*t”.
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Trevor Noah explains why Donald Trump wins culture wars: “He knows how to offer victimhood”

Trevor Noah; Donald Trump (Comedy Central/AP) Trevor Noah explains why Donald Trump wins culture wars: “He knows how to offer victimhood” “He’s saying the real victims of the #MeToo movement are men,” the “Daily Show” host said of Trump Rachel Leah October 5, 2018 5:48pm (UTC)
“The Daily Show” host Trevor Noah offered a diatribe about President Donald Trump Thursday night that was free of humor. There were no jokes that could lighten the reality that the president of the United States used a sexual assault survivor as a punchline during a campaign rally . There were no sufficient gags that could complicate the indifference to sexual violence and the outright vitriol toward women that has cascaded down from the president, the GOP and its supporters since Trump’s second Supreme Court nominee was accused of misconduct by three women. And there were no antics that Noah could muster that would change the fact that Trump, Kavanaugh, and rich, white men like them, are among the most privileged and powerful in this world — yet still have the audacity to claim victimhood .
“Trump’s most powerful tool is that he knows how to wield victimhood,” Noah said, in a clip filmed between the scenes of Thursday’s show. “He knows how to offer victimhood to the people who have the least claim to it.” “Trump’s most powerful tool is that he knows how to wield victimhood. He knows how to offer victimhood to the people who have the least claim to it.” #BetweenTheScenes pic.twitter.com/1sRr0EGxc4
— The Daily Show (@TheDailyShow) October 5, 2018
Addressing some of Trump’s recent comments , like arguing that it is the men who are most vulnerable in the era of #MeToo and are subjected to rampant false accusations with no semblance of due process, Noah marveled at the power of such manipulation.
“He’s saying the real victims of the #MeToo movement are men, they’re the real victims,” Noah noted. “Someone can accuse you at any time, and your life is over.”
Trump’s point has only been made more palatable by the women who work for him. The #MeToo movement has been co-opted by statements from White House counselor Kellyanne Conway and press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders saying they fear for their sons in this time, not their daughters.
Noah argued that what Trump has voiced is so powerful because it is shared widely by men across the country: a belief that the sheer outpour of women coming forward means they too could be falsely accused, rather than the reality that for centuries women have been forced to suffer in silence.
“I always go to people, and I’m like what do you mean it’s gotten out of control?” Noah said, estimating that it’s been around 100 people who’ve been “#MeToo’d” or “held accountable” in the past year. “That’s not a life-changing number of men, they make it sound like all men have been accused,” he said, adding that but somehow the narrative has become that now all men should be afraid.
“You could fit 100 men into a comedy club and then Louis C.K. could come and surprise them ,” Noah said, “that’s how few that number is.”
Since Dr. Christine Blasey Ford stepped forward with her sexual assault accusation against Kavanaugh, there has been a growing hysteria around the so-called prominence of false accusations against men. While conservatives have often cited only one example, the Duke Lacrosse case from 12 years ago, the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network estimates that one out of every six American women has been a victim of rape or attempted rape in her lifetime.
“How many men, percentage-wise, have been falsely accused of a sexual assault? And how many women have actually been sexually assaulted?” Noah asked. “Women are the victims in this situation.”
Noah said that Trump’s ability to reshape victimhood is seen in his policies and rhetoric throughout his short, political career. When it comes to immigration, migrant children separated from their parents — incarcerated in detention centers for weeks , herded to tent-cities in the middle of the night — are not the real victims, Trump says, but it’s the American people, who should fear them.
“He’s done it with Kavanaugh now,” Noah said. “The guy’s heading to the Supreme Court, but he’s making it like ‘this poor man, look at him, this poor man.’ What’s the worst thing that could happen to Brett Kavanaugh is that he’d go back to being a federal judge on one of the most important courts in the land. That’s what he goes down to if he fails.”
READ MORE: From Clarence Thomas to Brett Kavanaugh: History and her story, on TV
“What’s the worst thing that happens to Dr. Ford?” Noah continued. “She gets mocked by the president of the United States for coming forward with a story about sexual assault.”
“The Daily Show” host wondered if the next time someone dared to question why women don’t come forward to report, if the fact that the president used a woman’s sexual assault as the butt of a joke at a campaign rally, will serve as an adequate defense. This is a very important time in our country. Due Process, Fairness and Common Sense are now on trial!
— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 4, 2018
But Trump’s screams of “fairness” and a lack of “due process” have always been selective, centered on his determination to maintain white male power, no matter the cost, and facing no real risks to losing it, as Adam Serwer wrote for The Atlantic :
The president who demanded the execution of five black and Latino teenagers for a crime they didn’t commit decrying ‘false accusations,’ when his Supreme Court nominee stands accused; his supporters who fancy themselves champions of free speech meet references to Hillary Clinton or a woman whose only crime was coming forward to offer her own story of abuse with screams of ‘Lock her up!’ The political movement that elected a president who wanted to ban immigration by adherents of an entire religion, who encourages police to brutalize suspects, and who has destroyed thousands of immigrant families for violations of the law less serious than those of which he and his coterie stand accused, now laments the state of due process.
Yet, Trump’s manipulations of victimhood is working. Republican senators have told women disclosing horrific experiences of sexual violence to “grow up,” that ” I know this is enjoyable to y’all,” when confronted by women and survivors , and in multiple instances, refused to even shake the hands of women constituents trying to voice their concerns . Meanwhile, their defense of Kavanaugh has been expressed exhaustively, accusing the Democrats of attempting to destroy Kavanaugh’s life, and advancing his nomination to a final vote on Friday . Just one more vote stands between Kavanaugh and a lifetime appointment, yet, somehow, he is the real victim here. The very rude elevator screamers are paid professionals only looking to make Senators look bad. Don’t fall for it! Also, look at all of the professionally made identical signs. Paid for by Soros and others. These are not signs made in the basement from love! #Troublemakers
— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 5, 2018
More than likely, by the end of the weekend, Kavanaugh will be confirmed to the Supreme Court, and then one-third of the male justices will have been accused of sexual misconduct. Rachel Leah MORE FROM Rachel Leah You can now support Salon from as little as $2, and help shape the future of Salon that you’d prefer. Salon’s pioneering, award-winning journalism that is read by people in over 230 countries has been mostly supported by advertising revenue over its 20+ year history. To keep up with the costs of creating great content, we increasingly need to run more advertising to support the business. In an effort to reduce the amount of ads, we are offering our readers the opportunity to directly contribute to us. SUPPORT SALON.COM

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Legendary St. John’s football coach John Gagliardi dies – StarTribune.com

John Gagliardi several years after his retirement as St. John’s football coach was asked which single word best described his coaching style. His choice: “Unorthodox.”
Gagliardi, the winningest coach in college football history, has died at the age of 91, his family announced Sunday. He defied conventional football coaching wisdom with no-tackle, no-whistle practices and a request his players call him John, not coach. The unorthodox approach resulted in a career record of 489-138-11 and four national championships in 64 seasons, the final 60 at St. John’s.
He credited much of his success with his “winning with no” philosophy, a list of “no’s” that steadily grew throughout his career to more than 100. He gained the most notoriety for his no-tackling in practice and his refusal to cut players, which yielded rosters approaching 200 players annually. His one basic team rule, he often said, was “the golden rule — treat everybody like you’d like to be treated yourself. For the most part, we tried to do that.”
His former players say his coaching affected their lives long after they were finished as players. He would introduce freshmen to college football by holding up a dime against a bright sun and saying that the dime was football, the sun their life. Remember that, he said, and there would be no trouble keeping football in perspective.
“I can tell you that I built my career modeled after the things I learned from John — the way he prepped for a game, the way he made you believe in yourself,” said Joe Mucha, a retired General Mills executive who played on Gagliardi’s first two national championship teams. “Very few people in the world affect you that way.”
Gagliardi, who influenced several other area coaches, including Eden Prairie’s Mike Grant, received a deluge of e-mails from former players upon his retirement six years ago. Bruce Bisping, Star Tribune John Gagliardi in 2012.
“John was tremendously successful — unparalleled success from a football standpoint,” Blake Elliott, an All-America wide receiver on Gagliardi’s last national championship team in 2003, said when the coach retired. “But what isn’t written about is how many lives he’s touched. Think about what not cutting guys means: 60 years with 190 guys on every team. That’s thousands of people that have had a positive impact by being around John.”
Gagliardi in a wide-ranging interview in the summer of 2014 said his unorthodox style is linked to the fact that he never intended on becoming a coach. So everything he tried, everything that worked, became a part of his style. A little bit here, a little bit there, all added together to become that ever expanding list of coaching no’s.
He published a pamphlet titled “Winning with No” that was used as a recruiting tool, and a reminder for current players on why they had chosen St. John’s. The list of 100 no’s included these:
• No mission statement.
• No surviving without humor.
• No blocking or tackling dummies.
• No use of the words “hit,” “kill,” etc. …
• No rules, except the Golden Rule.
“Why?” he said when asked the origin of his coaching style. “Because I didn’t know any better. … I was just hanging on by my toenails. No goals. I was just trying to survive.”
Gagliardi’s first coaching assignment came without warning, as a high school senior at tiny Trinidad Catholic High School in Trinidad, Co. Gagliardi’s teammates approached him with the idea of being a player/coach after the team’s head coach was summoned to serve during World War II.
The school was considering disbanding the team, a perennial loser, before Gagliardi convinced school officials he could handle being a player/coach. A rare winning season followed, and Gagliardi was asked to stay on, and produced another winning season.
“The thing I really remember is that our coach before didn’t allow us to have water [during practice],” Gagliardi said. “That was the prevailing thought back then: Don’t drink water during practice. I just ignored that. … A lot of the things I did later were because I started that way, and it worked so I never changed. As I got to a higher level coaching, people thought I was nuts. But eventually I think I’ve won over most of those people.”
Gagliardi started taking night classes at the local junior college so he could play with the college’s basketball team, not necessarily pursue a college education. That allowed him to spend a total of four seasons coaching the Trinidad football team, and he did well enough to attract the attention of St. Mary’s High School officials of Colorado Springs.
A priest at the school offered him two years of tuition at nearby Colorado College in exchange for coaching St. Mary’s. After two seasons, Gagliardi had a college degree and an offer to coach Division III Carroll College in Helena, Mont., where his teams went 24-6-1 with three conference titles in four seasons. He also coached basketball, winning two conference titles in the four years.
A high school coach from Billings, Mont., who had attended St. John’s, convinced Gagliardi to visit the Collegeville campus and talk about the school’s vacant coaching positions for football and hockey.
“I was happy at Carroll College, perfectly content,” Gagliardi said. “I didn’t even what to look at this job. But I went, it was a much bigger school and they doubled my salary. I figured, what the hell. I’m single, why not? If it doesn’t work out, so what.”
Gagliardi coached football 60 seasons at St. John’s, and had the hockey team five years. He won 78 percent of his football games, and had 42-25-1 record (.630 winning percentage) with the SJU hockey team.
“I coached a lot of sports along the way I didn’t know much about,” he said. “You just have to learn on the job, somehow. If there’s a key, I think it’s that I didn’t alienate my players.”
Gagliardi always steadfastly refused naming a favorite player from his years at St. John’s, and he also fought against the school having a Hall of Fame. He was fortunate, he said, to have had an ally in that view in longtime men’s basketball coach Jim Smith.
“It would be like picking your favorite child,” Gagliardi said of his opposition.
He did have a favorite victory — well, more like a 1 and a 1A. The top choice would be St. John’s first national title, coming in a 33-27 victory over Prairie View A&M in the NAIA title game.
His fourth and final national title came in 2003, when the Johnnies defeated perennial power Mount Union 24-6 for the NCAA Division III championship.
His toughest loss? “Every one was like a dagger in the heart,” he said.
An interview with Gagliardi was always entertaining. He was known for his quick wit, which produced lines such as these:
On his SJU salary: “When I came to St. John’s, the monks told me there was a vow of poverty. I didn’t realize that included the football coach.”
On receiving a note from the White House upon retiring in 2012: “Maybe I better change my vote.”
On Johnnie quarterback Willie Seiler, who became a star when he got his first shot at regular playing time as a senior: “I remember people saying to me, ‘Willie really improved.’ I said, ‘No, Willie didn’t improve. My judgment improved.’ I finally had the good sense to play the guy.”
Even after retirement Gagliardi continued teaching a “Theory of coaching” class at St. John’s. Normal class size for St. John’s is around 20. The class was so popular that Gagliardi lined his classroom with folding chairs, and always had around 75 students in his classes.
Gagliardi said the school did have one problem with his teaching.
“I used to give all A’s,” he said. “They told me I couldn’t do that. I said, ‘Look, these are smart kids, and I’m a helluva coach. What else am I supposed to do?’”
School officials decided to make the class a pass/fail offering only.
Didn’t faze Gagliardi one bit.
“I did everything my way,” he said. “The classes. The coaching.”
Unorthodox to the end.

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