White House: Trump Too Ignorant to Give Secrets to China

China is spying on Trump’s cell phone calls. Fortunately, you can’t steal from an empty vault. Photo: Vasily Maximov/AFP/Getty Images Donald Trump was elected president primarily on the issue of executive branch information security. Because his opponent really did flout official email protocol as secretary of State, this was one of the few issues available to him that could gain any traction in the mainstream media. The absurdity was the scale of the attention in proportion to the gravity of the offense. Mainstream media covered the email story like Watergate. Conservatives claimed it was disqualifying. Paul Ryan loudly tried to deny Clinton access to classified information before the election. The emails became the basis for the “Lock her up!” chant that Trump partisans continue to perform. Just the other week, a generally anti-Trump conservative writer named David French insisted that Clinton’s lax handling of email plausibly merited prison:
If I’d done what Hillary did when I was in the military, I would have been jailed. At best, I’d have had to negotiate a dishonorable discharge to escape prison.
— David French (@DavidAFrench) October 11, 2018 The New York Times report that Trump is disregarding protocol and making frequent calls on cell phones, which have been intercepted by foreign hackers, should obviously dismay the information security fanatics that rallied to his cause.
The Times ’ story is filled with the kind of mordant, understated humor that tends to characterize the White House beat in an era when the president’s abnormalities are piled one atop another. Trump “typically relies on his mobile phones when he does not want a call going through the White House switchboard and logged for senior aides to see, his aides said,” the Times reports. “Many of those Mr. Trump speaks with most often on one of his cellphones, such as hosts at Fox News, share the president’s political views, or simply enable his sense of grievance about any number of subjects.”
To unpack this a bit: When he is not binge-watching Fox News, a large part of Trump’s discretionary time is spent calling up Fox News personalities to get thoughts they didn’t express on the air. Trump’s staff tries to discourage this habit, in part because many of the Fox News personalities are insane, and their insanity creates problems when Trump uses it to override his staff’s advice or demand a course of action premised upon delusional interpretations of reality. So the reason Trump is exposing his conversations to foreign hackers is that he is sneaking around his own aides (who he could just fire, and replace with aides who would let him talk to Fox News lunatics however much he wants, but for some reason has failed to do so.)
The good news, as it were, is that aides think — or at least hope — that Trump is not giving away much of value with these calls, because he doesn’t know much of value. Administration officials “said they had further confidence he was not spilling secrets because he rarely digs into the details of the intelligence he is shown and is not well versed in the operational specifics of military or covert activities.” Also, Trump is apparently too compromised by Russia to be worth spying on by Moscow: “Russia is not believed to be running as sophisticated an influence effort as China because of Mr. Trump’s apparent affinity for President Vladimir V. Putin, a former official said.”
Given that he is being secretly surveilled by China, it’s probably good that Trump is too ignorant and lazy to have anything of value to disclose. But the overall situation is quite suboptimal.
There is so much gross misconduct in this administration, it’s not clear Democrats will even bother holding hearings on this issue if they gain control of Congress. That is itself telling: Trump has clearly exceeded his opponent’s culpability on her worst scandal, and it’s probably not even one of the 100 worst things he’s done, so far.
Tags: top story the national interest politics donald trump hillary clinton but her emails lock her up More + White House: Trump Too Ignorant to Give Secrets to China Most Viewed Stories We’re Headed for a Brexit Crashout Sanders Makes a Strong Case Against the Saudis (and for Bernie 2020) The Problem Isn’t Incivility. It’s Trump’s Belief the Media Can’t Criticize Him. Gillibrand Rules Out 2020 Presidential Run These Prominent Conservatives Think the Bomb Scares Are a Liberal Hoax Most Viewed Stories We’re Headed for a Brexit Crashout Sanders Makes a Strong Case Against the Saudis (and for Bernie 2020) The Problem Isn’t Incivility. It’s Trump’s Belief the Media Can’t Criticize Him. Gillibrand Rules Out 2020 Presidential Run These Prominent Conservatives Think the Bomb Scares Are a Liberal Hoax Promoted links by Taboola THE FEED 1:42 a.m.
Voters in Kansas are getting weird texts from Trump
Kansas election officials are reviewing text messages claiming to be from President Donald Trump and telling residents that their early votes hadn’t been recorded, as Democratic leaders were quick Thursday to worry that they were part of efforts to “steal” a close governor’s race. …
One text says “Your absentee ballot is ready. Remember to vote for Pres. Trump’s allies.” A follow-up text says, “This is President Trump. Your early vote has NOT been RECORDED on Kansas’s roster.” It urges the voter to confirm his or her polling place.
Texts to voters purportedly from Trump roil Kansas election — AP 1:11 a.m. politics
politics Focus Moves to Florida in Explosive Device Investigation By Adam K. Raymond Several packages are believed to have passed through South Florida’s largest mail processing facility. 10/25/2018 Huge haul for Heitkamp
Holy crap: After her ‘no’ vote on Kavanaugn’s nomination, Heidi Heitkamp raised $12.4 MILLION in the first 17 days of October.
Of that, $7.5 million was in small donations, per new FEC filing. https://t.co/sOEuQWS8er — @Robillard 10/25/2018 Trump has a plan to ban all asylum requests at U.S.-Mexico border
President Trump is considering taking executive action to bar migrants, including asylum seekers, from entering the country at the southern border, according to people familiar with the plan. The effort would be the starkest indication yet of Mr. Trump’s election-season push to play to his anti-immigrant base as his party fights to keep control of Congress. …
The plan appeared meant as much to generate headlines to appeal to his anti-immigrant base and fuel outrage among Democrats and immigrant advocates — including legal challenges that administration officials are fully anticipating — as it was to have a practical effect on immigration. The caravan is more than 1,000 miles south of the border, and it is unclear when or whether the migrants will arrive, and how many will seek to cross into the United States.
Trump Considers Closing Southern Border to Migrants — The New York Times 10/25/2018 Snap can’t snap out of it
Snap (SNAP) posted its second consecutive quarter of declines in daily active users, highlighting the company’s continued struggles to stem user outflow to competitors including Instagram.
Daily active users came in at 186 million for the third quarter versus consensus estimates of 186.8 million, a 1% decrease from the second quarter. The company expects that daily active users will decline again in the fourth quarter.
Snap reports user decline for second consecutive quarter — Yahoo Finance 10/25/2018 Not so reassuring
We do not have any intention right now to shoot at people, but they will be apprehended, however.
— DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen says Booder Patrol has no plans, at the moment, to fire on migrants illegally crossing the border 10/25/2018 So that’s why Trump was so committed to Kavanaugh
! Newt Gingrich said that if Democrats re-take control of the House and subpoena Trump’s tax returns, it would likely force a fight in the Supreme Court. “And,” Gingrich said, “we’ll see whether or not the Kavanaugh fight was worth it.” (via WaPo) pic.twitter.com/SSCGR2GZuE — @kylegriffin1 10/25/2018 Perspectives from all sides of the debate on guns
To tell this uniquely American story, TIME partnered with JR, the artist and photographer known in part for his murals around the world that portray communities in all their complexity. In three U.S. cities profoundly affected by guns—Dallas, St. Louis and Washington, D.C.—we invited people to share their views and describe their experiences in a search for common ground.
In all, JR filmed and photographed 245 people—hunters and activists, teachers and police officers, parents and children—to create this mural for TIME’s November 5, 2018, cover.
Guns in America — Time Not everyone has an equal voice in the debate
2/16/2018 Why Rural America Controls the Debates Over Guns and Immigration By Ed Kilgore 10/25/2018 Race is coming to the foreground in the run-up to midterms
From New York to Florida, dog-whistle politics are showing up in ads and attacks from outside groups and, in some cases, GOP candidates. It’s playing out against the backdrop of President Donald Trump, who has tapped into racial anxiety with warnings of rampant violence in urban areas, voter fraud, a caravan of migrants and unknown “Middle Easterners” threatening the U.S. southern border.
Race dominates debate in final stretch of campaigns — AP The latest iteration of the dog-whistle strategy
10/25/2018 Trump’s Cynical Caravan Gambit By Zak Cheney-Rice 10/25/2018 2020 election
2020 election Gillibrand Rules Out 2020 Presidential Run By Ed Kilgore Just like Obama in 2006, Gillibrand pledged to serve her full term as senator. 10/25/2018 Reporter asks Congressman who assaulted him to stop lying about incident
U.S. Rep. Greg Gianforte has intentionally misled voters and the media about his attack on a reporter last year as the Montana Republican campaigns for re-election, the reporter’s attorney said in a letter Thursday.
Ben Jacobs’ attorney, Geoffrey Genth, sent a cease-and-desist letter threatening to cancel Jacob’s agreement not to sue Gianforte if the congressman doesn’t stop. Genth told William Mercer, Gianforte’s attorney, to preserve all documents about the attack in case they are needed as evidence.
Lawmaker Is Warned to Stop Lying About Assaulting Reporter Last Year — Bloomberg 10/25/2018 the techoning
the techoning By Madison Malone Kircher Google 10/25/2018 immigration
immigration Trump’s Cynical Caravan Gambit By Zak Cheney-Rice Trump treats the Central American migrant caravan like a military threat because he wants a war-panicked electorate. 10/25/2018 Gillibrand says she won’t run for president
Kirsten Gillibrand says the White House is not on her immediate horizon.
The junior New York senator vowed Thursday that she will not mount a challenge against President Trump in the next general election if she wins her midterm race next month.
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand pledges to not run for president if she wins midterm: ‘I will serve my six-year term’ — New York Daily News 10/25/2018 2020 election
2020 election It’s Time for Michael Avenatti to Go Away By Ed Kilgore Yeah, he’s made his point, Democrats need to toughen up. But they aren’t and shouldn’t be clueless enough to nominate him for president. 10/25/2018 The Netflix Way sounds kind of exhausting
The Netflix way emphasizes “freedom and responsibility,” trusting employees to use discretion—whether it is about taking vacation, flying business class or expensing an Uber ride home. Virtually every employee can access sensitive information, from how many subscribers sign up in each country to viewership of shows to contractual terms for Netflix’s production deals. Executives at the director level and above—some 500 people—can see the salaries of every employee.
Employees are encouraged to give one another blunt feedback. Managers are all told to apply a “keeper test” to their staff—asking themselves whether they would fight to keep a given employee—a mantra for firing people who don’t fit the culture and ensuring only the strongest survive.
At Netflix, Radical Transparency and Blunt Firings Unsettle the Ranks — The Wall Street Journal 10/25/2018
How Should Democrats React to the Mail Bombings?
Benjamin Hart 3:37 PM I guess I’m wondering to what extent democratic leaders, or people who are looking at this from a rational perspective, should be calling out right-wing rhetoric, and to what extent this message of “we all need to calm down” is acceptable. for instance, joe biden said on twitter: “This country has to come together. This division, this hatred, this ugliness has to end.”
Lisa Ryan 3:38 PM I would personally love to calm down – imagine being calm! – but i do think this comes down from the top
Ezekiel Kweku 3:38 PM it depends on if saying “we all need to calm down” is actually going to get the people responsible to calm down
Benjamin Hart 3:39 PM we know it’s not going to get them to calm down
Ezekiel Kweku 3:39 PM so then it doesn’t really matter – saying “republicans need to calm down” is also not going to work
Benjamin Hart 3:39 PM it’s not just trump, of course. a large portion of the right-wing media sphere immediately went into conspiracy theory-land on this.
the problem is that calling out right-wing rhetoric as the main problem here immediately feeds into the narrative that both sides are only interested in blaming the other
it’s a real gordian knot
Ezekiel Kweku 3:40 PM there is no really good solution here
even from a realpolitik perspective whereby you’d like to maximize your midterm chances, I’m not entirely sure what the right answer is
probably the partisan, fire-up-the-base reaction is the superior one in that case
Benjamin Hart 3:42 PM right
Lisa Ryan 3:42 PM I can’t really imagine things getting any better anytime soon
Benjamin Hart 3:42 PM well jeez, let’s not make this too optimistic
hey, global poverty rates are down!
just trying to inject some good news here
read more 10/25/2018 Milo: Still a charmer
On Thursday afternoon, Yiannopoulos posted a picture of himself with a caption that regretted that the bombs didn’t actually detonate. Yiannopoulos also told his 386,000 followers that he was upset that no mail bomb was sent to this publication, The Daily Beast.
“Just catching up with news of all these pipe bombs,” Yiannopoulos wrote. “Disgusting and sad (that they didn’t go off, and the daily beast didn’t get one).”
Instagram Refuses to Pull Down Milo Post Praising Mail Bombs — The Daily Beast 10/25/2018 The president may not have the firmest grasp of immigration law
To those in the Caravan, turnaround, we are not letting people into the United States illegally. Go back to your Country and if you want, apply for citizenship like millions of others are doing! — @realDonaldTrump 10/25/2018 A possible lead in the pipe-bombing case
The investigation into 10 pipe bombs sent to high-profile Democrats and critics of U.S. President Donald Trump is focusing on leads in Florida, a federal law enforcement source said on Thursday.
All the suspicious packages were believed to have gone through the U.S. Postal System at some point, the source said. Many of the packages had the return address of the Florida office of U.S. Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz, who formerly chaired the Democratic National Committee, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
Hunt for sender of bombs mailed to Trump critics focuses on Florida — Reuters 10/25/2018 Trump tries to win over health care voters with drug-pricing plan
The administration says the approach will also eliminate incentives for doctors to prescribe more expensive drugs, since they would no longer be reimbursed for a percentage of a drug’s cost but instead be paid a flat fee. It could also lower some of seniors’ out-of-pocket costs, which are based on the total price paid by Medicare for a given drug.
The announcement came hours after the Trump administration released a report Thursday morning highlighting the steep spending by the U.S. government on prescription drugs. It also comes less than two weeks from the midterm elections in which health care is playing a defining role.
Trump says he’s taking ‘revolutionary’ action to lower drug prices, allowing Medicare to negotiate directly with drug companies — Washington Post 10/25/2018 brexit
brexit We’re Headed for a Brexit Crashout By Yves Smith We’re on a path to the worst sort of Brexit: no plan, no transition period, and a U.K. financial crisis for which we’re totally unprepared. 10/25/2018 2038
2038 In 20 Years, the Internet Will Split in Two — Then Go to War With Itself By The Editors On this week’s episode of 2038 , journalist An Xiao Mina shares her prediction of an internet cold war. 10/25/2018 cloning
cloning Facebook’s Latest Innovation Is Cloning TikTok By Brian Feldman The gargantuan social network is working on a competitor for the popular lip-sync app. 10/25/2018 NYT: Google provided soft landing for employees accused of sexual misconduct
Mr. Rubin was one of three executives that Google protected over the past decade after they were accused of sexual misconduct. In two instances, it ousted senior executives, but softened the blow by paying them millions of dollars as they departed, even though it had no legal obligation to do so. In a third, the executive remained in a highly compensated post at the company. Each time Google stayed silent about the accusations against the men.
How Google Protected Andy Rubin, the ‘Father of Android’ — New York Times 10/25/2018 Speaking of things you really should be doing, when you’re done voting go out and get a flu shot
Fewer than 4 out of 10 adults in the United States got flu shots last winter, the lowest rate in seven seasons and one likely reason why the 2017-2018 season was the deadliest in decades.
Reports released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provide new details outlining the severity of the past flu season during which more people were killed than any seasonal influenza since the 1970s .
Flu vaccination is the main way to prevent sickness and death caused by flu. But last season, vaccination coverage among adults was 37.1 percent, a decrease of 6.2 percentage points from the previous season. That’s the lowest rate for adults 18 and older since 2010-2011.
Drop in adult flu vaccinations may be a factor in last season’s record-breaking deaths, illnesses — Washington Post 10/25/2018 bernie sanders
bernie sanders Sanders Makes a Strong Case Against the Saudis (and for Bernie 2020) By Eric Levitz Foreign policy gave Bernie Sanders’s last presidential campaign nothing but headaches. Now, it’s giving his next one a reason for being. 10/25/2018 Don’t worry, the Senate Judiciary Committee chair is still on the hunt for who REALLY made false statements to Congress
GRASSLEY has referred Avenatti and Swetnick to the Justice Department “for criminal investigation related to a potential conspiracy to provide materially false statements to Congress.” — @AaronBlake 10/25/2018 2018 midterms
2018 midterms Democrats Channeling Bad Memories From 2016 Into Motivating Voters By Ed Kilgore Will fears of another Election Night freak-out motivate Democrats or drive them to hide under their beds? 10/25/2018 In conclusion, don’t make ignorant remarks about blackface. Unless you want to be paid $69 million for not working
EXCLUSIVE: Megyn Kelly is OUT at NBC just 48 hours after defending blackface and the network will be forced to pay out her entire $69M contract https://t.co/yVSmw9c9Zr — @DailyMail Sign In to Comment

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Organ donor Jesus ad won’t go on air after 20,000+ sign petition

Organ donor Jesus ad won’t go on air after 20,000+ sign petition Published time: 25 Oct, 2018 03:25 Edited time: 25 Oct, 2018 09:03 Get short URL “What Would Jesus Do? – Donate Your Organs” clip from ‘Dying to Live’ documentary directed by Richard Bullock © YouTube / Dying To Live An advertisement showing a crucified Jesus Christ getting signed up for organ donation by ‘Roman soldiers’ will not air on Australian TV after a petition to pull the “blasphemous” ad racked up over 20,000 signatures.
The two-and-a-half-minute video was put on YouTube on October 14, and immediately triggered controversy online, with many Christians calling the advert “despicable” and “offensive.”
The clip, which was intended as a lead-in to the documentary ‘Dying to Live,’ shows two Roman soldiers approaching Jesus on a crucifix and asking him if he has registered for organ donation. They then educate him on the program and encourage him to sign up online, so he can save “up to seven lives.”
The soldiers, who appear extremely laid-back during the conversation at Golgotha, say that they have already filled the form for Jesus, so he only needs to tap on the screen to complete the registration process. A smartphone is extended to him on a spear tip. Before the registration is complete, the Romans remind Jesus that his family should be on board with the decision, which is luckily the case since both his parents – earthly father Joseph and mother Mary – enthusiastically approve of the cause.
The advert concludes with a tagline “Do what Jesus would do.”
The director of the short film, Richard Bullock, says it was a deliberate provocation, intended to “provoke a conversation in homes around the subject.” Read more ‘Hands off the crucifix’: Pope Francis adviser slams League’s ‘blasphemous’ bill
Start conversations it did, but the reaction has been predominantly negative. The video has been slammed online as an “idiotic,” “disrespectful,” and “blasphemous.”
Angry commenters accused Bullock of a “publicity stunt,” calling the ad insensitive and the use of Jesus’ figure insulting to the Christian religion.
“Organ donation is a good cause, I have no problem with the cause, I do however have a problem with this ad. It’s not that funny and needlessly disrespectful,” one user wrote.
Many agreed that while raising awareness about the lack of organ donors in Australia is a noble cause, the way the video was filmed is “taking humor denigrating Christ to a new low.”
Some pointed out that if Prophet Mohammed was featured in the video, the backlash would be far more fierce.
“Now do one for Buddha, oh, and Mohammed! How about Krishna? No?” a commenter wondered.
A petition to shelve the ad forever before it is even aired was launched on Change.org.
By Wednesday evening, the petition, which was set up roughly a week earlier, gained over 21,000 signatures. The author of the petition, Dane Craill, a surgical nurse, argued that “the advertisement itself is highly derogatory,” despite its benevolent cause.
It is disrespectful and undermines the power of the cross that we place our hope in.
In an update on Tuesday, Craill said that she was told by Australia’s AdStandards board that the advertiser confirmed that “the advertisement is not currently broadcast on television as an advertisement, and will not be broadcast on television.”
It’s unclear, Craill wrote, if the ad was turned down at the last minute or whether it was meant to be aired at all. Australian media reported that the ad was supposed to air earlier in October.
Now, Craill wants the short film to be removed “immediately” as well. “It is important that we let the ‘Dying to Live’ campaign know that we will not tolerate blasphemy towards Jesus Christ!” she wrote. She also warned that online organ donation registry can see an exodus of potential donors, as “many have stated that they will remove their organ donation registration as they cannot morally support such a campaign.”
If you like this story, share it with a friend! Reporting what the mainstream media won’t: Follow RT’s Twitter account 5 billion views and counting: Watch the best vids, subscribe to RT’s YouTube

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Momentum Builds For Nuclear Power With Referendum Approved In Taiwan And “Pride Fest” in Germany

Hours after pro-nuclear activists from Europe and the United States rallied in Germany to protest that nation’s replacement of nuclear plants with fossil fuels, Taiwan’s electoral commission gave the green light to a November referendum on the future of nuclear power “We are overjoyed,” said Taiwanese pro-nuclear leader, Shih-hsiu Huang . “If we win, we will immediately ask the government to finish construction of Lungmen [power plant], and allow the other three plants to resume normal operations.”
A victory in Taiwan to restart closed nuclear reactors would boost similar efforts in Japan, which is struggling to reopen nuclear plants in the face of continuing post-Fukushima fears, and in South Korea, whose anti-nuclear president has sought to reduce the nation’s use of the technology.
The mood was equally upbeat in Munich, Germany, where on Sunday over 200 pro-nuclear activists from around Europe gathered at Marienplatz, the city’s historic central plaza, for a “Nuclear Pride Fest” to protest societal prejudice against nuclear energy and launch their campaign to save Europe’s nuclear plants.
“I’m still amazed that it happened,” said Rebecca Lohfert Boas, who runs Ren Energi Oplysning , a Danish pro-nuclear group, on arriving home from Munich. “The creativity and warmth was inspiring.” The Fest was organized by a coalition of 12 pro-nuclear European NGOs .
The victory in Taiwan and the Fest in Munich give renewed momentum to grassroots pro-nuclear activists who helped save U.S. nuclear plants from premature closure in 2016 and restart construction of new reactors in South Korea in 2017.
Cracks are even showing in seemingly uniformly anti-nuclear Germany
Four of the 12 European NGOs that organized the Fest were German, and the day before the Fest another large German newspaper, Handelsblott, acknowledged that “German emissions haven’t decreased for nine years and carbon emissions from transportation haven’t fallen since 1990.” And while Germans attack U.S. President Trump, the paper noted, “in recent years the U.S. reduced emissions more than Germany in relative & absolute terms.”
The day of the Fest, Die Welt , one of Germany’s largest newspapers, published a fair-minded article about the event. “In the past few weeks there has been much talk of climate activists who have chained themselves into tree houses in Hambach Forest to stop coal mining,” noted Daniel Wetzel.
“But now a second group of climate protection activists are attracting attention: they are not protesting against, but for something… the return of nuclear power.”
Wetzel noted that Fest organizers were independent from the nuclear industry, that emissions rise when nuclear plants are closed, and that a recent IPCC climate report called for more nuclear power.
“At the very least Germany could stop trying to intimidate other European nations into shutting down their nuclear plants too,” Die Welt quotes German pro-nuclear leader, Amardeo Sarma, saying.
“Balloons, painted flowers and trees, a polar bear mascot named Melty” were highlights of the Fest. EP
Not all of the press notices attempted neutrality. After describing the Fest’s ” Balloons, painted flowers, trees, and a polar bear mascot named Melty,” Anna Hoben of Süddeutsche Zeitung, Munich’s largest paper, called the Fest a “weird event .” She then claimed that “If something happens” at a nuclear plant, “all the houses, trees and cows fall down.”
After noting that the name of the Fest was partly inspired by the gay rights movement’s strategy for encouraging gays to “come out” publicly in order to overcome social stigma and discrimination, Hoben wrote, “one does not know exactly how nuclear has been discriminated against.”
Aside from Germany’s active efforts to close its nuclear plants, and those of its neighbors , the European Union’s renewable energy directive actively discriminates against nuclear in favor of solar and wind.
Inspired by the Taiwanese, some pro-nuclear Europeans proposed a petition drive to change the discriminatory directive.
Advancing Nuclear
Nuclear provides 13% of Taiwan’s electricity but would provide 23% if the government allows the re-starting of three reactors in the wake of post-Fukushima fears.
Taiwan’s closed Lungmen nuclear plant which consists of two, GE-Hitachi’s ABWR reactors, is considered “advanced nuclear” because it has 72 hours of back-up “passive cooling” to prevent a Fukushima-type accident, as well as “core catchers” to safely contain molten fuel in case of meltdown.
Pro-nuclear Taiwanese must persuade their fellow citizens to vote to finish the near-completed advanced reactors.
On October 16 Taiwan’s government-run electoral commission rejected the pro-nuclear referendum, claiming organizers lacked the 281,745 valid signatures needed.
The activists went on a hunger strike, and then to court, which ruled last week that the electoral commission must count a second batch of 23,251 signatures. After the commission did so, it qualified the initiative for the November 23 ballot.
“Replacing Taiwan’s nuclear plants with fossil fuels has already increased the risk of death from air pollution,” warned a group of prestigious climate and environmental scientists last year. “Taiwan is one of the 10 worst countries in terms of the percentage of its citizens who are exposed to unsafe levels of air pollution, according to an international study published by Yale University last year.”
Taiwan would need 617 solar farms the size of its largest proposed solar farm, the scientists noted , at a cost of $71 billion, to replace its nuclear reactors — a sum that does not include the cost of batteries or land.
At post-Fest dinner, students debated where Nuclear Pride Fest 2019 should be held. EP
Back in Munich, the Nuclear Pride Fest included songs, speeches, visual explanations of why closing nuclear plants increases deadly air pollution, and free banana smoothies with information pointing out that eating one exposes one to more radiation than does living near a nuclear plant.
The day before the Fest, students from Europe, the U.S. and Asia gathered to discuss strategies for saving nuclear plants around the world
At the post-Fest dinner celebrating the day’s activities, pro-nuclear activists from Italy, France, Spain, Germany, and the Netherlands debated with good humor over where next year’s Nuclear Pride Fest should be held.
“I nominate the outstanding setting of the largest sea-front square in Europe — the Piazza Unità d’Italia in Trieste, Italy,” said Enrico Brandmayr of the Comitato Nucleare e Ragione.
Activists arguing for Paris countered that over 200,000 people work in nuclear power there, the most in Europe, and that its president, Emmanuel Macron, spoke out favorably for nuclear last December.

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