James Gunn At DC Proves Disney Made A Big Mistake | ScreenRant

advertising James Gunn moving to DC proves that Disney made a mistake in firing him. Gunn had spent the last six years dedicating most of his time to the Marvel Cinematic Universe. He directed two Guardians of the Galaxy movies and made Disney over $1.5 billion in doing so. But, any goodwill he’d built up was thrown away when Disney fired him as the director of Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 .
Disney fired Gunn after old tweets resurfaced at the center of a personal and political attack on him. The tweets contained Gunn’s previous attempts at shock humor, but the backlash against them coming back to light was too much for Disney to withstand. They swiftly fired him and the decision hasn’t been one that all parties have agreed on. While some believe Disney had no other option, the Guardians of the Galaxy cast themselves signed a letter supporting the matured man who Gunn is today. However, they’re standing by their decision and will not be bringing Gunn back to direct Guardians 3 , no matter how many fans or cast members would support it.
Related: Why Disney Isn’t Rehiring James Gunn For Guardians of the Galaxy 3
Since Gunn wasn’t coming back to complete his trilogy, he was free to move on and so he has. It was recently reported that Gunn will write and possibly direct Suicide Squad 2 for Warner Bros. and DC. His hiring on another major superhero movie less than three months after his original firing shows where WB and DC stand, but also proves that Disney’s decision to fire him in the first place was a mistake.
This Page: Disney Totally Mishandled James Gunn’s Firing Page 2: Gunn Still Had a Future With Marvel – But Probably Not Anymore
advertising Disney Acted Too Fast in Firing James Gunn
Disney decided to fire James Gunn from Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 just hours after the controversy around the decade-old tweets began. What they didn’t seem to know at the time was that those tweets had been brought to light by political activist Mike Cernovich because of Gunn’s repeated criticisms about Donald Trump. Gunn apologized for his past offensive style back when he was initially hired for the first Guardians movie and was quick to make another public apology in light of this attack. However, it didn’t matter to Disney as they fired him shortly after his apology was published.
advertising The problem for Disney wasn’t just the decision to fire Gunn, but they did it without truly assessing the situation. While Disney CEO Bob Iger says the decision to fire Gunn was a unanimous one that he still stands by, it was still a move made in the heat of the controversy. Disney similarly acted quickly in canceling Roseanne following another racist remark by Roseanne Barr, but the difference between these two instances is large. Gunn’s tweets were old attempts at comedy that don’t reflect who he is now, while Barr’s tweets were made in the here and now and reflected her current personal worldviews. Disney treated them as if they were the same when they are in fact not.
Related: Disney Not Rehiring James Gunn Is a Big Mistake For Marvel (And Beyond)
Disney still could’ve made this same decision, but allowing some time to pass to investigate the tweets themselves, why they resurfaced, and to meet with Gunn could’ve resulted in an entirely different outcome. Indeed, the company didn’t even sit down with Gunn before firing him, only having what was described as a ” courtesy meeting ” with him afterward to discuss his return , which Disney chairman Alan Horn wasn’t interested in… right now.
Disney Didn’t Actually Want to Get Rid of Gunn Entirely
Making matters even more complicated are the various reports regarding Disney and Marvel’s actual stance on Gunn and his future. As the days past by after his firing, there were multiple reports that Gunn could in some way make a return to Marvel down the road. Coming back to direct Guardians 3 looked to be a long shot, but other future movies appeared to be on the table. If this is true, then Disney didn’t really want to get rid of Gunn and his firing was instead done to create separation between them as the situation cooled.
advertising Read More: Why Disney Fired James Gunn As Director But Kept Him As a Writer
In fact, Disney likely won’t be able to get rid of Gunn anyways, so finding a way to bring him back made sense. Thanks to the WGA crediting system, there is no easy way out of Gunn getting credit on Guardians 3 and any subsequent movies that the Guardians may appear in. Possibly because of this, it has been reported and further stated by Sean Gunn that Marvel will keep Gunn’s script for the next Guardians film . They would basically have to have an entirely new cast of characters and story for the third film for Gunn not to receive story by credit anyways, and even then it isn’t guaranteed, so it is simply easier to use what they paid for. And, it also guarantees that Gunn’s larger vision for the core characters will be fulfilled as he envisioned. That’s a consolation prize at best, as it will be up someone else to deliver on his take.

Read More…

Staying Focused in a Noisy Open Office

retales botijero/Getty Images Let’s face it: The open office can be a nightmare, especially when you’re working on something that requires your undivided attention. To make matters worse, your colleagues can be distracting — maybe they’re having loud conversations or their cell phones are constantly chirping. How can you make peace with your open office? How should you handle loud coworkers who are disturbing your focus? What’s the best way to cope with the noise and distractions in your office without coming across as antisocial or rude?
What the Experts Say
There is an ongoing debate about the pros and cons of open offices. Some research indicates they spark creativity and camaraderie, while newer studies suggest that open offices encourage employees to avoid one another. When designed well , these spaces can foster collaboration by “offering opportunities for serendipitous interactions with people all over the company,” says David Burkus, an associate professor at Oral Roberts University and the author of the forthcoming book Friend of a Friend . The trouble is, all those interactions “can be very distracting” when you’re trying to get work done. But as companies increasingly adopt an open layout, it’s important to learn how to deal with unwanted noise, says Karen Dillon, the author of the HBR Guide to Office Politics . You need your own “survival strategies” as well as some ground rules that you and your team can agree to. Here are some ideas.
Embrace the positives
We all crave some solitude in the workplace . After all, there’s a certain level of psychological safety that comes with having an “office with a door,” says Dillon. That modicum of privacy ensures that “your colleagues can’t overhear your phone calls” or know precisely which “websites you’re browsing” at any given time. And yet, she says, “There’s a lot of benefit to getting to know your colleagues on a more intimate level. There’s laughter, there’s humor, and you feel the rhythm of each other’s work and lives.” Dillon recommends trying to embrace the open office concept by focusing on the positives, “the bonding,” and downplaying the negatives, “the occasional TMI.” At the very least, resist your impulse to be the first to grumble about the noise, says Burkus. You don’t want people to see you as persnickety or difficult.
Align team expectations
Instead of griping, Burkus suggests, have a conversation with your team about how you can all work optimally in an open office. You should first speak to your manager since it’s best if this discussion is “instigated by leadership,” Burkus says. He recommends telling your boss, “I’d like to get the conversation going, but I don’t think I’m the right person to bring it up. Can you help?” As a team, your collective goal is to come up with “agreed-upon norms that you’ll all operate within,” says Burkus. For example, when one colleague is on the phone, the rest will speak only in whispers. “Ask for explicit and implicit support,” adds Dillon. She suggests “picking an ally who can be a second set of eyes for you,” so that if coworkers are being noisy when you’re on an important call, for example, this colleague could politely ask them to pipe down. “And you will do the same for that person.”
Invest in headphones
Dillon recommends purchasing a set of noise-canceling headphones for those times when you are “working on something that requires intense concentration.” You can listen to white noise or classical music or whatever it is that helps you feel and perform at your best . Headphones also “serve as a visual cue to your colleagues” that you’re not to be disturbed unless it’s absolutely necessary. “Use discretion in how often you use them,” Dillon warns. “Show that you are still part of the team.” Burkus says that he knows of teams that have a de facto “earbud code” that colleagues use to signify their level of focus. “Two earbuds in means ‘Leave me alone. I’m concentrating.’ One earbud in and one out means ‘Ask before interrupting me.’ And both earbuds out means ‘I’m interruptible.’”
Move around the office
Everyone needs a place at work where it’s possible to “think, write, and brainstorm free of distractions,” says Dillon. And even the most open of open offices tends to have discrete spaces that allow employees to remove themselves from the commotion. You should take full advantage of empty conference rooms, semi-private cubicles, and quiet alcoves, says Burkus. “Confront that mental block you have about staying in the desk you were assigned to,” he adds. That way, “when your chatty colleague starts talking about last night’s Game of Thrones , you can just take your laptop and move to a different part of the office.” A tip for those who work in large companies: “It’s often helpful to move to a different floor of your building,” says Burkus. “People aren’t as apt to know you and, therefore, you’re less likely to be distracted.”
Leave the office (temporarily)
If concentrating at your office proves difficult, Burkus recommends asking your boss for permission to work elsewhere — the local library or a nearby cafe — on occasion. Depending on what you’re working on, “pay attention to where you feel comfortable and where you are most productive,” and frame your request around that. For instance, you might say to your manager, “When I write these reports I need to be focused. Can I go across the street to work at the coffee shop to do this work?” This is a “smaller ask” than requesting to “ work from home one day a week,” and therefore it’s harder to refuse.
Ask to permanently move desks
If your problem isn’t the open office per se, but one talkative and very loud coworker, it might be time to “speak with your manager about moving desks,” says Dillon. “You shouldn’t suffer.” Don’t complain, however. Instead, talk to your boss “about how you will be more productive” in a new space. She suggests saying something like, “It will be easier for me to stay on deadline if I move to a place that is quieter.” Whatever you do, don’t let your annoyance “bubble up” so that you one day scream at your colleagues to shut up, says Dillon. An outburst like that “is very hard to repair,” she says.
Principles to Remember
Do:
Talk with your manager and your team about how you can all work optimally in an open office. Purchase a set of noise-canceling headphones for those times when you are working on something that requires intense concentration. Investigate private spaces in your office where you can think, write, and brainstorm free of distraction. Don’t:
Be difficult. Try to embrace the positive benefits of an open office plan. Go at it alone. Ask a trusted colleague to run interference for you from time to time and promise to do the same for that person. Suffer in silence. Speak to your manager about moving desks if you feel it will improve your productivity. Case Study #1: Be positive, and distance yourself from distractions when necessary
Zeba Rashid, who specializes in celebrity event management, has worked in many different kinds of office environments over the course of her career. She prefers open offices to a more corporate setting with closed doors and high cubicle walls.
“[My job] is all about connecting with others, and I find that an open setting is conducive to both idea flow and personal connection,” says Zeba. “I also find that having a running dialogue in the office gets my creativity flowing.”
While Zeba focuses on the positive aspects of her open environment, she readily admits that it is not optimal for when she needs to be “laser focused” on her work.
In her current job as vice president and director of influencer marketing at CRC, a New York City-based public relations and digital marketing agency, Zeba has learned how to deal with noise and distraction. “When I am working on high-level contracts or proposals, I often put on my headphones,” she says. The headphones provide a signal to her colleagues that she is “working on a time-sensitive deadline” that requires silence. Importantly, they “don’t intrude on anyone else’s conversations” in the office. “That is key: Open space is all about respect,” Zeba says.
Recently, while working on an important deadline, she reserved a conference room in the office to give herself some physical distance from her colleagues’ conversations. “I think the biggest issue in an open space is setting up the social protocols,” she says. “I always find that being direct and nicely excusing myself goes a long way towards goodwill.”
She simply told her team, “I’m working on finalizing a celebrity contract at the moment, and so I will be in the conference room if you need me for anything urgent.” Most people are there to work, so it isn’t hard to break away and disconnect from chatter when necessary.”
Zeba says she and her colleagues have developed close working relationships over time, “so we know how to work with each other and when we need the non-chatter” zone. “Working in an open office environment allows me be approachable and accessible for everyone,” she says.
Case Study #2: Develop ground rules and find a way to quiet your brain
Kaitlin Stewart, senior account executive at the TASC Group, the public relations agency, works in an open office with eight of her colleagues. Her boss, the cofounder, has a semi-private office, and there’s also a half-enclosed conference room for smaller meetings.
For the most part, Kaitlin views the open office as beneficial for her team’s camaraderie. “It allows for a lot of collaboration,” she says. “We’re all able to throw around ideas, and it creates a collegial environment.”
But noise sometimes becomes an issue. Unwanted sound can be distracting and even “debilitating for a lot of people,” she says.
That is why the team has set ground rules for how to work optimally in the open office environment. For example, “There’s no yelling across the room. If you’re engaged in friendly topical banter with a colleague, you must be mindful [to keep it down] if someone else is on the phone. If your discussion is going to be long, you need to move to the conference room,” she says.
The ground rules are “a regular point of conversation,” she says. “We frame it around strengthening the team overall and codifying our best practices.”
Kaitlin has also found meditation helps. “My boss encourages all of us to each take 20 minutes at some point during our workday to close our eyes and sit in silence,” she says. “It’s an exercise in training your brain to tune out background noise. I find it very helpful for quieting my mind.”
For now, Kaitlin has made peace with noise and distraction. But she says she “absolutely would ask to move desks” if she thought it would help her work better. “I feel strongly that your job is your livelihood, and you have to be given the tools you need to be productive and succeed.”

Read More…

BUSTED: Meet 7 sanctimonious right-wing Christians who hilariously got their just deserts

Former Virginia Governor Robert McDonnell is surrounded by members of the media after his sentencing hearing in Richmond, Virginia January 6, 2015. REUTERS/Jay Westcott Don’t miss stories. Follow Raw Story! Follow @rawstory
The arc of justice is long, and sometimes it has a wickedly ironic sense of humor. In the case of these seven religious, right-wing pastors, preachers, lawmakers, and lobbyists, the more sanctimonious they are about everybody else’s marriage and sex habits, the more likely they are to wind up disgraced over their own.
1. Jonathan Saenz SPONSORED
Jonathan Saenz is best known as the leader of Texas Values, an anti-LGBT advocacy organization in the Lone Star State. In 2011 Saenz was conscripted to head the group when it split from its parent organization, where Saenz was a lobbyist. He quickly mounted campaigns opposing gay marriage and anti-discrimination ordinances and spread invective about gays and lesbians wanting to send Christians to internment camps.
But it appears his rampant homophobia springs less from pious ideology than from petty personal grievance. In fact, his homophobia seemed to have been contracted right around the time his wife sued him for divorce while dating another woman.
Saenz didn’t take news of his wife’s new girlfriend well. He moved to ban her from being around the couple’s children, and attempted to force his wife to undergo expensive psychiatric evaluation—a process he tried to get out of paying for. Saenz countersuit, alleging his wife’s fault in the divorce for adultery, went nowhere. Now he’s stuck exacting his revenge by trying to keep others from marrying.
2. Bob McDonnell
A few years ago, then-Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell and his version of “family values” conservatism seemed destined for the GOP presidential nomination.
What a difference one corruption trial makes. The McDonnells exited the Virginia Governor’s Mansion accused of having used it for their own enrichment and that of their cronies.
During the recent trial the McDonnells’ marriage was revealed to be a sham. The defense—as in, the McDonnells!—argued that the union had dissolved during McDonnell’s tenure, to the point that Maureen McDonnell had an unrequited crush on the businessman with whom McDonnell was supposedly exchanging favors for lavish gifts.
It gets worse for the formerly smug governor. With his marriage on the rocks, McDonnell has been living with Wayne Ball, a Catholic priest. The impossibly-named Father Ball was caught in 2010 having sex with a man in a parking lot , a charge to which he eventually pled guilty. This is McDonnell’s new roomie.
Meanwhile, McDonnell’s version of conservatism suffered a statewide defeat at the polls last fall, with uber-Christian conservative Ken Cuccinelli, once a shoo-in to succeed McDonnell, going down to Terry McAuliffe. McDonnell’s spot in Father Ball’s pad is now all that remains of his once-ascendant family values empire.
3. Vance McAllister
McDonnell’s not the only religious right conservative politician who’s in free fall. Representative Vance McAllister, a strident Christian lawmaker from Louisiana, set the land-speed record for earning the label “disgraced” when security footage revealed him locking lips with a staffer who’s not his wife .
McAllister can’t make up his mind as to whether his complete and abject hypocrisy means he should give up his congressional seat. In the meantime, he’s sought counsel from another controversial proselytizer: Duck Dynasty’ s Willie Robertson. McAllister wanted nothing more than to be seen with Robertson back when the reality TV star was the right’s cause célèbre, even getting into a tussle with Senator Jim Inhofe over who got to take Robertson to the State of the Union.
But since then Duck Dynasty’ s ratings have tanked . And it doesn’t appear that McAllister’s star-struck desire to be seen with Robertson is requited: when asked about the lawmaker’s dalliance, Robertson had “ no comment at this time .” For a further twist of the knife, one of the Duck Dynasty’ s kin is challenging McAllister for his seat . You’d think a ticket to the State of the Union would buy a little more backup than that.
4. Eddie Long
Jonathan Saenz’s religious right fervor was metastasized by his divorce, but usually it happens the other way around, as epitomized by Atlanta-area preacher Eddie Long.
Long’s led the New Birth Missionary Baptist Church since 1987. He has been named by the Southern Poverty Law Center as “one of the most virulently homophobic black leaders in the religiously based anti-gay movement,” at one point sneering that “if you are gay you deserve death .” To cap it off, in 2004 Long and Martin Luther King, Jr.’s daughter led a March through Atlanta against same-sex marriage, calling for a constitutional amendment to federally prohibit the practice.
His sanctimonious stance on marriage and homosexuality would come back to haunt him. In 2010 Long was accused of seducing four male members of New Birth’s youth missionary, allegedly courting them when they were as young as sixteen. The case was settled quietly, for a rumored $2.5 million.
The kicker: Long kept his congregation, leaving the true casualty his marriage: Long’s wife filed for divorce following the allegations. Like Saenz, Long continues the pretense that he can tell others how marriage is supposed to work even as his rank hypocrisy sacrificed his own.
5. Roy Ashburn
California State Senator Roy Ashburn left a long trail of anti-LGBT votes behind him in the state house, opposing everything from the establishment of Harvey Milk Day to same-sex marriage. In fact, the Republican lawmaker was perfectly anti-LGBT, earning a round zero rating from Equality California for “for voting against every gay measure that has come before him in office.”
And he might still be casting those votes had he taken a cab home one fateful night in 2010. Ashburn was pulled over in Sacramento and booked for a DUI, normally not a career killer in politics—until it was revealed that he was stopped on the way home from a gay night club with another man in the passenger seat. He probably didn’t use his zero rating from Equality California as a pickup line.
It seemed the legislator doth protested too much. Ashburn came out as gay in a radio interview a short time later, claiming that his unbroken string of anti-LGBT votes were merely fulfilling the will of his constituents.
6. Mark Driscoll
When Mark Driscoll last graced these pages, he was warning his parishioners at the Mars Hill Church in Seattle, WA that masturbation was an expression of homosexuality and could imperil a marriage by turning a husband into a “notorious minute-man.” How can men avoid this debilitating practice, according to Driscoll? By staying off the internet (by which he meant particular lurid corners of it) lest they “end up an oddity of the world-wide web.”
Now Driscoll himself is the oddity. Driscoll’s infamy, masturbation-based and otherwise, has ballooned in the past couple years. He has battled plagiarism charges . And copped to using a PR firm to buy enough copies of his book to place him on the New York Times bestseller list (for exactly one week). His church is experiencing layoffs. And Ex-Mars Hill Church members have written about bizarre “ demon trials ” Driscoll performed on those who complained of depression.
How can he save face from this slew of bad press? Apparently by keeping his members from reading anything about it. “Love Jesus,” Driscoll said in a recent sermon , “read your Bible, stay off the Internet. It’s all shenanigans anyways.”
Shenanigans, articles about Driscoll’s evaporating empire; either way. Once Driscoll was warning about certain sites on the web for fear that it could pollute their lives; now he’s trying to keep his dwindling following from the whole thing for fear that it could take down his own.
7. Jerry Pittman
At least plagiarism charges and schemes to become a bestseller have some ambition to them. The lowest end of this list has to go to Grace Fellowship Church pastor Jerry Pittman of Jackson, Tennessee.
Pittman was already in legal trouble for accusations that he plotted a vicious and violent assault on his son and his son’s boyfriend as they tried to attend his services one day. “My uncle and two other deacons came over to the car per my dad’s request,” Jerry Pittman, Jr. said. “My uncle smashed me in the door as the other deacon knocked my boyfriend back so he couldn’t help me, punching him in his face and his chest. The other deacon came and hit me through my car window in my back.” The young man added that as they were beaten and mocked with homophobic epithets, none of the bystanders offered to help.
But it was something else entirely that finally got Pittman into court, when he was arrested for stealing copper wire from his wife . In another shining example of conservative marriage, Pittman and his wife were separated at the time, but that didn’t stop him from scavenging thousands of dollars worth of copper from her scrap yard.
It’s the ultimate symbol of the fall of these seven: so lofty about others’ behavior only to be caught in the pettiest of their own sins. Don’t let Silicon Valley control what you see. Get more stories like this in your inbox, every day. Email Address

Read More…