Mike Clark, known for WRIF’s ‘Drew & Mike’ show, dies at 63

Broadcast personality Mike Clark, the metro Detroit native who helped lead the popular “Drew and Mike Show,” has died, according to a post on his Facebook account. He was 63. He died at his home in Bloomfield Township. The cause of death was not noted in a post published Tuesday afternoon on Clark’s official account. “It is with great sadness that we announce that Mike Clark has passed away during the night. He is now flying high like he always wanted,” read the post . Clark held a pilot’s license and was a certified flying instructor. “Drew and Mike” ran from 1991 to 2013 on WRIF-FM (101.1), quickly becoming the market’s top morning radio program thanks to the duo’s edgy, locally flavored humor. Clark reunited with Drew Lane in 2016 for a daily podcast, though he appeared infrequently in recent years and was stymied by a paralyzed vocal cord. “That affected his health overall,” said longtime producer Marc Fellhauer. “But he was getting better. What we knew is that he was getting stronger.” Clark had also lost mobility because of knee issues following a motorcycle accident, said Trudi Daniels, news reader on the “Drew and Mike Show” during the WRIF days. Fellhauer and Daniels remain involved with “The Drew & Mike Podcast,” launched in 2016. Daniels said Clark would be sad to miss out on Saturday’s Michigan State-Michigan football game. “He was a big Spartans fan,” she said. “We’ll miss his anguished phone calls.” During the “Drew and Mike” run, Clark was the on-air everyman, his raspy voice, raucous laugh and man-of-the-street Michigan accent playing off Lane’s polished radio chops. Clark piloted the show on his own from 2007 to 2009 as Lane took a sabbatical and then sought a spot on afternoon radio. The duo’s potty humor and topical segments helped reap massive listenership, particularly during their first decade at WRIF. Clark and Lane reigned for years atop the local Arbitron ratings in the key 25-54 demographic beloved by advertisers. Howard Stern’s syndicated morning show was among those that struggled to make a dent against the “Drew and Mike” juggernaut in the late ’90s. “Drew and Mike had sealed off that audience by being local — and at least as suggestive as Stern could be,” said former Free Press radio writer John Smyntek, who covered Clark and Lane for nearly all of their WRIF run. Clark, a former emergency medical technician, was working with Michigan Consolidated Gas when he made his first inroads on Detroit radio, enlisted by a friend at WRIF for spots with then-morning jock Ken Calvert. Clark was never formally trained in radio — which redounded to his benefit, Fellhauer said. “He didn’t get all the bad instructions about how to broadcast,” Fellhauer said. “He was the everyman, and that’s what made it work. He started radio full-time at 37 — a pretty ballsy move.” When Lane took over the morning shift in 1991, Clark was tapped as a surly traffic reporter known as “Mr. Stress,” and quickly moved into a co-hosting role. Ratings took off. “J.P. McCarthy (at WJR-AM) was the morning voice of Detroit in the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s,” Smyntek said. “By the time the ’90s came around, people were interested in something a little more edgy.” Where Lane was the more polished half of the duo, Clark was the regular guy who connected with listeners and kept the laughs going through tough economic times for the city and the region. “He was a Detroit guy doing radio in his hometown. Mike Clark absolutely understood the mindset here and made people laugh at a time when things weren’t so good,” said Fred Jacobs, president of the Bingham Farms-based Jacobs Media consulting firm. Jacobs, who has done work for WRIF over the course of several decades, puts the Drew and Mike partnership in the same radio pantheon as past Detroit stars like McCarthy, Dick Purtan, and Martha Jean (The Queen) Steinberg. “It was the Drew and Mike era,” said Jacobs of their heyday. Clark and Lane had “magic” as on-air partners, according to Dick Kernen of the Specs Howard School of Media Arts in Southfield. “One of the things I thought was really neat about that show is there was no competition between the talent,” said Kernen, vice president for industry relations for Specs Howard. “(Clark) was who he was. He didn’t compete with his partner and (Lane) didn’t compete with him. They each had a role and they played it very successfully.” Kernen said he has been impressed by the comments on Clark’s passing on social media, where fans and broadcasting peers have been sharing memories. “Mike was always gracious to us through the years, along with Drew, and paved the way for what we do every morning. I know Heaven is a much funnier place with Mike in it,” tweeted the Mojo in the Morning team from WKQI-FM (95.5). “Sad news about a great talent. I loved listening to and being on with Mike,” wrote Fox 2 Detroit’s Rob Wolchek on Twitter. By the time their WRIF run wrapped in 2013, Lane and Clark’s ratings remained strong, but had begun skewing older. In a fast-changing media industry, “Drew and Mike” represented the last of a breed, having gotten in on local radio’s final era of mega salaries and huge ratings. “I’m an easy laugh — maybe too easy. Many tell me they like my laugh, which makes me feel good,” Clark told the Free Press in 1996. “Most importantly, unlike way too many men and women in radio, the laugh is real. Not fake. That’s why I never practice it. Believe it or not, some are so phony in their laugh, they do practice it. There is nothing worse than listening to a show with fake laughter going on. It’s a sign the people doing the laughing don’t have a clue what’s going on in the room, and that they are way too souped up emotionally to connect with the moment. I am here to tell you my laugh has all-natural ingredients.” Clark was born April 21, 1955, in Pontiac, and grew up in Royal Oak, later attending Adams High School in Rochester Hills. He studied computer science for two years at Henry Ford Community College in Dearborn. Free Press pop culture critic Julie Hinds contributed to this article.

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Woman’s Viral Drawings Totally Nail Why Moms Are So Exhausted

Image via Facebook/Mattea Goff A woman drew a comic for her husband to show how tough nighttime nursing is
Most any mom who has exclusively nursed a newborn is familiar with Mattea Goff’s struggle with nighttime nursing. But it can be hard to explain to non-nursing partners how hard it is to survive each and every night , even though they are often laying right next to you.
Goff’s solution? Get a pad of paper and draw it.
She posted her sketches on Facebook with this message: “So this past weekend I was having a hard time finding the words (probably because I haven’t had any sleep) to express to Kris why I’m not in the best of moods first thing in the morning. So I sat down with my coffee and drew him a visual.”
After posting her five-panel cartoon about the waking nightmare that can be nighttime nursing an infant, it quickly went viral, tallying over 186,000 shares and 55,000 comments (mostly from moms tagging friends and partners).
Let’s take a closer look at this genius one panel at a time. First off: the beginning of bed time. Everyone’s so happy and so unconscious. Lovely.
But then uh-oh: someone’s still not learned about importance of circadian rhythms yet. Image via Mattea Goff
Next, we have the wiggly nighttime nursing baby, while Useless Nipples sleeps on. Image via Mattea Goff
Then, we discover, night after night, that the sharpest substance on the earth is not the razor’s edge of a diamond, but the teeny tiny fingernails of an infant.
Next, the inevitable nighttime nursing spit up. Is it enough to even clean up, or could you just get away with covering it with a nursing pad? In a way, the warmth is nice. Image via Mattea Goff
In the final panel, the bearer of Useless Nipples awakens refreshed, the baby is sleeping soundly, and mom looks like she’s been hit by an adorable angel truck. Image via Mattea Goff
Goff, who has two daughters, ages five and five months, has been buoyed by everyone who’s left comments and messages for her since posting the drawings.
“The response has been amazing and almost 100% positive,” she tells Scary Mommy. “It’s fantastic how much support and encouragement has surrounded this thing. I never, ever expected it to get this much love.”
Goff said that she’s always loved art, and that she’s been drawing cartoons since she was a teenager, though she’s never done so professionally or publicly — just projects for friends and family. Now, she wants to create a Facebook and Instagram page to share her art — and her feelings about motherhood, in all of their complexity.
“In true mom fashion, I’ve got lots of balls in the air,” she said. “Wouldn’t you know it that something this amazing would come at the busiest time.”
Her husband has been fully supportive, both of the message of her art, and her ideas for sharing it in the future. Advertisement
“One thing that’s really resonated with me,” she said, “I’ve received messages from moms all over the world at this point and I think it’s amazing how everyone’s culture and situation can be completely different but certain truths just penetrate all of that and in the end we’re all just moms trying to do the best we can for our families. It’s beautiful.” Image via Mattea Goff
“If I had one message I hope to send, it’s that our supportive dads are irreplaceable and a wonderful thing,” she said. “If anything, this will encourage more dads to be that supportive pillar that we need. Even when we have the most supportive and involved husbands and partners it doesn’t mean that being a mom isn’t difficult, that we don’t get tired and cranky. But for me if I didn’t laugh I would cry so (most of the time) I choose to bring humor to these serious issues.”

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Piers Morgan Disgusted With ‘Emasculated’ 007 Daniel Craig Carrying Baby Daughter

ENTERTAINMENT 10/15/2018 10:53 pm ET Piers Morgan Disgusted With ‘Emasculated’ 007 Daniel Craig Carrying Baby Daughter Twitter users went stork raving mad. By Mary Papenfuss British news host Piers Morgan couldn’t stand that James Bond actor Daniel Craig was spotted in New York carrying his weeks-old daughter with wife Rachel Weisz in an “emasculating” front pack.
Oh 007.. not you as well?!!! #papoose #emasculatedBond pic.twitter.com/cqWiCRCFt3
— Piers Morgan (@piersmorgan) October 15, 2018 Twitter users wailed.
One tweet urged Morgan to return, for the good of society, back to “1888 where your thoughts on masculinity were formed .”
Morgan tried to explain in a later tweet that 007 should carry his baby in his arms, not in a wussy “papoose.” But anyone who has ever carried a baby during a stroll knows that’s just not practical.
He’s not carrying it, that’s my point. He’s using an emasculating papoose.
James Bond would never use a papoose to carry his babies. https://t.co/6aZZSFUEjy
— Piers Morgan (@piersmorgan) October 15, 2018 So someone came up with a more macho alternative for Morgan.
Here is a more manly version of a #papoose for you @piersmorgan pic.twitter.com/pHAMGP7KjZ
— True Blue (@True___Blue) October 16, 2018 Others straight-out skewered Morgan, while lots of dads posted sweet photos of themselves proudly carrying their own babies.
Proud to wear my kid all day every day. If you’re not secure enough in your masculinity to wear your kid, well… there’s something wrong with your idea of what it is to be a man.
— Ron Robinson Jr (@ronrobinsonjr) October 15, 2018 Fragile masculinity much?
— L danielle (@LaurieDanielle4) October 15, 2018 I’m pretty sure Daniel Craig could kick the crap out of Piers Morgan, even while still carrying his child in the papoose. #GoodDad #Bond #JamesBond #papoose #NotEmasculated https://t.co/D13KKcHvAI
— Kurt Dietrich (@khdietrich) October 15, 2018 Emasculated? I don’t think I’ll ever feel more of a man than when I’m looking after my children. Dick.
— Dean Smith (@deansmith7) October 15, 2018 All the Bonds do it. pic.twitter.com/4cO2TGBFoB
— Josh Rosenau 🔥 (@JoshRosenau) October 15, 2018 Ahaha, Piers, you flaccid old dick. I’ve seldom been happier in my life than when walking around with my babies strapped to me. What a loss for you that you’re too much of a man to be a dad. pic.twitter.com/PE6V5OrXBn
— Nathan Fairbairn (@nathanfairbairn) October 15, 2018 fixed it for you, Piers: pic.twitter.com/cxSbWVmrpa
— Born Miserable (@bornmiserable) October 15, 2018 Daniel Craig is an actor Piers, he isnt “REALLY” James Bond. Also real men carry their own baby. It means we are secure with our own masculinity.
— Chicago Mike 2.0 🍩 (@ChicagoMGD_SD) October 15, 2018 I once taught a college class while wearing my napping baby girl. pic.twitter.com/goDYSk4Mzc
— Wes Dunn (@WesDunn) October 15, 2018 Looks like a hot dad
— Amy Hernandez (@utfeen) October 15, 2018 I see a loving father.
— Amy Somensky (@PadmeSkywalker1) October 15, 2018 In my experience, women find a man who cares for children to be both masculine and appealing.
Unlike when @piersmorgan goes for a walk in public, and the sound of vaginas slamming shut is deafening.
— James Fell (@BodyForWife) October 15, 2018 Heres me with my son. Couldn’t be happier to be associated with the likes of James Bond. #DanielCraig #JamesBond pic.twitter.com/u8VKp2sNYD
— brad reichel (@BrReichel) October 15, 2018 Alrighty then… I’ll never understand the British sense of humor… Hope you’re well!
— Montel Williams (@Montel_Williams) October 15, 2018 did you hit your head or something
— spooky hellentine (@LucyXIV) October 15, 2018 Bugger off, Piers, you Gooner Neanderthal. How do you say “asshole” in the Queen’s English?
— Carter Gaddis (@DadScribe) October 16, 2018 pic.twitter.com/d7IyZYc7Kw
— LMG (@lmg1700) October 16, 2018 Mary Papenfuss Trends Reporter,

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