Roseanne Barr Reacts to ‘The Conners’: ‘I AIN’T DEAD, BITCHES!!!!’

Menu Politics Entertainment Media Economy World London / Europe Border / Cartel Chronicles Israel / Middle East Africa Asia Latin America Sports Tech Social Justice STORE Politics Entertainment Media Economy World London / Europe Border / Cartel Chronicles Israel / Middle East Africa Asia Latin America Sports Tech Social Justice Wires Podcasts Delingpole Bullets with AWR Did She Say That? Curt Schilling Show People STORE Politics Entertainment Media Economy World London / Europe Border / Cartel Chronicles Israel / Middle East Africa Asia Latin America Sports Tech Social Justice Wires Podcasts Delingpole Bullets with AWR Did She Say That? Curt Schilling Show People STORE TRENDING: Beto vs. Cruz Old Biden Winning! Roseanne Horseface Lindsey Graham Fauxcahontas Saudi Arabia Roseanne Barr Reacts to ‘The Conners’: ‘I AIN’T DEAD, BITCHES!!!!’ Craig Ruttle / Associated Press 16 Oct 2018 Roseanne Barr reacted Tuesday night to the launch of The Conners , ABC’s attempt to reboot her smash hit series after she was fired from the show earlier his year for a controversial tweet about former Obama aide Valerie Jarrett.
The new series killed off its main character in the first episode due to an opioid overdose — an attempt, perhaps, to relate to the struggles of working-class Americans, without the actor to whom those Americans had once related.
Roseanne reacted on Twitter, in all caps: “I AIN’T DEAD, BITCHES!!!!”
I AIN’T DEAD, BITCHES!!!!
— Roseanne Barr (@therealroseanne) October 17, 2018
Literally minutes before, Barr and Rabbi Shmuley Boteach — a Breitbart News contributor — issued a press statement with more diplomatic language:
While we wish the very best for the cast and production crew of The Conners, all of whom are deeply dedicated to their craft and were Roseanne’s cherished colleagues, we regret that ABC chose to cancel Roseanne by killing off the Roseanne Conner character. That it was done through an opioid overdose lent an unnecessary grim and morbid dimension to an otherwise happy family show.
“This was a choice the network did not have to make. Roseanne was the only show on television that directly addressed the deep divisions threatening the very fabric of our society. Specifically, the show promoted the message that love and respect for one another’s personhood should transcend differences in background and ideological discord. The show brought together characters of different political persuasions and ethnic backgrounds in one, unified family, a rarity in modern American entertainment. Above all else, the show celebrated a strong, matriarchal woman in a leading role, something we need more of in our country.
“Through humor and a universally relatable main character, the show represented a weekly teaching moment for our nation. Yet it is often following an inexcusable — but not unforgivable — mistake that we can discover the most important lesson of all: Forgiveness. After repeated and heartfelt apologies, the network was unwilling to look past a regrettable mistake, thereby denying the twin American values of both repentance and forgiveness. In a hyper-partisan climate, people will sometimes make the mistake of speaking with words that do not truly reflect who they are. However, it is the power of forgiveness that defines our humanity.
“Our society needs to heal on many levels. What better way for healing than a shared moment, once a week, where we could have all enjoyed a compelling storyline featuring a witty character – a woman – who America connected with, not in spite of her flaws, but because of them. The cancellation of Roseanne is an opportunity squandered due in equal parts to fear, hubris, and a refusal to forgive.”
The controversy appeared to have caused problems at YouTube, as fans clicked on a link Roseanne had tweeted the day before, encouraging them to subscribe to her YouTube channel. Both her channel and the main site were down as of 10:00 p.m. EDT Tuesday afternoon. ( Update: YouTube restored service later Tuesday evening, without explanation. SiliconValley.com indicated that the reason for the outage remained unclear.)
Main YouTube site
Roseanne channel
Critics’ opinions on The Conners were mixed. The Associated Press called it a “triumph”; others disagreed.
It was depressing and sad and did not make me want to watch again. A well-produced and -acted total drag. https://t.co/1EUM14audL
— Instapundit.com (@instapundit) October 17, 2018
Joel B. Pollak is Senior Editor-at-Large at Breitbart News. He is a winner of the 2018 Robert Novak Journalism Alumni Fellowship. He is also the co-author of How Trump Won: The Inside Story of a Revolution , which is available from Regnery. Follow him on Twitter at @joelpollak .
Entertainment Politics ABC Hollywood Roseanne Barr shmuley boteach The Conners Valerie Jarrett

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12 great fall books to read now, according to authors

Beach read season may be behind us, but fireside read season is fast approaching! We’re planning to curl up with plenty of good books this fall thanks to the help of a few people who know a thing or two about a good read.
Fall books: Ultimate romance reads, nonfiction and more Oct. 16, 2018 06:37 Author Ann Patchett (whose latest book, ” Nashville: Scenes from the New American South, ” comes out in November), Sarah J. Maas (whose final book in the ” Throne of Glass ” series, ” Kingdom of Ash ,” hits shelves next week), and Buzzfeed Books Editor Isaac Fitzgerald, stopped by with their picks for great books to binge this season.
Whether you’re looking for a fictional escape or a true tale that inspires, this list is filled with books to make you want to curl up and read for hours.
Fiction “Baby, You’re Gonna Be Mine,” by Kevin Wilson, $12, Amazon
TODAY editors, writers and experts take care to recommend items we really like and hope you’ll enjoy! Just so you know, TODAY does have affiliate relationships. So, while every product is independently selected, if you buy something through our links, we may get a small share of the revenue.
“Baby, You’re Gonna Be Mine,” by Kevin Wilson $12 Amazon Also available at Walmart and Barnes & Noble .
“This collection of short stories is nothing short of a masterpiece,” said Patchett. “There are no weak sisters, and even though themes of children and parents repeat, every story here is memorable and distinct. Rough, raw and utterly human, it is completely original and should be heaped with awards.”
“The Kiss Quotient,” by Helen Hoang, $10, Amazon
“The Kiss Quotient,” by Helen Hoang $10 Amazon Also available at Barnes & Noble and Walmart .
“It’s a sweet, sexy and fun book about a woman with Asperger’s who hires a male escort to teach her the ins and outs of dating, and I just adored every page. I really can’t wait to see what Helen Hoang writes next,” said Maas.
“The Golden State,” by Lydia Kiesling, $17, Amazon
“The Golden State,” by Lydia Kiesling $17 Amazon Also available at Barnes & Noble .
“Kiesling’s incisive debut novel introduces us to a woman, a family, and a country in crisis. When Daphne’s Turkish husband has his green card revoked and is no longer allowed to enter the United States, Daphne is left to raise their toddler on her own,” said Fitzgerald. “As the stress and pressure mount, she escapes her old life in San Francisco to hide out in a mobile home in the Northern California desert with her child. Both timely and perennial, ‘The Golden State’ examines motherhood, family, racism, and these fractured United States with intelligence, humor, and hard-earned heart.”
Nonfiction “The Husband Hunters,” by Anne De Courcy, $15, Amazon
“The Husband Hunters,” by Anne De Courcy $15 Amazon Also available at Barnes & Noble and Walmart .
“If you’re a fan of Downton Abbey, pick up this book,” said Maas. “It’s the real-life history of the American heiresses who married into the (broke) British nobility between 1874 and 1905. It’s marvelously written, and such an interesting, insightful examination of high society on both sides of the Atlantic. I couldn’t put it down.”
“Heavy: An American Memoir,” by Kiese Laymon, $14, Amazon
“Heavy: An American Memoir,” by Kiese Laymon $15 Amazon Also available at Walmart and Barnes & Noble .
“In his memoir ‘Heavy,’ Laymon stunningly lays his life bare, from growing up black and poor in Mississippi with a professor mother to his college years to the present,” said Fitzgerald. “True to its title, ‘Heavy’ is a masterful exploration of burdens of all kinds, be they the burdens of family secrets, of racism, of physical bodies, and more. Heavy is a richly layered, powerful achievement.”
“Barking at the Choir,” by Gregory Boyle, $12, Amazon
“Barking to the Choir: The Power of Radical Kinship,” by Gregory Boyle $12 Amazon Also available at Walmart .
“Father Boyle is the founder of Homeboy Industries, the world’s largest gang rehabilitation program. He creates jobs, heals the deepest wounds with love and acceptance, and brings warring factions together. If you’d like a blueprint for how to do good in the world and be a better person, read this book,” said Patchett.
Children and Young Adult “Black Wings Beating,” by Alex London, $12, Amazon
“Black Wings Beating,” by Alex London $12 Amazon Also available at Barnes & Noble and Walmart .
“In the dazzlingly imagined world of ‘Black Wings Beating,’ birds of prey are worshipped and those who can tame them enjoy respect and power,” said Fitzgerald. “With an impending war and twins on a dangerous journey thrown into the mix, ‘Black Wings Beating’ gives us irresistible, complex characters in a propulsive, adventure-filled story, pulling off the rare trick of leaving its readers satisfied but undeniably excited for a second volume.”
“But Not the Armadillo,” by Sandra Boynton, $5, Amazon
“But Not the Armadillo,” by Sandra Boynton $5 Amazon Also available at Walmart and Barnes & Noble .
“The story of an armadillo who marches to his own drum reads like a pocket collection of profound Buddhist wisdom by Thich Nhat Hanh,” said Patchett. “He is in every way a perfect and unique armadillo who asks only to be accepted for who he is. Not a bad message for a small child, and the book can be chewed on.”
“Can I Be Your Dog?” by Troy Cummings, $17, Amazon
“Can I Be Your Dog?” by Troy Cummings $17 Amazon Also available at Barnes & Noble and Walmart .
“I have a 4.5 month-old son, who we read to almost every night (even if he’s too young to really understand what we’re saying) and ‘Can I Be Your Dog?’ is one of our favorites,” said Maas. “It’s about a homeless dog who sends around letters to everyone in his neighborhood, asking if they’ll adopt him, and the first time I read this book, I bawled. I won’t spoil the ending, but it is just so sweet and heartfelt and wonderful.”
Author’s Choice “The Overstory,” by Richard Powers , $19, Amazon
“The Overstory,” by Richard Powers $19 Amazon Also available at Walmart and Barnes & Noble .
Patchett recommended “The Overstory,” saying, “The greatest novel ever written about trees. This epic weaves together nine separate stories about people and trees and slowly brings them together like a complex root system. If ever a book could save the world, it’s this one.”
“Consumed,” by J.R. Ward, $18, Amazon
“Consumed,” by J.R. Ward $18 Amazon Also available at Barnes & Noble and Walmart .
“I’m a massive fan of J.R. Ward, so as soon as I heard that she was writing a standalone novel about firefighters, I was 110 percent on board. ‘Consumed’ does not disappoint,” said Maas. “It’s got everything you’d want from a J.R. Ward novel: well-drawn characters, swoon-worthy romance, and heart-stopping action that will make you swear you’re right there in the flames. Yet another stellar novel from an absolute rock star of an author.”
“All You Can Ever Know,” by Nicole Chung, $16, Amazon
“All You Can Ever Know: A Memoir,” by Nicole Chung $16 Amazon Also available at Walmart and Barnes & Noble .
“‘All You Can Ever Know,’ Chung’s deeply moving and profound account of her life as a Korean American adoptee, as she grows up and strives to understand her identity, and, later, about to become a parent herself, decides to seek out her birth parents,” said Fitzgerald. “‘All You Can Ever Know’ honors the grand complexity of love, family, and identity, while showing us how these things can save us and break us with devastating clarity and beauty.”
Now all that’s left to do is decide which one to read first!
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It Wasn’t Cool To Care In The ‘Mid90s’ — But Jonah Hill Does

Enlarge this image In Jonah Hill’s directing debut Mid90s , Stevie (Sunny Suljic, left) and Ray (Na-kel Smith) come of age among an LA skateboarding crew. Tobin Yelland/A24 hide caption
toggle caption Tobin Yelland/A24 In Jonah Hill’s directing debut Mid90s , Stevie (Sunny Suljic, left) and Ray (Na-kel Smith) come of age among an LA skateboarding crew.
Tobin Yelland/A24 Jonah Hill grew up in the age of irony: the 1990s.
What was cool was to not care — about anything really. If you did, you were mocked endlessly. Caring didn’t just mean you weren’t cool — it meant you weren’t masculine.
But when it comes to his newest project Mid90s — the first film that he has directed — Hill cares deeply. He wanted to tell a story that mattered to him personally.
Mid90s isn’t a story about his life per se. It’s about the universal longing of a teenage kid who just wants to fit in.
It’s about a group of friends in Los Angeles in, yes, the middle of the ’90s. Skateboarding is at the center of their universe. And Hill is determined to treat the subject with respect.
Enlarge this image Jonah Hill (right) talks through a scene with Lucas Hedges (left) and Sunny Suljic. Many of the teenagers he cast were first-time actors. Tobin Yelland/A24 hide caption
toggle caption Tobin Yelland/A24 Jonah Hill (right) talks through a scene with Lucas Hedges (left) and Sunny Suljic. Many of the teenagers he cast were first-time actors.
Tobin Yelland/A24 “Skateboarding is always shown as, like, ‘Cowabunga, dude!'” he says in an interview. “And it’s offensive. And so skateboarding is really sensitive. Even when they heard, ‘Oh, the kid from Superbad ‘s going to make a skateboarding movie?’ You know, like, ‘Thumbs down.’
“Skateboarding is the most protective, insular community, which is why it’s so difficult to make a film involving it. It’s butchered, you know, it’s misunderstood. Imagine if there was like 10 movies about NPR hosts … but none of them had ever set foot in a recording booth and interviewed anybody, you know what I mean? So it’s like any really proud subculture.”
At the center of the story is a 13-year-old named Stevie. Things are bad for him at home; his brother beats him up. He’s lonely and looking for some kind of connection.
Stevie sees this group of kids hanging out in front of this skate shop and he feels instantly close to their tribe.
“It’s the kind of closeness you can see from 10,000 miles away,” Hill says. “It’s sort of a[n] idiosyncratic, perverse closeness, layered with a lot of toxic masculinity and on-the-surface cruelty, but such a deep connection and family situation.”
Interview Highlights On if Hill ever saw his own skateboarding friends as a family
Movie Interviews Finding, Then Filming, The Young All-Female Crew In ‘Skate Kitchen’ Movie Interviews In ‘Minding The Gap,’ Skateboarding Is The Least Of The Pain I did. I’ve had it many various ways, whether it was skateboarding, film — but I definitely felt like an outsider, I definitely felt like I didn’t belong. And there’s a certain person that skateboarding draws.
You know, skateboarding now is such a — it’s going to be an Olympic sport for God’s sakes; it’s so mainstream. But when I started skateboarding, it was not cool, and society really looked down on you as a nuisance. One of the things I loved about it was the non-judgmentalness, in certain ways, of skateboarders.
And I think that created a lens that I saw life through, whether it was sense of humor, musical taste, cinema taste. It really was an ethic and aesthetic for me that I carry with me to this day.
On the way the teenage boys talk in the movie, which is often offensive
Hill: It’s been such a magical experience showing this film, because it is my heart; it is my heart and my soul. And the .01 percent where someone views the toxic masculinity or the homophobia as me thinking that’s funny has been heartbreaking, because it was done so intentionally to hold a mirror up to how people in this generation grew up, and the changes we’re having to make, and the wrong lessons we’ve learned. To me, they speak so aggressively about women and gay people, that it’s — that is how it was, and I thought it would be way more disrespectful to change history than to show it just as it was, and let the audience see how ugly it feels.
Martin: Our pop culture critic here at NPR, Linda Holmes, said this about the film:
It felt like a salute to how toxic masculinity makes boys feel included. Which is true! But not sweet, as Hill seems to find it.
How do you respond to that?
Hill: I just disagree. I found that it was connective tissue, which is unfortunate. I still think these people were there for each other, even though they had a lot of behavior I don’t think is cool.
The point of the movie is that nothing’s black or white. I’m not a moralist; I’m not here to tell an audience how they should feel. I think the way they speak about women and gay people is really a messed-up way to go about that. And then at the end of the film, they still are there for one another.
So I don’t think anyone is purely good or purely bad. I hope to create complex characters that constantly are challenging what you think of them.
On the casting of the movie, which employed a lot of first-time actors
Hill: The singular most moving experience in my life was casting first-time or non-actors. And they became these people, and became actors and artists.
One of the kids, Olan [Prenatt] — the kid with the long, curly hair who’s very light and fun and funny — at lunch … all the kids would joke around, talk trash and stuff. And I saw he looked really pensive and that was abnormal. And you feel kind of big-brotherly or protective over them, so I was concerned. And then I looked down, and he had his rumpled-up script under the table, and he was rehearsing his lines during lunch. And this is a kid who had never thought about acting before.
Martin: Which is so funny, right, because the guys, the characters they’re playing are struggling to be perceived like they don’t care about anything. It’s not cool to care.
Hill: In the ’90s, it was the lamest thing ever to say that you cared, or tried — at least in the culture I grew up in. And what I love about spending time with these kids now is that they are motivated. And these kids give such naturalistic performances — I am just so proud of them. It’s very moving.
On directing
You know, my whole dream my whole life was to be a writer, director. I fell into this 15-year acting career where I got to learn from a lot of my heroes, and it’s something I have wanted to do and would’ve done sooner. It’s just that you only get one chance to make your first film. And I really wanted to wait until it was something that really meant something to me. I love this film; I stand by it. And I hope to just keep making things that I care about. That would be a great life. I should be so lucky.
Danny Hajek, Taylor Haney and Jerome Socolovsky produced and edited this interview for broadcast. Patrick Jarenwattananon adapted it for the Web.

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