Julia Louis-Dreyfus Slams Justice Brett Kavanaugh In Mark Twain Prize Speech

POLITICS 10/22/2018 09:55 am ET Updated 5 hours ago Julia Louis-Dreyfus Slams Brett Kavanaugh In Mark Twain Prize Speech The actress went to school with Christine Blasey Ford, who accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault. By Jenna Amatulli Julia Louis-Dreyfus, honored Sunday night with the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor, took a few moments to slam Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh in her acceptance speech.
The star of HBO’s “Veep” was lauded by the likes of Jerry Seinfeld, Stephen Colbert, Kumail Nanjani, and Tina Fey before she gave her politically charged speech at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington.
“I attended Holton-Arms, a girls school in the Washington area,” said Louis-Dreyfus of the private girls school in Bethesda, Maryland, that Kavanaugh accuser Christine Blasey Ford also attended. Ford and Louis-Dreyfus were there at the same time.
“It has been in the news lately. Back in fourth grade, as a matter of fact, I was in a very serious Holton-Arms production of ‘Serendipity.’ You know it’s funny with us Holton girls — I remember every detail of that play. I could swear to it under penalty of perjury. And yet, I don’t remember who drove me to the show or who drove me home. Or if Squee or Tobin were there. Or if Brett put it on his weird wall calendar.”
ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS via Getty Images Louis-Dreyfus was one of nearly 200 women who went to Ford’s high school and signed a letter supporting her after she came forward to accuse Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were in high school.
“We believe Dr. Blasey Ford and are grateful that she came forward to tell her story,” says the letter from alumnae of Holton-Arms. “It demands a thorough and independent investigation before the Senate can reasonably vote on Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to a lifetime seat on the nation’s highest court.”
The women also said Ford’s accusation “is all too consistent with stories we heard and lived while attending Holton. Many of us are survivors ourselves.”
The Republican-led Senate brushed aside the misconduct allegations by Ford and two other women, and voted to confirm Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. Many GOP senators said they believed Ford had been sexually assaulted, but because she couldn’t remember some details, it probably wasn’t Kavanaugh who did it. Some, joined by President Donald Trump, sympathized with Kavanaugh.
“This, by the way, is totally true and not some kind of subtle attack on our newest Supreme Court Justice ― for God’s sake the man has suffered enough,” Louis-Dreyfus cracked during her address.
The actress, also known for roles in shows like “Seinfeld” and “The New Adventures of Old Christine,” is the 21st Mark Twain Prize recipient. The award is given to those who “ had an impact on American society in ways similar to the distinguished 19th century novelist and essayist best known as Mark Twain.”
Previous recipients include Richard Pryor, Lily Tomlin, Tina Fey, Will Ferrell and Eddie Murphy.
Louis-Dreyfus also discussed her experience with breast cancer. She announced her cancer diagnosis in September and underwent treatment that included chemotherapy and surgery.
“Cancer is not at all funny but a big part of dealing with it has been finding the funny moments,” this year’s recipient of the Mark Twain prize for American humor, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, says laughter got her through a battle with breast cancer. pic.twitter.com/I2H350xWl3
— CBS This Morning (@CBSThisMorning) October 22, 2018 “Cancer isn’t at all funny but a big part of dealing with it has been finding the funny moments. The old cliche about laughter being the best medicine turns out to be true. Which is good, because that’s what the current administration is trying to replace ObamaCare with,” quipped Louis-Dreyfus.
Jenna Amatulli Trends Reporter, HuffPost Suggest a correction

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Steve’s Pizza employee makes 450-mile trip to take a pie to a man in hospice care – CNN

This pizza place doesn’t deliver. That didn’t stop an employee from driving 450 miles to bring a pie to a man in hospice care By Christina Maxouris and Saeed Ahmed, CNN Updated 9:01 AM EDT, Mon October 22, 2018
(CNN) When Julie Morgan and her husband, Rich, lived in Battle Creek, Michigan, they would stop by Steve’s Pizza for dinner every payday.
That was 25 years ago. To celebrate her birthday this year, the couple — who now live in Indianapolis — wanted to take a trip to their favorite pizza place.
Instead, they ended up in the ER, where Rich Morgan was told his cancer had worsened and that he had weeks — maybe days — to live. He was placed in hospice care.
Steve’s Pizza doesn’t deliver. But when a manager at the store heard the couple’s story, he decided to take two pies to them himself — even though they were 225 miles away. It all began with a phone call
During the course of their marriage, the Morgans moved around several times. But for them, Steve’s has always been the benchmark by which all pizzas were measured.
“I can’t possibly describe how delicious this pizza is — but several moves and all these years later, it is still the gold standard and we’ve never found a better pizza yet,” Julie Morgan wrote on Facebook.
When her dad, David Dalke, found out about their birthday plan — and how Rich’s sudden diagnosis dashed it — he called Steve’s Pizza hoping they might send a note to the couple.
“I said ‘I know you’re busy.’ I explained the situation and said, ‘If you ever make it happen, just a text message to Rich and Julie that you’re sorry they couldn’t make the trip,'” Dalke told CNN.
That’s all he was hoping for: a note.
“About five minutes later he called me and he said, ‘I want to know what kind of pizza they like,” Dalke said.
It was an unusual request, but Dalke told him anyway: Pepperoni and mushroom.
On the other end of the line was Dalton Shaffer — the 18-year-old grandson of Steve, original owner of the pizzeria. Shaffer told Dalke it was near the end of the night, and as soon as he closed the store, he’d head to the house with their two favorite pizzas.
“I said, ‘Wait a minute, did you understand that I am in Indianapolis? I’m not next door?'” Dalke said.
It’s about a three-and-a-half-hour drive between the two cities. But Shaffer said he didn’t have to think twice and got on the highway without telling anyone from his family or the store.
“It was kind of a spontaneous reaction,” Shaffer told CNN. “I’m happy I did it, and on the trip down I was happy doing it.” ‘We need more Daltons’
Dalke kept the lights on and waited until 2 a.m., when Shaffer pulled into their driveway.
Shaffer handed Dalke the two pizzas, and got ready to drive back to Michigan — another three-and-a-half-hour drive.
“I told him to come in, have something to eat, drink. I asked if he wanted me to put him up for the night,” Dalke said. “But he said ‘I’ve got to get up because I’ve got to go to work the next day.'”
Shaffer wouldn’t take any money. He just drove back home, completing a 450-mile, seven-hour journey.
His remarkable act a week ago has inspired people everywhere since Julie Morgan posted about it on Facebook.
Dalke said what the world needs is “more Daltons.”
“There’s so much goodness in people — and there are people in this world that will stretch out, and care and not think twice about it,” he said. “We’re going through grief but, by golly, there’s something good that’s happening.”
And that’s the message Shaffer hopes to spread with his act of kindness.
“I have already gotten a ton of phone calls from people saying they were inspired in the future to help other people and to be able to do things like that. To me, that right there is what I want,” he said.
“I just want people to think about the family and pray for them.”
Update 5:19 pm ET: Since publishing this story CNN learned that Rich Morgan died Saturday after a two-year battle with cancer, according to his wife, Julie Morgan. She wrote, “He fought so hard and dealt with his illness with incredible grace, courage and humor. He was a man of faith and integrity who was always driven to do the right thing. There are no words to express how deeply we loved and admired him, and how much he loved us in return. Thank you so much for the outpouring of prayers and support.”

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Novelist Who Penned ‘How To Murder Your Husband’ Essay Charged With Husband’s Murder : NPR

National Novelist Who Penned ‘How To Murder Your Husband’ Essay Charged With Husband’s Murder Facebook Twitter Flipboard Email September 12, 2018 3:45 PM ET Laurel Wamsley
Twitter Enlarge this image Nancy Crampton-Brophy has been charged with the murder of her husband, Daniel Brophy. She is the author of romantic suspense novels and, in a 2011 blog post, outlined various motives and methods of killing a husband. Portland Police Bureau hide caption
toggle caption Portland Police Bureau Nancy Crampton-Brophy has been charged with the murder of her husband, Daniel Brophy. She is the author of romantic suspense novels and, in a 2011 blog post, outlined various motives and methods of killing a husband.
Portland Police Bureau How do you get away with murder? Maybe don’t write a blog post about getting away with murder.
Last week, police in Portland arrested 68-year-old Nancy Crampton-Brophy. She is charged with the murder in the death of her 63-year-old husband, chef Daniel Brophy.
At 8:30 a.m. on June 2, police and medics arrived at the Oregon Culinary Institute, after students and instructors arriving for class found Brophy suffering from a gunshot wound. The first responders attempted to revive him but weren’t successful. In a press conference that day, police said that they were investigating the death as a homicide and that they had no immediate suspects.
Crampton-Brophy is a self-published author of romantic suspense novels , many featuring chiseled ex-Navy SEALs — books with “rugged men, strong women and a good story,” she touted on her website.
There she described her home life — part of which read like the satisfying last pages of a romance novel:
“I live in the beautiful, green, and very wet, Northwest, married to a Chef whose mantra is: life is a science project. As a result there are chickens and turkeys in my backyard, a fabulous vegetable garden which also grows tobacco for an insecticide and a hot meal on the table every night. For those of you who have longed for this, let me caution you. The old adage is true. Be careful what you wish for, when the gods are truly angry, they grant us our wishes.
“… I can’t tell you when I fell in love with my husband, but I relate the moment I decided to marry him. I was in the bath. It was a big tub. I expected him to join me and when he was delayed, I called out, ‘Are you coming?’
“His answer convinced me he was Mr. Right. ‘Yes, but I’m making hors d’oeuvres.’ Can you imagine spending the rest of your life without a man like that?”
But in 2011 , for a blog called See Jane Publish , Crampton-Brophy wrote an essay titled “How to Murder Your Husband.” (The post is no longer public.)
“As a romantic suspense writer, I spend a lot of time thinking about murder and, consequently, about police procedure,” the post read. “After all, if the murder is supposed to set me free, I certainly don’t want to spend any time in jail. And let me say clearly for the record, I don’t like jumpsuits and orange isn’t my color.”
The essay described a range of possible motives for murdering a husband, ranging from avoiding the financial hit of a divorce to infidelity by a “lying, cheating bastard,” and even the possibility that the wife is a professional contract killer.
It also weighed the pros and cons of different methods: “Guns — loud, messy, require some skill. … Knives — really personal and close up. Blood everywhere. Eww.”
She warned against committing a crime of passion: “Most of the time there is a trail that leads directly to you. Each type of murder leaves clues. A crime of passion does not look like a stranger was involved.”
The couple had been married for 27 years, according to The Oregonian , and were reportedly inseparable. Brophy was a lead instructor at the culinary institute, where he was remembered as “the resident encyclopedia of knowledge” with “offbeat sense of humor and creative approach to teaching.”
The day after her husband’s death, Crampton-Brophy posted an update to Facebook.
“I have sad news to relate. My husband and best friend, Chef Dan Brophy was killed yesterday morning. For those of you who are close to me and feel this deserved a phone call, you are right, but I’m struggling to make sense of everything right now,” she wrote. “While I appreciate all of your loving responses, I am overwhelmed. Please save phone calls for a few days until I can function.”
But a neighbor, Don McConnell, told the Oregonian of an odd interaction with the widow.
“She never showed any signs of being upset or sad,” McConnell said. “I would say she had an air of relief, like it was almost a godsend.”
He asked whether the police had been keeping her updated. “She said, ‘No, I’m a suspect,’ ” without emotion, McConnell said.
The news was a jolt to others.
“It’s a big shock. It’s a big shock,” Brophy’s mother, Karen Brophy, told The Washington Post . “But we’re not making any statements.”
“Everyone that knows her, especially those closer to her than myself are sick at heart,” Anna Brentwood, a writer who says she has known the couple for two decades told the Oregonian . “We are hoping the police are wrong and just going after the easiest target.”
At a candlelight vigil a week after his death, Daniel Brophy was remembered as being gruff on the outside, compassionate underneath. Attendees recalled a cow costume the instructor used with Velcro labels to illustrate cuts of beef.
The costume was hand-sewn by Crampton-Brophy, who spoke of her late husband. “He loved teaching, he loved mushrooms, and he loved family,” she said, according to the Portland Tribune . “Not only was life a science experiment, but sometimes it was an adventure.”
Near the end of the blog post imagining how and why to kill one’s husband, Crampton-Brophy wrote that she finds “it is easier to wish people dead than to actually kill them.”
“I don’t want to worry about blood and brains splattered on my walls. And really, I’m not good at remembering lies. But the thing I know about murder is that every one of us have it in him/her when pushed far enough.”
Crampton-Brophy was arraigned in Multnomah County Circuit Court on Thursday. The judge approved a request by prosecutors to seal the court document outlining the case against her.
She wore a blue jumpsuit.
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