Trending Now: 13 Warm, Inviting Kitchens You’d Want to Wake Up To (13 photos)

Most Popular Trending Now: 13 Warm, Inviting Kitchens You’d Want to Wake Up To Some of the most popular kitchen photos recently uploaded to Houzz offer a recipe for creating a welcoming design Mitchell Parker October 8, 2018 Houzz Editorial Staff. Home design journalist writing about cool spaces, innovative trends, breaking news, industry analysis and humor. Houzz Editorial Staff. Home design journalist writing about cool spaces, innovative… More Email Save Comment 13 Like 38 Our Trending Now series features the most-saved photos uploaded to Houzz in the previous three months. Warm and inviting means different things to different people. There’s one test I apply when it comes to kitchens. Is this the kind of room I’d like to spend the morning in drinking coffee with friends and family after a late night? To me, that means lots of sunshine, an abundance of wood and plenty of comfortable seating on which you can sip a hot drink and watch someone else cook breakfast. In my mind, the following popular recent kitchens by designers on Houzz embody that cozy vibe. Now, if only the homeowners would invite me to a holiday party. Bartelt. The Remodeling Resource 1. Beckoning Barn It’s easy to see why this has been the most popular kitchen photo uploaded to Houzz since July 1. Designers Matt Retzak and Heather Scott of Bartelt the Remodeling Resource used t imber framing, a wood ceiling and reclaimed pine on the floor and island top to put anyone lucky enough to belly up to that countertop in a sandwich of coziness. Cream-colored cabinets (Creamy by Sherwin-Williams, in fact), stone countertops and a green-covered view make this barn kitchen worth getting out of bed for. New River Building Co. 2. Sunny Side Up Something magical happens when sunlight hits brass fixtures, light wood floors and creamy cabinets (here, it’s the fittingly titled Wind’s Breath by Benjamin Moore). Michelle Mentzer designed a winning recipe for this welcoming vibe. Even the gray-tiled backsplash and granite countertop add to the visual softness. Kroiss Development, Inc. 3. Lakeside Lightness Hard to imagine a more blissful moment than raising a steaming cup of coffee to your lips as you watch the sun rise over Minnesota’s Lake Minnetonka through this kitchen’s wall-to-wall windows. Meanwhile, ash wood cabinets and brass hardware and shelving rods give off a subtle golden aura, waking up the light and airy design by Laurie Kruhoeffer . Lavender & Lotus Interior Design 4. Farm Fresh Many of us have been fortunate to spend time in a home that just has good vibes — maybe it was a vacation cabin, a best friend’s house, your grandparents’ place or your own. Designer Aimee Brothers of Lavender & Lotus Interior Design nailed that feeling with this New Hampshire farmhouse kitchen. Her approach included an antique sink, a mix of refinished oak and painted cabinets, beadboard paneling on the island, rich wood floors and dark granite countertops. Keith Wing Custom Builders 5. Spanish Revival If someone described a kitchen as having soaring ceilings, tile floors and a large cast-stone range hood, you might imagine that kitchen would look cold.But that’s not the case for this kitchen design by Courtney Blanton Interiors , where reclaimed wood beams, soothing white walls (Mediterranean White from RH) and a dark, worn antique farm table make it just the kind of kitchen you’d want to stick around in for a second breakfast. Design Shop Interiors 6. California Casual Leyla Jaworski and Ashlee Berry of Design Shop Interiors used white shiplap walls and cabinets (Decorator’s White by Benjamin Moore) to embrace the Northern California sunshine while wood-look tile flooring and a large custom maple island and table would have anyone clearing their calendar for the day to hang out here. Lenore Weiss Studios, LLC 7. Into the Woods If you want warm and welcoming, just think walnut. Designer Lenore Weiss used the wood extensively in this Chicago kitchen, making it a cozy destination even during the most blustery of winter mornings. A Fusion quartzite island countertop and range backsplash make the kitchen all the more dynamic and inviting. Blackband Design 8. Morning Ritual Mixing wood tones and species is a juggling act, but designer Wendy Blackband of Blackband Design didn’t fumble in this Southern California kitchen. A rift-cut oak coffee cabinet on the right beckons guests to grab a cup and take a seat at the alder wood table while breakfast is laid out on the island. Woodhull of Maine 9. Maine Catch Imagine shuffling down that back staircase in the morning to this raw wood post-and-beam -framed kitchen overlooking Cape Elizabeth in Maine, designed by Caleb Johnson Studio and Krista Stokes . Stained walnut and white cabinets and shiplap walls complete the casual coastal style. JM Kitchen & Bath 10. Colorado Cozy In this Denver-area kitchen designed by Michael Thulson of JM Kitchen & Bath , you can almost feel the warmth radiating off the rich wood floor, cherry cabinets, Supreme Gold granite countertops and natural slate backsplash in Brazilian Multicolor. Landmark Builders 11. Gather Around This Sacramento kitchen built by Landmark Builders is full of warm wood surfaces. And the California air circulating through a Dutch door would make for a fine morning almost any day of the year. Yellowstone Traditions 12. Log Lounge If there’s a scale for determining the coziness of a home, a log cabin in Wyoming has to be at the top. This home designed by Peter Zimmerman Architects and Peace Design features a kitchen ensconced in reclaimed-wood walls, hand-hewn timbers, standing dead-log beams, reclaimed-wood ceiling planks, antique oak flooring and wormy chestnut cabinets. steve + filip design 13. Soft Side Quarter-sawn white oak cabinets, stained in a finish with a bit of gray in it, soften the light pouring into one end of this Chicago kitchen designed by Filip Malyszko of steve + filip design . Warm white shiplap walls and ceiling also mute the light, creating a soothing atmosphere that never gets chilly.

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Neil Gaiman on adapting his and Terry Pratchett’s Good Omens for TV

At New York Comic Con this weekend, Amazon released the first look at its upcoming miniseries, Good Omens , based on the classic fantasy novel. At a press event, co-creator Neil Gaiman and members of the cast explained their approach to adapting the book for television.
The comedic fantasy novel was a collaboration between Neil Gaiman and the late Terry Pratchett, in which Aziraphale, an angel played by Michael Sheen, and Crowley, a demon played by David Tennant, must collaborate to stop the coming end times. The two have become unlikely friends in the last 6,000 years, and together they’ve come to like living on Earth, and don’t want to see it end. The trailer introduces us to both creatures as Crowley reaches out to Aziraphale to tell him that the world is coming to an end. It goes on to detail their long years of friendship as they meet run into one another over the years; from the looks of it, the series will have a real buddy-comedy feel as the two team up to stave off armageddon.
Speaking to The Verge at New York Comic Con, Gaiman reflected on developing the show without Pratchett, who died in 2015 due to complications from Alzheimer’s Disease. He explained that the two had discussed adapting the series ( there had been a film with Robin Williams and Johnny Depp planned at one point ), and they had agreed that, like the book, working on an adaptation would be a collaborative project. “We only did things together, or not at all,” he said. Before his death, however, Pratchett told Gaiman that he had to go forward without him. “I came back from his funeral and started writing the first episode of Good Omens ,” he said, “and tried to convince myself that it was funny.”
“I was writing them for a very specific audience, Terry Pratchett. That was my standard.” Without Pratchett to fill out the duo’s writing process, Gaiman says he had to find workarounds. “There would be two different phenomena going on,” he says. “One was, if I got stuck during the writing process, what I’d always done before on Good Omens , was to call Terry.” Gaiman would “either send him what [I’d] done so far, and he looks at it and carries on writing it, or he phones you up and says ‘the answer, grasshopper, is in the way you ask the question!’ [I’d] then go, ‘Terry, don’t be irritating, tell me what you think.’” With the series, though, he couldn’t do either of those, but imagined writing for Pratchett anyway. “When you write a book or TV show, you have an imaginary audience in your head,” he says. “When I wrote my bits of Good Omens , the novel, I was writing them for a very specific audience: Terry Pratchett. That was my standard [for the series, as well].”
Series director Douglas Mackinnon noted that while he had never met Pratchett, the author’s presence was there on the set, and that they worked to honor his sense of humor, but also to ensure that the series could stand on its own, rather than being a strict retelling of the original novel. Sheen notes that Mackinnon was protective of the book, with a well-thumbed copy close at hand to refer to as needed. But “at a certain point, you have to let go of what it was before,” Sheen says, “and then, hopefully, if someone comes and reminds you, ‘That’s just like that bit in the book,’ you go, ‘Thank god for that, I must be doing it right.’”
“I think once we started shooting, I put the book down, actually,” Tennant chimes in. “In a way, it then becomes its own beast, and you’re playing each scene as it comes up. There has to come a point where you have to go ‘Well, now it’s this, we’ve made a decision, and that’s the story we’re telling.”
“That’s where having Neil [Gaiman] on set really helps,” Sheen adds, “because you know you can’t veer off too much, [and] you’re sort of getting [his] seal of approval every day.”
Good Omens will begin streaming on Amazon Prime in 2019.

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Discord is a safe space for white supremacists.

Why LADbible Is More Popular on Facebook Than the New York Times When more than 500 white supremacists, neo-Nazis, and members of the alt-right marched in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2017, they weren’t just showcasing their startling numbers and their hateful creeds but also their organizational capacity. There were guest speakers, rideshares, demonstration permits, and houses and hotels rented out—everything you’d expect from a group staging a large protest. But since the Unite the Right rally promoted a message of racism and anti-Semitism, the leaders didn’t do the bulk of their logistical planning in any kind of public forum or open Facebook group. They used a popular, and rather private, chat platform for gamers called Discord. After Charlottesville, Discord purged a number of accounts associated with the alt-right and the organizers of Unite the Right. “Discord’s mission is to bring people together around gaming,” the company stated after the march turned deadly. “We’re about positivity and inclusivity. Not hate. Not violence.” A year later, in the runup to an ultimately barely attended sequel to Unite the Right in D.C., organizers appeared to stay off the platform, opting instead to discuss logistics over Facebook Messenger and the encrypted texting app Signal. White-supremacist groups aren’t turning up publicly, in force, like they did in Charlottesville last year, but they’re still out there. And Discord in particular remains a very popular destination for communities of neo-Nazis and white supremacists to socialize, share hateful memes, boost the ideas that undergird their movements, inculcate strangers, and plan activities that take place elsewhere online. In the course of an afternoon, I found and joined more than 20 communities on the platform that were either directly about Nazism or white supremacy or reveled in sharing anti-Semitic and racist memes and imagery. “Discord is always on and always present among these groups on the far-right,” says Joan Donovan, the lead researcher on media manipulation at the Data & Society Research Institute. “It’s the place where they do most of the organizing of doxing and harassment campaigns.” Screenshot from Discord One reason that this might be worrying is that Discord is a far more important internet platform—especially for people who want to be part of hateful online communities—than its frequency in the headlines would suggest. Discord’s user base of more than 150 million may mostly consist of gamers chatting about gaming, but in certain corners of the platform, swastikas are exchanged like high-fives. The groups have names like “Nazism ’n’ Chill,” “Reich Lords,” “Rotten Reich,” “KKK of America,” “Oven Baked Jews,” and “Whitetopia.” They appear to have thousands of participants who trade memes and jokes, share links, condemn “social justice warriors,” and transmit the revisionist histories that bolster their rationalizations of Nazism and white supremacy. I found these communities mostly through Discord search sites (like Discordservers.com, Discord.me, and Disboard.org) as well as through invites posted in some of the Discord groups. Discord communities run on distinct, free servers, similar to the free workplaces offered by the work-communication app Slack. Within each server, which can be private or public, a group can set up discussion channels. A server can be home to two people or thousands of people, and in general, as with Slack, a Discord group isn’t discoverable without an invite. That relative privacy and ease of use—along with the fact that video games are as popular among young Americans on the far right as they are with just about everyone else—has made Discord an ideal place not only to gather like-minded people but also to recruit gamers with a shared interest in offensive memes. Screenshot from Discord Linger in almost any one of these chat spaces and you’ll see apparently seasoned members spewing bigoted speech freely throughout the day as well as newer members who appear to join the channel for the off-color jokes or were invited there by a community for fans of a (usually violent) game. In one server, named “KKK,” where participants implore each other to have “a nice white day,” one user dropped an invite to another server, writing, “Its like supporting hitler and i wanted to know if anyone of you wanted to join. but i doubt youre serious about kkk and stuff. most people are trolls. or just memeing.” In response, a couple of people in the “KKK” server asked if they could join and started a conversation about how much they hate black people. In certain corners of Discord, swastikas are exchanged like high-fives. Other servers are weirder but just as troubling. One, with about 112 members, brands itself as a place to play My Little Pony , but its name is a swastika with a heart on either side. The admin of the server’s name is Aryanne. There, someone who goes by the name “fuck ni****s” asked, “Is this a nazi server because I’m a nazi,” to which another member replied, with a photo of two Tyrannosaurus rexes having sex, “I hate jewish ni****s. and dumb zi**** heads. the jews are bad. hitler was good.” Another meme-centric server with about 160 members called “Crab Rave” has only one rule: “No rules on this server but if you do something jewish and I warn you and you do it again youll get spanked.” The server has a channel called “the-face-nazi-house,” which is filled with pictures of half-naked women partially dressed as Nazi soldiers. Still, it appears the server is generally a place to talk about video games. “Jew Discord” is a server that brands itself as a “Discord for Memes.” And on the Oven Baked Jews server with about 120 members, the admin describes it as a rather anodyne place: “Used for my Youtube but just a place to chill, play games, and art or what ever really. Even fucked up memes cuz why not.” Another server named “Some heavy african shit” offers a place for people who are “racist as fuk and you wanna make some problems.” Screenshot from Discord Other servers more explicitly exist to teach about Nazism and white supremacy. One, named “Path of GODS,” brands itself as a “Fascist Education Server,” imploring new members to “learn about Fascism and National Socialism here.” There are rules before joining, though. “No Jews, Muslims, Atheists, or Faggots,” reads rule No. 1. “If you are one of these you might as well leave because you’ll be kicked out otherwise.” I don’t fit the description but was able to subscribe anyway and search unlocked channels. I found posts with definitions of national socialism and fascism that purport to be copied from recent National Socialist Party literature, under which curious new members asked for more information. Another server called “Rotten Reich,” which boasts nearly 100 members, brands itself as the “Best neo-Nazi server, recruiting,” with the caveat “(satire, don’t get triggered).” One server, named “Identity,” contained a screenshot posted with people’s names and locations posted by a person who implored fellow members to “a doxx of a bunch of antifa people.” Another poster in the Identity server remarked to another user, “I’d be the first to sign up and help you slaughter Muslims.” What’s common among most of these groups is that they blur juvenile-seeming, semi-ironic meme making with outright racism—that is, they’re what experts on white supremacy recognize as on-ramps to indoctrination. This isn’t a new tactic for the far right. According to Donovan, the tactic was pioneered on Stormfront , the largest and oldest white-supremacist community on the internet, which was started in 1995 by Don Black, a former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. “On Stormfront, they would sometimes have paid moderators that are waiting there for when someone shows up and asks things like, ‘What is white nationalism? What do you guys really believe in?’ And then there were moderators there waiting to engage them when they showed interest in having a more serious discussion,” said Donovan. Screenshot from Discord Discord differs from Stormfront, as well as from the Facebook groups or YouTube chats where white nationalists and other hate groups like to gather, in a number of important ways. For one, unlike on Facebook, it’s incredibly easy to be anonymous on Discord. I didn’t see anybody using their real names. Moreover, unlike Stormfront—where people who are obviously interested in hate groups go—on Discord a lot of the participation comes from people who are mostly hoping to find an abasing joke or chat about violent video games safely without fear of offending someone. And that makes Discord an ideal place for far-right recruitment. Its spaces provide room for people to socialize in hate—to forge connections from which social beliefs can grow. If you hang out with Nazis and racists long enough, what begins as cruel humor can give way to a set of convictions, one that doesn’t need to be approached with a layer of irony. And unlike 4chan or Gab, other online social spaces where people who adhere to hateful beliefs can chat and coordinate freely, Discord doesn’t brand itself as a place for that. It’s mostly a place for privately chatting about games—and because of its structure, when people on Gab or 4chan want to take their conversations to more private places, the usual next step is to create a room on Discord. These meme rooms are “absolutely a path toward indoctrination,” says Keegan Hankes, a senior research analyst of the Southern Poverty Law Center. “You have people on like Andrew Anglin who state openly that all of their humor and all of their extremely base kind of vitriolic and in-your-face, no-attempt-to-hide-it racism is attempting to desensitize. Once they can get somebody to laugh at the Holocaust, it’s much easier to work backward and get them to think that white people are being oppressed systemically by Jews and people of color, is their argument.” When I sent Discord the list of servers I found, the company would only say on the record that it investigated the list and took action against those that violated its terms of service. “Discord has a Terms of Service and Community Guidelines that we ask all of our communities and users to adhere to,” a spokesperson said in a statement. “These specifically prohibit harassment, threatening messages, or calls to violence. Though we do not read people’s private messages, we do investigate and take immediate appropriate action against any reported ToS violation by a server or user.” In Discord’s terms of service , the company does say that it doesn’t actively monitor servers and instead relies on user reports. But it’s not clear how hard the company looked into the list of servers I asked it to comment on. The server with the long list of anti-fascist activists posted by a user to encourage doxing, for example, is still active, and the list is still on Discord. And almost all of the Discord servers I found with blatantly anti-Semitic and racist names were still active late last week. It’s hard to tell if any that I found were taken down, since I was kicked out of a few and some may have changed their names. How a company like Discord should deal with this activity isn’t necessarily obvious. Discord doesn’t have the resources of Facebook or Twitter, which have drawn a clearer line of what kinds of speech and activity they tolerate on their platforms, and Discord most likely can’t dedicate large teams to building machine learning tools aimed at ferreting out hate; it’s also designed for private, not public, conversations. Still, Discord has no obligation to allow its users to use slurs in the names of their groups, to “joke” about killing Jews, or certainly to encourage each other to harass and dox. Right now, all of these things are incredibly easy to find on Discord. And the company doesn’t appear to have thought very hard about why that is.
Correction, Oct. 9, 2018: Due to a production error, the image at the top of this post originally incorrectly depicted swastikas. The image has been replaced.

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