Why Twitter’s #HimToo mother and son saga was a satisfying social media moment.

People Ages 27 to 45 Can Now Get the HPV Vaccine. But Will Insurance Cover It? It was a social media saga that took the form of a three-act play: First a mother’s politicized Twitter post about her son, featuring a picture of him posed ridiculously and her complaints about his lack of dating life due to “the current climate of false sexual accusations,” went viral. Soon it inspired a wave of parodies: people posting about their “sons’ ” problems in the “current climate.” ( Marty McFly can’t go on dates because his mother made a pass at him at prom! ) Then the actual son at the center of it all spoke up to clarify that he had no idea what his mom was talking about. What a weird confluence of events involving a bunch of people we had never heard of until five seconds ago! Girl, no. That isn’t why. #HimToo https://t.co/tMIYh3xF5o — Holly Fιɢυeroα O’Reιlly (@AynRandPaulRyan) October 8, 2018 The original post, since deleted along with the account that posted it, read as follows: “This is MY son. He graduated #1 in boot camp. He was awarded the USO award. He was #1 in A school. He is a gentleman who respects women. He won’t go on solo dates due to the current climate of false sexual accusations by radical feminists with an axe to grind. I VOTE. #HimToo.” The indignant tone was accompanied by a picture of a young man in a Navy uniform, posing theatrically with one leg up on a bench and his chin resting on a fist. That the post would get pilloried was all too predictable: Here was an apparent conservative trying to make the argument that the #MeToo movement had gone too far and illustrating why with a very specific example: how it is affecting her very nice son. If someone who was in the Navy and No. 1 in boot camp can’t “go on solo dates,” which is a wonderful way of phrasing it, what is this world coming to? This type of bluster is common on social media, but the details made the post especially ripe to be remixed and memed. People started posting pictures of their sons, aka random things that they were calling their sons, which included the kid from The Sixth Sense , Donald Trump Jr., and some “sons” that were technically animals, among others. This is MY son. He graduated #1 in Army. He is a gentleman who respects women. He won’t go on solo dates due to the current climate of false sexual accusations by radical feminists with an axe to grind. I VOTE. #HimToo pic.twitter.com/sZYQyg72of — No Dana, only Zuul Schwartz (@DanaSchwartzzz) October 8, 2018 This is MY son. He graduated 1st in his drawing class. He respects women & has a keen sixth sense. He doesn’t go on solo dates with women because he doesn’t know if they’re alive or not. I VOTE. #HimToo pic.twitter.com/smyGUPK8Rv — Simar (@sahluwal) October 9, 2018 This is my son. He is a gentleman who treats ladies with respect. He’s afraid to date right now because of the current climate. Seriously, because of the actual climate his future kids won’t be able to survive. I vote. #HimToo pic.twitter.com/pxefN68aNZ — Luna Malbroux (@LunaisAmerica) October 9, 2018 This is MY son. He graduated #1 in boot camp. He is the strongest Avenger. He broke Harlem. I VOTE. #HimToo pic.twitter.com/AOaYJlL6TT — Ashley C. Ford (@iSmashFizzle) October 8, 2018 This is my son. He’s a large adult holding an enormous gun. Sometimes he kills elephants for fun. Is he even divorced yet? He thinks he’s the future of the Republican Party. He once dmed with Julian Assange. #HimToo pic.twitter.com/7Lt3EyDyI4 — Molly Jong☠️Fast (@MollyJongFast) October 9, 2018 This is MY son. He graduated second to last in flying camp. He successfully swallowed salmon today. He is a gentleman who respects – nay, deserves women. He wont go on solo dates due to the current climate of false sexual accusations, and also bc hes emotionally stunted #HimToo pic.twitter.com/TDLweUjpHJ — Emlyn Crenshaw (@emlyncrenshaw) October 8, 2018 What took this story from medium-amusing to transcendent, though, was when the original son in question showed up on Twitter. His name is Pieter Hanson, and his Twitter handle? @Thatwasmymom. That was my Mom. Sometimes the people we love do things that hurt us without realizing it. Let’s turn this around. I respect and #BelieveWomen . I never have and never will support #HimToo . I’m a proud Navy vet, Cat Dad and Ally. Also, Twitter, your meme game is on point. pic.twitter.com/yZFkEjyB6L — Pieter Hanson (@Thatwasmymom) October 9, 2018 In responding, Hanson cast doubt on his mother’s claims in a kind, gentle way usually not seen on social media. He wasn’t here to clap back at his mother but to say that “Sometimes the people we love do things that hurt us without realizing it,” which is indisputably true. Mimicking the silly pose from the original tweet was a disarming touch and show of good humor. Taken in sum, Hanson pulled off a rare feat: He reclaimed his narrative and, flouting the unofficial rule that any suddenly notable person on the internet is probably worse than you think, accomplished what the Verge termed the “ reverse milkshake duck ”: Instead of a viral hero being revealed as less-than-heroic when his racist, sexist, homophobic, or otherwise offensive posts surfaced, here was a viral villain outed as, despite it all, a righteous hero. Hanson’s response was an excellent reminder of one crucial and too-often-forgotten fact of social media: When you post about someone, sometimes they will respond, and they may have a very different take on things! Simple as it is, this actually amounts to something of a checks-and-balances function in a world where truth seems more slippery than ever—though there are many reasons to question the concept of Twitter as a “truth machine,” there’s a reason that idea caught in the first place. If that’s too lofty, then Hanson’s response is also, at the very least, a cautionary tale for social media–happy parents everywhere.

Read More…

Magic Leap is real and it’s a janky marvel

Magic Leap is real and it’s a janky marvel Voila! After $2.3B, the AR headset gets its big debut Jonathan Shieber @jshieber / 1 day After years of speculation , some mockery , and more than a little befuddlement, the Magic Leap augmented headset is arriving in the hands of developers and users — and its first product is a somewhat janky piece of magic.
Magic Leap Announces Its Augmented Reality Developer Platform
The company’s first developer conference is slated for tomorrow, with a keynote bright and early in the morning, but the $2.3 billion dollar augmented reality headset manufacturer let a slew of VIPs, media types (including your humble reporter) take a look at the first official content partnerships to come from its formerly super secret studios.
Development studios like Weta Workshop (whose partnership began with Magic Leap nearly a decade ago) and Wingnut AR (the augmented reality development studio founded by Peter Jackson ) have revealed new games that involve battling robots and spider infestations (respectively); while the medical imaging company Brainlab and the direct to consumer furniture retailer and design consulting service, Wayfair, pitched their augmented reality wares to show the business use case for Magic Leap’s magic leap into virtual reality.
In all some sixteen companies pitched demos at the curtain-raising event today.
Earlier this afternoon Weta just debuted their augmented reality game as a preview to the Magic Leap conference and it’s impressive. The robot battling Dr. Grordbort’s Invaders is the clearest vision of what Magic Leap’s platform can do.
Magic Leap teased the two companies’ vision for what immersive augmented game play could like in its promotional materials for years, but the culmination of the development work the two have undertaken is about three to five hours of gameplay battling robots that appear from the walls and floors and doors of any room. It’s (pardon the easy pun) magic.
According to Weta games director Greg Broadmore, the final game is the result of six years of collaboration between the creative studio and Magic Leap.
Rony Abovitz, Magic Leap’s visionary chief executive, first reached out to Weta with a vision for “Our Blue” a far-reaching, immersive, science fiction-influenced immersive world that Abovitz wanted Weta to help realize. Abovitz kept in touch with the Weta team and as he began putting the pieces together for Magic Leap, brought the studio on board to develop content.
Dr. Grodbort’s is the first fruits of that partnership and it’s pretty stunning.
Setting aside the problems that Magic Leap still has with field of view and with slight glitches in the game mechanics (which could entirely have been the fault of this author), Dr. Grordbort’s lays out the Magic Leap headset as a convincing gaming device (albeit at a somewhat price-prohibitive $2,295 apiece.
In the game, users are given a backstory by the eponymous Dr. Grordbort, who informs players that they’re the last best hope to save the world from a robotic alien invasion. From there on in, it’s about picking up a blaster and shooting the potential robot invaders who appear from portals around a room.
To start the game, a user maps their space by wandering around it with the Magic Leap on. Once the device has the lay of the land ( a process that can take up to four minutes — depending on size) the narrative will commence and the user is drawn into Dr. Grordbort’s world and gameplay.
“The game helped shape the platform,” said Brodmore. “Dr. Grordbort’s was the problem and Magic Leap is the solution.”
Without the close relationship to Magic Leap that Weta enjoyed, the game from Wingnut’s studio was far less robust, but no less enjoyable.
In their first foray into Magic Leap’s world, the augmented reality studio created a game that puts the user into the most bizarre job training session they’ve ever experienced.
As the new hire at an extermination company that deals with some fairly vicious and viscous insects, the user is put through some paces with how to kill virtual bugs in real space. The mapping engines and graphics are exceptional, the narrator walking a user through the game shows off Magic Leap’s exceptional use of sound technology and the humor in the game is reminiscent of some of the best Wallace and Gromit set pieces.
Beginning with a simple bat, and working up through a flamethrower, players were instructed in how to kill various creepy crawlies and concoct a serum to attract others. I’m not a fan of first person shooters (or much of a gamer in general), but that Wingnut game was damn fun.
And if gaming was one side of the spell that Magic Leap was hoping to weave with new users, business use cases were the other.
In partnership with Brainlab, the company is trying to show how its toolkit can be used in both educational and operational theaters for physicians and surgeons. In a demonstration users were encourage to take a look at a replica of a brain tumor patient’s brain scan in three dimensions. The device is aimed at helping doctors plan surgeries and understand the potential ramifications of different approaches to removing growths in a brain.
Meanwhile, the retailer Wayfair put users through a demonstration of its first Magic Leap application. A visualization tool that takes furniture from a virtual showroom into the real space that furniture would occupy.
It’s part of a longterm skunkworks development project set up within the online retailer to explore applications for augmented reality in a bit to sell more stuff to more folks without the need for a physical showroom (although Wayfair has launched a few popups earlier this month )
Behind all of this is a simple truth. Magic Leap needs content — almost as much as it needed to reduce the form factor and improve the usability of its first headset.
It has achieved those last two demands above the expectations of even the most hardened critic. Wearables still look goofy, but they feel good and the pack that powers the Magic Leap experience is among the best — lightweight and wearable, and with a three-hour battery charge, among the best in the industry.
There’s still some assembly required, as a user needs to determine the type of headset they’ll need and select a nosebridge that gives the headset the proper lift so its hardware can work properly. If a user wears glasses, it’s going to require a special prescription that can be ordered separately as an attachment that fits into the headset.
The other pieces of hardware packaged with the Magic Leap include a motion sensing hand controller (similar to what users have experienced as part of any video game console) and a hip pack with the processing power of a notebook computer.
The device doesn’t need to be tethered to a computer, but it does only work indoors.
Setting aside the limitations of the first generation of a hardware device, the Magic Leap is about as impressive a piece of augmented or virtual reality hardware as I’ve seen. Other companies may have better fields of view and a more compact device , but they lack the variety of content that makes Magic Leap’s offerings shine. The early partnerships the company has inked have, indeed, paid off.
Google Will Now Educate Glass Explorers Over Hangouts, No Barge Necessary
Its initial customers — in Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, San Francisco, and Seattle — will receive a home visit from a Magic Leap employee who will walk them through the way the product works in a thirty minute to sixty minute demo. That’s the same level of bespoke treatment that Google Glass offered to its initial explorers.
One benefit of an AR headset like Magic Leap’s is that it’s much, much easier to navigate than a fully immersive VR headset. Another, is the flexibility it offers in terms of applications from a mixed reality setting. “This is the evolution of computing,” said Shrenik Sadaigi, the director of next generation experiences at Wayfair — and the architect of the company’s experiments in augmented and virtual reality. “We think of this as a productivity device,” Sadaigi said. “Browsing for stuff on the web. That’s the computing environment. Your space is your screen and your space becomes another variable on the computing platform. We want to make people love the space they live in. Using mixed reality to … the app that we’re presenting today we think of it as a design experience.”
One of the big breakthroughs in the company’s platform is the controller and how easy it is to use, as Sadaigi noted in our conversation. “The controller is doing a lot of work for you. [The company] is giving you something new… that is kind of the old, but in a new form. It’s simplified the experience to swiping and clicking.”
More complicated interactions can be handled by using the voice interface the company has built into the device and the eye scrolling feature that’s part of the inside out tracking the company uses.
Behind all of this is Abovitz and his crazy vision for a new platform for computing.
“That decision to start something new and bigger and more ambitious, to try to change all of computing, was a bit nuts. It’s like Bilbo Baggins having to step out of the Shire,” Abovitz told VentureBeat earlier this year . “If you spend enough hours in a Magic Leap system, it’s almost impossible to go back to your phone or computer or television. You realize that they’re very thin slices. Magic Leap gives you a giant volume of computing. When you actually get to play with it, spatial computing means you work within a volume, not just a slice.”

Read More…

Listen to the “CBS This Morning” podcast

CBS News October 10, 2018, 10:33 AM Listen to the “CBS This Morning” podcast Email
Last Updated Oct 10, 2018 10:33 AM EDT
Start your day with award-winning co-hosts Gayle King, Norah O’Donnell, Bianna Golodryga and John Dickerson in Studio 57, as they bring you the most important headlines, intelligent conversations and world-class original reporting from around the world.
From news of the day, to extended interviews and podcast originals, you can tune in on multiple platforms.
You can email us your questions, comments and suggestions at .
Latest “CBS This Morning” Podcast original: Author Michael Lewis on the chaos of the 2016 presidential transition
Only on the “CBS This Morning” podcast, best-selling author Michael Lewis joins “CBS This Morning” co-host Gayle King to discuss his new book, “The Fifth Risk,” which covered the federal transition between President Obama and President Trump’s administrations.
Lewis discusses the reporting entailed in writing the book, why he was surprised by what he encountered and why he believes President Trump “likes operating in chaos.” Lewis also answered whether his latest book will be adapted to into a movie like his other bestsellers – “Moneyball,” “Blind Side,” and “The Big Short.” Archive of “CBS This Morning” Original podcasts:
Enhancing the Restaurant Experience | Audio
Actress Kathleen Turner Bluntly Reflects On Her Career | Audio
Former Cisco chairman John Chambers on the need to evolve and disrupt or get left behind | Audio
Duels, canings & armed members of Congress. The fighting on Capitol Hill that lead to the Civil War. | Audio
Former super-agent Michael Ovitz on winning at all cost | Audio
Olympian Michael Phelps on mental health, fatherhood and defining himself | Audio
Author Gary Shteyngart on traveling the country via Greyhound and becoming a watch geek | Audio
New novel takes readers inside secret world of Harvard’s private all-male clubs | Audio
Looking at the culture of sexual assault at elite, privileged schools | Audio
Afghan war vet on running for public office | Audio
How to Make Our Schools Safe | Audio
British Prime Minister Theresa May on relationship with President Trump and Brexit | Audio
Puerto Rico: One Year After Hurricane Maria | Audio
An Outlaw of Literature: Author James Frey Reflects on Life, Career and Critics | Audio
Black Lives Matter Activist DeRay McKesson Makes The Case For Hope | Audio
Previewing the Emmy Awards | Audio
Recipe to become your own boss | Audio
Telling Stories From Behind Bars | Audio
The Quest to Build a Heart | Audio
Should You Track Your Kids? | Audio
Trigger Warnings and Safe Spaces Harm, Not Help | Audio
NCI Director on the need for more research on e-cigarettes | Audio
Drinking Wine and Talking True Crime | Audio
Breaking Down the Bull Market, Trade and Elon Musk’s recent moves | Audio
Sen. Lindsey Graham reflects on Sen. John McCain’s legacy | Audio
Ex-NSA contractor, Reality Winner, 1st interview since leaking classified docs | Audio
Reflecting on Playwright Neil Simon’s Career and Legacy | Audio
Oscar Health CEO on using tech to change the health care industry | Audio
David Letterman on lending a helping hand | Audio
Actress Judith Light on latest Emmy nomination, Transparent and advocating for the LGTBQ community | Audio
Football and Samoa, The Perfect Match | Audio
Telling the America’s Immigrant Story | Audio
Ask A Manager: Tips on navigating the workplace | Audio
Dopesick: The reality of America’s opioid crisis | Audio
Putting My Faith in Beyoncé: Life as a Black, Gay Southern Man in America | Audio
David Sedaris on his family and writing what you know | Audio
New Novel Explores Healing Power Of Friendship | Audio
The potential impact of millennial women in the midterm elections | Audio
The Forgotten History of Female Aviators | Audio
Preview of the 100th PGA Championship | Audio
Clinton’s Impeachment gets the Slow Burn treatment | Audio
NYT correspondent on how Egypt sets trends in politics and culture across the Arab world | Audio
Coming Home: How service members adjust to life after deployment | Audio
Why are Millennials quitting their lucrative jobs to travel? | Audio
Hear from the man behind 3D-printed guns | Audio
Alan Alda on his Parkinson’s diagnosis and new podcast focusing on communication | Audio
Fighting to liberate Iranian women | Audio
The Weakening Of America’s Democracy | Audio
Why is the U.S. the most dangerous place to give birth in the developed world? | Audio
Father of Parkland shooting survivors joins fight to prevent mass shootings | Audio
Life after a wrongful conviction | Audio
Duck Boat Survivor Speaks Out After Losing Her Dad and Brother | Audio
7 books for your summer reading list that aren’t your typical beach read | Audio
New White House Memoir Mixes Business With Pleasure | Audio
Rolling Stone’s evolution | Audio
Broadway star on her first Tony Award | Audio
Dissecting President Trump’s Foreign Trip | Audio
Preview of the World Cup Final: Croatia vs France | Audio
The Fight for Women’s Rights: Gloria Allred’s Crusade | Audio
The tech world beyond Silicon Valley | Audio
How to talk to your kids about healthy video game use | Audio
Pod Save America’s Dan Pfeiffer on Trump, Obama and the future of the Democratic Party | Audio
The guilt, grief, and unexpected gifts of care giving | Audio
Jackie, Janet and Lee: Three Women’s Quests For Money And Power | Audio
Discussing vaping and e-cigs with your teen | Audio
Telling the Story of Curtis Flowers | Audio
Capital Gazette Shooting Survivor Speaks Out | Audio
How genealogy websites could compromise your privacy | Audio
GLAAD calls for constitutional amendment to protect LGBTQ community | Audio
Tracy Morgan on comedy, fatherhood, and overcoming pain | Audio
Understanding Suicide and Working to Prevent It | Audio
Dr. LaPook and Dr. Agus on what patients should know | Audio
Teaching refugee and immigrant students | Audio
Ultrarunner Scott Jurek and His Wife, Jenny, On Racing Toward Dreams | Audio
What makes a family? New novel tackles gender, race and parenthood | Audio
Building a life resume one experience at a time | Audio
Permission to Have Feelings, the Power of Emotions | Audio
Previewing the 2018 FIFA World Cup | Audio
Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds: The Life and Death of Two Hollywood Legends | Audio
A glimpse inside the Obama White House | Audio
Tackling life’s challenges with inner fortitude | Audio
The challenges, stakes, and delicate diplomatic dance of the North Korea summit | Audio
Harry Hadden-Paton on his Broadway debut and Tony Award nomination | Audio
“Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” stars on their life-changing roles | Audio
Robert F. Kennedy’s Funeral Train: The People’s View | Audio
Oprah picks former death row inmate’s memoir for her book club | Audio
How Sweetgreen made salad ‘cool’ using data and storytelling | Audio
Author Dave Eggers and Mokhtar Alkhanshali on coffee culture and the crisis in Yemen | Audio
Carnival Cruise President on handling crises at sea and cruising to Havana | Audio
The science behind Kilauea volcano eruptions | Audio
How Twitter has Destroyed Comedy | Audio
The Evolution of the Presidency | Audio
The Truth About Animals | Audio
Iraq vet on helping veterans transition into the workforce | Audio
The Tale of “Roxanne, Roxanne” | Audio
Facing Life After Cancer | Audio
Temple Grandin on the importance of making stuff with your hands | Audio
What Is Time? | Audio
The Potential of Solar Power and How to Harness It | Audio
Former Russian Amb. McFaul on Putin, Trump, Obama and Medvedev | Audio
Questlove on being creative | Audio
Louie Anderson on becoming friends with your mother | Audio
Why you should not seek a tan this summer | Audio
Ronan Farrow on the fate of American diplomacy and winning the Pulitzer Prize | Audio
From intern to designer, Zac Posen on the Met Gala | Audio
Making sneakers from wool and trees, the story behind Allbirds | Audio
From Upstate N.Y. to War-Torn Sudan, a Doctor’s Journey | Audio
The Story Behind “Empire on Blood” | Audio
Hunting Tornadoes in the Sky | Audio
Author Jacqueline Woodson on reading like a writer | Audio
Why Airbnb is joining the concert business | Audio
Grand Strategy: From Octavian Augustus and Machiavelli to Lincoln and FDR | Audio
The Future of Putin and Reflecting on Stalin’s Gulags | Audio
Meg Wolitzer on her new book, feminism and the importance of mentors | Audio
Cecile Richards on advocating for the underdog and overcoming self-doubt | Audio
Alzheimer’s: It’s impact, the science and it’s future | Audio
Cuba’s Transition of Power | Audio
Unified: Friendship Trumps Politics with Sen. Scott and Rep. Gowdy | Audio
How Pope Francis is pushing the limits and the future of Catholicism | Audio
“Nod Less and Cry More,” says “Dear Madam President” author Jennifer Palmieri | Audio
Silicon Valley’s Jimmy O. Yang on pursuing comedy | Audio
Singer Brett Young on giving country music a new sound | Audio
Country singer Carly Pearce making music for the everyday woman | Audio
Barging into the Hollywood Boys’ Club with Humor | Audio
Elizabeth Smart: Nearly 16 Years Later | Audio
Hillsong Church’s founder on the church’s success and his biggest personal disappointment | Audio
New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu on race, family and 2020 | Audio
Previewing the 82nd Masters Tournament | Audio
MLK, The Man, In His Final Years | Audio
The Fight for Trans Equality | Audio
Counting Crows’ Adam Duritz on 25 years of making music and new tour | Audio
Pop sensation Grace VanderWaal on her evolving sound and fame | Audio
Derek Jeter on being a team owner, the future of baseball and fatherhood | Audio
Simplicity and Transparency: Keys to Preventing a Meltdown | Audio
Remembering Comedy Legend Garry Shandling | Audio
Social psychologist Amy Cuddy on body-mind effects, the science behind it and critics | Audio
Traveling outside your comfort zone with Rick Steves | Audio
Karen and Charlotte Pence on their new children’s book and being America’s Second Family | Audio | Video
Puerto Rico 6 Months After Hurricane Maria | Audio
Journalist and author Anna Quindlen on new novel and the “Me Too” movement | Audio
Olympian Scott Hamilton explains why you have to fall in order to win | Audio
Helping the next generation of tech engineers and entrepreneurs | Audio
Pay Attention: Putting your Phone Down | Audio
March Madness Predictions | Audio
Nightmares. Death. Dehumanization. Life of a Border Patrol agent | Audio
Etsy COO on the power of women in e-commerce | Audio
The gift of the Enlightenment | Audio
Weird and morbid medical treatments | Audio
Univision’s Jorge Ramos on DACA and criticism of President Trump and Obama | Audio
A preview of the 90th Academy Awards | Audio | Video
How young, educated, unmarried women are shaping the future of China | Audio
Author Tara Westover’s journey from off-the-grid childhood to becoming “Educated” | Audio
How much of your information is being collected by Facebook and Google? | Audio
Bestselling Instapoet Rupi Kaur on feminism, being a woman of color | Audio
Actress Anna Deavere Smith on her new HBO film and the Parkland student activists | Audio
Author Jodi Picoult on her novel “Small Great Things” and tackling race | Audio
Inside Israel’s Targeted Assassinations | Audio
Would you want to know the date of your death? | Audio
Timing is key says author Daniel Pink | Audio
Olympic skier Gus Kenworthy on coming out, being a role model, and his post-Olympics plans | Audio
Defining Modern Love | Audio Audio
Mastering the dating game and understanding what makes couples happy with eHarmony’s CEO | Audio
The key to a long, successful marriage | Audio
John Lithgow on his new play, “Stories by Heart,” and playing Churchill | Audio
Understanding Virtual Reality | Audio
The science behind the flu with. Dr. David Agus | Audio
Why words matter with author Kelly Corrigan | Audio
How telling your kids “NO” can be detrimental to their development | Audio
Two Dope Queens with Gayle King | Audio
How telling your kids “NO” can be detrimental to their development | Audio
The History of the State of the Union address | Audio
Making 3D printers accessible to all | Audio
Previewing Sunday’s Grammy Awards | Audio
What makes a YouTube video go viral | Audio
Behind the HQ Trivia phenomenon with host Scott Rogowsky and co-founder Rus Yusupov | Audio
Tips for changing and improving your professional life in 2018 | Audio
Tackling the disability of poor vision in underdeveloped countries | Audio
Meet “CBS This Morning’s” new co-host John Dickerson | Audio
CBS News foreign correspondent Liz Palmer on covering Syria, Russia | Audio
1949: The Birth of Modern China | Audio
Tips for parents on keeping their New Year’s resolution | Audio
Planet Fitness CEO on making the gym a welcoming place for all | Audio
Previewing Sunday’s Golden Globe Awards | Audio
A.J. Finn on new psychological thriller, “The Woman in the Window” | Audio
Southwest CEO Gary Kelly on being a disruptive force in the industry and the new tax bill | Audio
Keys to eating healthier, losing weight and living better in 2018 | Audio
Having the willpower to keep your New Year’s resolution | Audio
NYT’s Kantor and Twohey on breaking Weinstein story and the conversation it sparked | Audio
Drugs, disco and debauchery: Miami in the 70s | Audio
How to change the culture of Silicon Valley and startups to become more inclusive | Audio
Lionel Richie reflects on his fifty-year career and being a father | Audio
Advice on discussing sexual harassment and mass shootings with children | Audio
Gloria Estefan on working with her husband, returning to Cuba and President Trump | Audio
Norman Lear: The Family Man | Audio
What the repeal of Net Neutrality means for you | Audio
Helping to take care of “society’s most vulnerable” | Audio
MailChimp CEO on the power of small businesses | Audio
Sandy Hook 5 Years Later: A mother remembers her son and works on prevention | Audio
When the holidays hurt, how to deal with suffering and find healing | Audio
The story behind theSkimm | Audio
Dancing to the edge and back, David Hallberg on his new memoir | Audio
What’s driving the change in Saudi Arabia | Audio
Psychologist Meg Jay on resilience and overcoming adversity | Audio
Travel editor on the holiday travel season, the Caribbean and places to visit in 2018 | Audio
CBS News correspondents Elaine Quijano and DeMarco Morgan recount covering Hurricanes Irma and Harvey | Audio
Jane Pauley on her ground-breaking career and hosting “Sunday Morning” | Audio
Pulitzer-prize winning author Jennifer Egan on her new novel, “Manhattan Beach” | Audio
Basketball legend Shaq and Ring CEO on their partnership and not being deterred rejection Audio
What you need to know about Black Friday and Cyber Monday | Audio
How to survive Thanksgiving with your family | Audio
Esperanza Spalding on her new album, the special meaning of the number 7 and her Grammy moment | Audio
Inside America’s fascination with the assassination of JFK and conspiracy theories | Audio
“Louis the Child” on the state of electronic music, their future & the power of SoundCloud | Audio
The story behind the Backpage.com investigation | Audio
Why Millennials are underpaid, overworked, and under appreciated | Audio
School segregation and diversity with New York Times Magazine’s Nikole Hannah-Jones | Audio
Analyzing President Trump’s Asia Trip | Audio
The female code breakers who helped win World War II | Audio
Malcolm Gladwell on driverless, autonomous vehicles | Audio
Understanding human behavior and social norms | Audio
How former NFL player Ryan O’Callaghan’s “Note to Self” came together | Audio
“Young Sheldon” star, Iain Armitage, on making the role his own | Audio
Understanding Open Enrollment for ACA’s Health Care Exchanges | Audio
The siblings behind “IT” and “Jigsaw,” this year’s biggest horror films | Audio
Former undocumented immigrant on becoming a MacArthur Genius and the future of DACA | Audio
Dr. David Agus explains gene therapy and it’s potential | Audio
Nicholas Kristof on the North Korea threat and the opioid crisis | Audio
Author Jason Reynolds discusses new novel with Gayle King | Audio
Comedian Patton Oswalt on the loss of his wife, finding love again and the future of comedy | Audio
Pussy Riot founding member on her imprisonment, Putin and the NFL take-a-knee protest | Audio
What five extraordinary leaders during turbulent times can teach today’s leaders | Audio
Dr. David Agus on Breast Cancer | Audio
Advice on parenting teenagers with child psychologist Lisa Damour | Audio
Charlie, Norah and Gayle find out the best way to get a good night’s sleep | Audio
Resisting extremism in Africa with author Alexis Okeowo | Audio
Surfer Laird Hamilton and director Rory Kennedy on their new documentary | Audio
CBS News’ David Begnaud on covering the crisis in Puerto Rico | Audio
What Equifax’s security breach means for you | Audio
Understanding the Republican tax reform proposal | Audio
Erin Moriarty on 30 years of “48 Hours” and the show’s new podcast | Audio
Ellen Pao on her new book and the red flags she missed | Audio
Understanding the 2017 Hurricane Season | Audio
Investor and “Principles” author Ray Dalio on the keys to success, meditation, and creativity | Audio
Advice on raising preteens with CBS News contributor and child psychologist Lisa Damour | Audio
Fall TV Preview with Variety’s Sonia Saraiya | Audio
Emmy Awards preview | Audio
Brené Brown on her new book, “Braving the Wilderness: The Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone” | Audio
Steve Bannon on Clinton, the Republicans and election night | Audio
Excerpt of Dan Brown’s new book, “Origin” | Audio
Ken Follett on his new book, “A Column of Fire” | Audio
Making sense of the market with Jill Schlesinger | Audio
Author of “Happiness: The Crooked Little Road to Semi-Ever After” | Audio
Solar eclipse: What you need to know | Audio
A More Perfect Union: The People’s Supper | Audio
Peter Greenberg on travel industry | Audio
Advice on raising kids ages 6 to 10 years old from CBS News contributor and child psychologist Lisa Damour | Audio
Uber’s Chief Brand Officer speaks out about the company’s problems and her journey to Silicon Valley | Audio
Iranian foreign minister on sanctions, Trump and travel ban | Audio
Co-host Norah O’Donnell and team on interviewing South Korean President Moon Jae-In and Exploring Seoul | Audio
The growing popularity of Danish cuisine | Audio
The magic of meatloaf with Frank Bruni and Jennifer Steinhauer of the New York Times | Audio © 2018 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Read More…