What Donald Trump did Thursday night in Montana is genuinely dangerous

(CNN) During a Thursday night campaign rally in Montana, Donald Trump, the President of the United States, praised a Republican Congressman for assaulting a reporter .
Don’t believe me? Here’s the relevant passage on Rep. Greg Gianforte from Trump’s speech: “But Greg is smart. And by the way, never wrestle him. You understand that? Never. Any guy that can do a body slam, he’s my kind of … He was my guy. I shouldn’t say this, because — there’s nothing to be embarrassed about. So I was in Rome with a lot of the leaders from other countries talking about all sorts of things, and I heard about it. And we endorsed Greg very early, but I had heard that he body-slammed a reporter. Read More “And he was way up. And he was way up. And I said, oh, this was like the day of the election, or just before, and I said, oh, this is terrible, he’s going to lose the election. Then I said, well, wait a minute, I know Montana pretty well. I think it might help him. And it did!” THE POINT — NOW ON YOUTUBE!
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A bit of background: Gianforte, a wealthy businessman, was the GOP nominee running to replace Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke as Montana’s congressman in a May 2017 special election. Polling suggested Gianforte had a clear lead but the race was shaken up in its final 24 hours, literally, when audio emerged of Gianforte grabbing and body-slamming a political reporter for The Guardian named Ben Jacobs. After initially suggesting Jacobs might have been to blame — despite all evidence to the contrary — Gianforte acknowledged he had acted inappropriately. He won the special election anyway. Within weeks, Gianforte had sent Jacobs a letter of apology and said he would plead “no contest” to a misdemeanor assault charge. He eventually pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to a 180-day deferred sentence, 40 hours of community service, 20 hours of anger management and a $300 fine. What we have then is this: A reporter asked a Republican candidate (and now Republican member of Congress) about health care. The candidate assaulted him. No one disputes this chain of events. Gianforte pleaded guilty. He faced a suspended sentence and fines. And this is the man, in Gianforte, who Trump praised on Thursday night with these words: “Any guy that can do a body slam, he’s my kind of … He was my guy.” Trump undoubtedly viewed this line as a success because people laughed — always his measure of whether a barb worked. But, ask yourself this: What was the humor proposition here? What were people actually laughing at? The answer is this: They were laughing at one person assaulting another. (Again, the assault is not up for debate; Gianforte pleaded guilty to doing it.) It is funny, theoretically, because the person on the wrong end of the assault is a reporter. Reporters, in Trump’s rhetoric, are loathsome, dishonest creatures — not capable of human emotions. And, feeling bad for them is the surest sign that you are a “snowflake” — one of those easily offended liberals who bow to the altar of political correctness and see everything as a potential trigger warning or outrage. What all of that spin and, frankly, garbage, misses is that what Trump is doing — along with those who laugh when he does it — is dehumanizing reporters. These aren’t people like you and I, Trump is saying. They deserve to get beat up, to get assaulted, to get roughed up a little bit. They’re so bad and so dishonest, they don’t deserve the common courtesy that you would grant to someone you meet on the street. They aren’t like us. They’re other. And, therefore, we can do whatever we want to them. Trump stood by his rally performance when asked whether he regretted his comments. “No. No. not at all,” Trump said Friday. “He’s a great guy,” Trump said of Gianforte. “That was a tremendous success last night.” All of which, on its own, is troubling. Very troubling. But, Trump’s celebration of an ASSAULT on a reporter — I just can’t emphasize this enough — is made even worse by the fact that the world is currently watching Istanbul where Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi disappeared inside the Saudi Arabian consulate more than two weeks ago. The expectation — including from Trump himself — is that Khashoggi, a critic of the Saudi government, was killed inside the consulate . The Saudi government had denied involvement and, to date, Trump has taken their word for it — noting that in his conversation with King Salman, “the King firmly denied any knowledge of it.” The point here is that even as we are dealing with an international incident revolving around the near-certain murder of a journalist by a government that didn’t like what he said and wrote about them, the President of the United States is praising a member of Congress who assaulted a journalist for asking him questions. “All Americans should recoil from the President’s praise for a violent assault on a reporter doing his Constitutionally protected job,” White House Correspondents Association president Olivier Knox said in a statement Friday. I find it very hard to believe how anyone — even if you hate journalists and love President Trump — could fail to see the danger here. If you make reporters out to be deserving of being knocked around and assaulted, how big a leap is it until someone hears that as free license to do something far worse to a reporter?

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Five Books Every Young Businesswoman Should Read

323,310 views | Dec 21, 2016, 9:00 am Five Books Every Young Businesswoman Should Read Samantha Harrington
Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own. In pursuit of stories about awesome entrepreneurs. Image from Farley Santos on Flickr.
I know, I know. You’re an entrepreneur. You don’t have any free time. I know. Trust me. I can relate. But I promise you, you want to make time to read. In every way, reading helps me be a better teammate, a better businesswoman and a better person.
So I put together a list of the five books that have been most essential to me as an entrepreneur. Most are quick reads, all are unique and fun, and all have incredible lessons to share.
A quick disclaimer for all who are going to say that I’ve put together a strange entrepreneur reading list:
In entrepreneurship, like in any school of thought, there’s a canon of respected literature. It’s all the classics. It’s Simone De Beauvoir for feminism. Adam Smith for economics. It’s a young female writer’s Didion (guilty).
In entrepreneurship, the canon is made up of books like The Lean Startup and How To Make Friends and Influence People. The businesswoman canon is Lean In. And while I do think that those are important reads, this list is not canon.
This list is made up of five books have been essential to me both as a young woman and as a business-owner. Sometimes the books that I’ve found useful or enlightening as an entrepreneur have been business-focused, other times they’ve been memoirs of successful women. I find great value in reading voices from all backgrounds and pulling the relevant lessons from their lives and applying them to mine.
So without further caveats, here are my five essential reads for my fellow young, female entrepreneurs out there:
Men Explain Things To Me
For starters, I’ll point out the obvious, Rebecca Solnit is an absolute genius. She takes issue with the term mansplaining but essentially she has written the seminal text on the subject. Through this collection of essays, Solnit inspired me to be more secure in my knowledge and more confident in my public expression of that knowledge. She also does an incredible job of tying essays on to essays on subjects of more serious matters like domestic violence. Men Explain Things To Me pointed out that when we perpetuate the silencing of women around the conference table, we’re contributing to the same systemic misogyny that puts women in physical danger.
In the title-track essay, Solnit writes of a conversation she had with a man at a party. The man was smugly telling her all about this very important book that he thought she should know about. As it turned out, it was a Rebecca Solnit book. And her friend interrupted the man to point this out four times before he finally heard her.
“Being women, we were politely out of earshot before we started laughing, and we’ve never really stopped,” she writes. “I like incidents of that sort, when forces that are usually so sneaky and hard to point out slither out of the grass.”
The Five Dysfunctions of a Team
This book by Patrick Lencioni was required reading for a workshop put on by the entrepreneurial media lab I worked at in college. Reading it completely changed the way I thought about teamwork.
It’s a quirky fable that follows the new CEO of a company (a woman!) as the company is falling into disarray due, mostly, to interpersonal conflicts. So she takes her mess of a team away from the office and walks them through the five dysfunctions of a team.
At the time I read this, I was part of a particularly dysfunctional team. Reading Lencioni’s book and talking about our team’s problems in relation to the fable was really helpful. All of the lessons from that experience became even more essential when I graduated and started my own business.
“Great teams do not hold back with one another. They are unafraid to air their dirty laundry. They admit their mistakes, their weaknesses, and their concerns without fear of reprisal,” Lencioni wrote.
Year of Yes
The queen of TV, Shonda Rhimes, is actually an introvert. One holiday, Rhimes’ sister complains that she “never says yes to anything.” This sends her on a year-long adventure in which she says yes to everything.
As an entrepreneur, risk is part of the job. So reading Rhimes take on new challenges and risks is inspiring and rewarding. She talks about her career successes and struggles as well as her family and personal life. She talks about the paradox of dreaming vs. doing and she shows you, by her own example, how to work really hard to build yourself.
“I am not lucky,” She wrote, “You know what I am? I am smart, I am talented, I take advantage of the opportunities that come my way and I work really, really hard. Don’t call me lucky. Call me a badass.”
Drawing Blood
Molly Crabapple writes about womanhood in a way that’s unlike anything I’ve ever read. Drawing Blood is her completely uncensored memoir. From her struggle to make ends meet, to how she believes in herself and her work and the world it’s an incredible story with a lot to say. And I’m pretty sure Crabapple isn’t afraid to say anything.
She covers really difficult moments and incredibly personal aspects of her life. She also writes really beautifully about the power of her female friendships. And the hesitancy among women to shout their ambitions from the rooftops.
Perhaps my favorite passage in Drawing Blood is this story of a night with her friend Kim Boekbinder:
“In May, Kim played in a Village jazz club; she was the most gold-and-silver thing on its tiny stage. Afterward, as we sat on my apartment floor drinking, we told each other about our secret dissatisfactions, which we could never tell anyone else. We both wanted to make ambitious work, work that would sear the eyes. I wanted to do murals the size of buildings. Kim wanted to play to stadiums…We lay next to each other on a stained futon and whispered, for once without shame, about wanting to be Bowie or Picasso or any of those men who had stood before the world and taken it all with entitlement, never asking if he was good enough. They lived in freedom.”
I Was Told There’d Be Cake
I read this collection of Slone Crosley essays last summer when my startup was almost a year old. I was officially a year out of college and even though I had a dream job at a company I’d created, I still had that post-grad anchorless feeling (nevermind all the startup stress). These essays eased the vortex of all that.
Crosley writes about getting jobs, losing jobs, staying in touch with friends, and finding her place and herself. It’s funny, it’s lovely, it’s really complicated. It’s Crosley’s life with no frills but plenty of humor and it’s one of those reads that is entirely relatable but also makes you a little glad you’re not her.
I think most of all this book was important to me because it finds the stories in messy, everyday life. It’s full of good lessons and laughs for any young woman looking for her place in the world.
“The search for one’s first professional job is not unlike a magical love potion: when one wants to fall in love with the next thing one sees, one generally does,” Crosley wrote.
I’m a founder of Driven Media, a roving girl-power newsroom. At 23 years old, I’m helping create the kind of media that young women want. I both create content for and… MORE Samantha Harrington is co-owner and lead writer of Driven Media, a roving girl-power newsroom.
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Elizabeth Ruby, Post reporter and shining light, dies at 29

Reporter Elizabeth Ora Ruby, 29 — for five years a shining light in the New York Post newsroom — died suddenly in her sleep Wednesday in her Bronxville home.
Ruby started at The Post as a copy clerk and typist, immediately distinguishing herself as unfailingly outgoing, good-humored and kind.
“I’ve never seen her down,” her supervisor on the city desk, Ianthe Ephraim, remembered.
“She was fearless — her first day at work she came up to me and said, ‘Hi, I’m Elizabeth and I’m on the copy desk,’ ” remembered paginator Richard “Rico” Rossiello. “We became instant friends. But she talked to absolutely everybody — and she liked absolutely everybody.”
Ruby was soon reporting and writing for the news, features and sports sections, most recently profiling the man who grooms the ice for the Rink at Rockefeller Center for a Metro Section “At Work” feature.
“She loved to write. She loved to edit,” recalled Rossiello. “She loved going out and talking to people as a journalist.”
Ruby was uncommonly generous.
Reporter Isabel Vincent remembers her once returning from a vacation with an unbidden gift: “She told me, ‘I brought you back a purple T-shirt, because you never wear that color — and you should.’”
Ruby would patiently explain computers, phones and balky copy machines to new hires, and was incapable of going out for lunch or coffee without asking multiple co-workers if she could get something for them, as well.
Undaunted by “No thanks,” she’d ask again the next day, explaining cheerfully, “One of these days, you might surprise me and say yes.”
“We’re heartbroken,” managing editor Michelle Gotthelf said. “Elizabeth was part of the fabric of the newsroom. She was bright and funny, with a quirky attitude that her co-workers loved. She had a disarming, self-effacing sense of humor and a chatty wit. We’re really going to miss her.”
An avid sailor and accomplished flutist who performed often for her church, Ruby grew up in Midland Gardens. She is a 2012 graduate of Gettysburg College, where she studied writing.
Ruby is survived by her parents, David Ruby and Sarah Gavan, and her younger sister, Caroline.
Gifts in her memory may be made to the charity of one’s choice.
Calling hours will be at the Fred H. McGrath and Son Funeral Home, Bronxville, on Tuesday, Oct. 23 between the hours of 4 and 8 p.m.
A Memorial Service will be held at the Reformed Church of Bronxville on Wednesday, Oct. 24, at 11 a.m.

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