The other reasons you should care if Chris Pine gets naked (opinion) – CNN

Holly Thomas is a British writer and editor based in London. She tweets @HolstaT. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author. View more opinion articles on CNN.
(CNN) People are talking a lot about Chris Pine’s new film “Outlaw King,” in which he has apparently done some very decent acting, portraying Scottish king Robert the Bruce. But people are taking more note of his penis, which is fleetingly visible in the film, than his overall performance.
Holly Thomas The movie — which will arrive on Netflix on November 9 — premiered at the Toronto Film Festival to mixed reviews. It currently boasts a 46% critic score on Rotten Tomatoes, but a sturdy 95% “want to see” score. It’s not hard to intuit what might have inspired such curiosity. But Pine’s reasonable irritation at the focus on his body rather than his work over the last week (familiar no doubt to every women ever), and the exaggerated furor around his stripping off ought to be read as a symptom of injustice for all genders in the movie industry. The news of Pine’s full frontal scene has sparked a Twitter storm , a media frenzy , and showers of praise. Pine himself has been good-humored — if sometimes a little frustrated — in his responses to the fuss. Asked on the BBC’s “Graham Norton Show” whether he was keeping track of the comments, he replied : “Oh yeah, they’re um, effin’ brutal” (they really aren’t). After acknowledging that his nudity “got a lot of attention,” Pine shifted focus toward actress Florence Pugh, who portrays Elizabeth de Burgh in the film. “She’s a powerhouse, she’s already done incredible work and I’m sure will do more…[she] bares everything in the film, and no one talks about it,” he observed. Read More (He’s right, they really haven’t.) Can nudity crack Hollywood’s double standard? He continued , asking a question with no easy answer: “So, does no one talk about the fact that she bares everything because it’s expected of a woman to do that in film? Or that there’s a sense of decorum that one wouldn’t say that to a woman about having done that?… It’s an interesting double standard that women are expected to do it and that’s normal. Why is (it) not then for men?” The answer to these questions is complicated, but some of it is obvious. For a start, Pine is absolutely right: There is a double standard. Female nudity is nearly three times as common as male in Hollywood films, according to an annual report on women and girls in California. For many female actors — 26% in the top 100 grossing movies in 2014 — nudity is all in a day’s work. Yet male anatomy, which sees only a fraction of the screen time, seems to receive disproportionate attention. When male actors take their clothes off it is a novelty, the topic of Internet giggles and interview quips. Richard Gere is often revered as the “king” of male full-fronta l, his official coronation generally agreed to be his turn in 1980’s “American Gigolo.” Sharon Stone could lay reasonable claim as the most commented-on flasher ever for her famous interrogation scene in “Basic Instinct,” which came out in 1992. But by and large, naked women — and especially exposed breasts — are par for the course, and the limited noise they stir focuses on women’s individual figures , rather than the fact of the nudity itself. Hugh Hefner’s legacy has a dark side There is sometimes a media uproar when women take their clothes off in movies, if their nudity forms part of particularly explicit scenes. When “Blue is the Warmest Color,” a French coming-of-age love story between a school girl (played by Adele Exarchopoulos) and a slightly older woman (Lea Seydoux) debuted at Cannes in 2013, it received rapturous reviews . In an unprecedented move, the jury for the prestigious Palme D’Or gave the award to both the lead actors and its director, Abdellatif Kechiche. One of the most remarked-upon elements of the movie was the graphic sex scenes between the two women — one of whom, Adele, was only 18 at the time of filming. After it was released, Lea Seydoux was quoted saying that working on the scenes, the longest of which was shot over 10 days, had been “humiliating,” and that she had “felt like a prostitute.” Both actors were frank in their descriptions of Kechiche’s apparently brutal directing style. He responded with outbursts in the press, exclaiming “how indecent to talk about pain when doing one of the best jobs in the world!”, and calling Seydoux “arrogant” and “spoilt.” But for all his outrage latterly, he had enjoyed absolute control on set. Therein, it seems, lies some of the explanation to Chris Pine’s questions. Playboy played a role in the strong black woman I am today The amount of nudity there is on screen, whose nudity that is and how it is portrayed — after actors’ personal caveats are (hopefully) accounted for — is decided by the filmmakers. Last year, according to the organization Women and Hollywood , 92% of top-grossing films were directed by men. When women direct, they are much more likely to employ female writers and editors than men are. Without women on the creative side, it is considerably less likely that the female gaze will be taken into consideration. “I used to hate nudity in films,” actor, writer, producer and director Anna Biller told i-D magazine last year. “It seemed that having nudity in every movie was just a way to make the male hero a sexual conqueror and to cement the intended audience as male.” On pay, ‘The Crown’ was unfair to The Queen Biller, who wrote, produced, and directed 2016’s “The Love Witch,” and starred in 2007’s “Viva” (which she also wrote, produced and directed), pointed out that women’s roles are constrained by bad sexist writing, which she says relegates actresses to “either nagging wives or fantasy girlfriends, and the nudity made things that much worse.” It is notable that Chris Pine has also referred fondly to being “objectified for a day” during his role in last year’s “Wonder Woman,” which was directed by Patty Jenkins. In a gentle comic scene, the hero — played fantastically by Gal Gadot — walks in on Pine, who plays World War I soldier “Steve,” bathing naked in a pool. They talk for a few minutes and before she leaves she, who has never met a man before, asks him whether he is a generally “typical” example of his sex. He replies a little bashfully that he is “above average”. She is in charge, but his contribution is sweet, and in no way demeans either the character or actor. Discussing the filming with ETOnline later, Chris Pine reflected: “This happens to women so, so much, it’s about time. While it was fun, I think it’s the most compassionate I’ve felt toward women on what they may feel being sidelined or made to feel less important.” Follow CNN Opinion Join us on Twitter and Facebook
The democratization of nudity on-screen would be hugely advanced by moves toward equality off-screen. More women on and off camera, and heightened respect for all actors who take their clothes off in the line of duty would doubtless go a long way to redressing the balance. So to speak.

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18 things you might not know about Mexico’s Day of the Dead celebrations

18 things you might not know about Mexico’s Day of the Dead celebrations
Jeff Peterson Published: October 26, 2018 9:29 am Updated: yesterday View 5 Items J Pat Carter, AP Richard and Dara Lopez pose for photos in costumes celebrating the Day of the Dead activities in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011. Related Links Cats, monsters, ghosts and Buffy in these 5 new picture books for Halloween
The Day of the Dead — or El Día de los Muertos in Spanish — is about as Mexican as it gets, but this unique holiday has been gaining popularity outside of its native country for a while now thanks to its macabre humor and distinctive art. Anyone shopping for Halloween decorations has probably seen at least a few examples of it: colorfully painted skulls, images of festive skeletons dancing and decked out in garish hats, etc.
But the Day of the Dead isn’t just Mexico’s version of Halloween. There’s a lot more to it than that. Here are some facts you might not have known about this unique holiday but probably should:
1. It’s not celebrated on the same day as Halloween
Contrary to what a lot of people seem to think, El Día de los Muertos is traditionally celebrated on Nov. 2. However, it is part of a multi-day sequence of festivities that usually begins on the evening of Oct. 31. Collectively, the entire celebration is sometimes referred to as the Days of the Dead.
2. The day before is dedicated to remembering dead children
El Día de los Muertos is meant to honor the spirits of deceased adults . On Nov. 1, however, families gather to remember the spirits of children who passed away prematurely. This is called either El Día de los Inocentes (the Day of the Innocents) or El Día de los Angelitos (the Day of the Little Angels).
3. It’s really, really old
The Day of the Dead isn’t just different from Halloween, it’s also potentially much, much older, too. Historians trace its origins back as far as 3,000 years to ancient Mesoamerican festivals dedicated to the goddess of the Underworld, Mictecacihuatl. These festivals were traditionally held in the ninth month of the Aztec calendar, which roughly corresponds to August. However, in an attempt by Spanish conquistadors to make it a Christian holiday, it was moved to the end of October and beginning of November to coincide with the Catholic Allhallowtide triduum (basically, a fancy word for a three-day holiday): All Saints’ Eve on Oct. 31, All Saints’ Day on Nov. 1 and All Souls’ Day on Nov. 2. Moises Castillo, AP A woman rests next to the tomb of a relative in the cemetery in San Antonio Aguascalientes, Guatemala, where many converge to honor friends and family who have passed, marking the Day of the Dead holiday, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. The holiday honors the deceased on Nov. 1, coinciding with All Saints Day, and All Souls’ Day on Nov. 2.
4. It’s bigger than Christmas
The Day of the Dead is Mexico’s biggest religious holiday , with big public events like parades and gatherings at cemeteries (complete with mariachi bands) as well as more intimate celebrations that take place inside individual homes. Because of that, it can get expensive. Some families in rural parts of Mexico spend as much as two months’ income on lavish decorations and food specific to the holiday.
5. It’s a day to celebrate, not a day to mourn
Ever notice how even the skeletons look like they’re having a party in Day of the Dead art? It’s a far cry from how many Western cultures view death, but Mexicans take this lightness very seriously due to the belief that spirits who come to visit would be insulted if they found everyone in mourning. So instead, Day of the Dead is meant as a celebration of life. Family members get together to tell funny stories about deceased relatives and remember how they lived, not feel sorry for them.
6. Cleaning is a crucial part of the holiday
One of the main functions of the Day of the Dead is the cleaning of the graves. This is done both as part of the ritual to prepare for the very important visitors that will be coming (i.e. the spirits of the dead) as well as for pragmatic reasons — unlike in the United States, in Mexico, the majority of cemeteries are not privately owned and therefore have to be maintained by members of the community.
7. Altars to the dead show they haven’t been forgotten
Probably the main component of the Day of the Dead decorations is the altars, or more accurately, “offerings” (ofrendas in Spanish). Contrary to what the term “altar” implies, these are not for worship . Instead, each family assembles one as a way of paying tribute to the dead, with every part of the altar symbolizing something related to either the holiday or the dead ancestor/family member it’s dedicated to. This includes orange and yellow marigolds (cempazuchitl), copal incense, candles, pictures of the deceased, salt and water, traditional Day of the Dead foods and other things that might be specific to the individual person (favorite treats, toys for children, fashion magazines, etc.). Alexandre Meneghini, AP Frangerato Salvador, 8, dressed as a Katarina, stands beside her brother’s grave, marking the Day of the Dead holiday at the cemetery in San Gregorio, Mexico, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. The holiday honors the dead on Nov. 1, coinciding with All Saints Day and All Souls’ Day on Nov. 2.
8. The flowers attract ghosts
Cempazuchitl, the official flowers of the Day of the Dead, are used in massive quantities to decorate the graves and altars — a practice that has its roots in pre-Columbian traditions . These flowers (nicknamed el flor del muerto – “the flower of the dead”), sometimes said to represent the sun and rebirth, are also believed to help guide the spirits back home. In English, they are known as Mexican Merigolds.
9. Monarch butterflies are returning ancestors
Every year during the week of Nov. 2, parts of Mexico are swarmed with monarch butterflies that travel a staggering 3,000 miles all the way from Canada. The belief that the spirits of the dead could return in the form of hummingbirds or butterflies goes back all the way to the Aztecs, so it’s not hard to see why the monarch would become a key decorative motif.
10. Skulls and skeletons are everywhere (and a lot of them are edible)
From masks and costumes to face paint to ornately decorated candies piled on top of the altars as offerings to the dead, skulls (calaveras) and skeletons (calacas) are inescapable during the Day of the Dead festivities. (Bad news for anyone who suffers from skelephobia.) In particular, handmade sugar skulls (calaveras de Alfeñique) are an iconic part of the holiday. But hey, at least they aren’t real … anymore .
11. The most famous skeleton of them all is named La Catrina
Originally drawn as a political statement satirizing Mexicans who tried to adopt European cultural customs in place of their own, ” La Calavera Catrina ” (or “La Calavera Garbancera,” as she was first called) was the creation of Mexican artist José Guadalupe Posada circa 1910. Since then, she has become one of the most recognizable images found in Day of the Dead artwork. Mexican muralist Diego Rivera even featured her prominently in one of his most famous pieces, ” Dream of a Sunday Afternoon .” J Pat Carter, AP Katiana Rodriguez poses for photos in costume celebrating the Day of the Dead activities in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011.
12. The dead get their own bread
Pan de muerto , which translates as “bread of the dead,” is another holiday treat. A sweet egg bread, it includes ingredients like anise and orange peel. Usually, pan de muerto is decorated with strips of dough arranged on top to look like crossed bones.
13. Spending a night in the cemetery is commonplace
To Americans, it might sound like a predictable setup to a horror movie, but in some parts of Mexico, spending a night inside a graveyard , picnicking next to a dead family member’s grave, telling stories, listening to music and just generally making merry is all part of the celebration.
14. Practices vary from region to region
Not every place celebrates the Day of the Dead in the same way. Different parts of Mexico (as well as Latin America) have different local traditions. In a town called Pomuch in the Yúcatan Peninsula, for example, part of the annual celebration includes removing the bones of one’s ancestors from the tombs and “washing” or dusting them by hand.
15. Failing to celebrate can be dangerous
If this all sounds like a lot of time and energy and money, well, just remember, not celebrating could be even more costly. According to tradition, if the dead return home and find that their family has failed to build them a suitable altar, they sometimes get revenge. That can manifest in a variety of ways, including sickness and even death .
16. Day of the Dead isn’t a one-time deal
Unlike Halloween, which was thought to be a special time of year — the one night when the dead were allowed to return to the world of the living — the Day of the Dead isn’t a special, once-a-year event for spirits . According to traditional beliefs, the dead come and go all the time, stopping in to visit living family members on a frequent basis. Instead, the Day of the Dead is more like Christmas: It’s meant to remind the living of things they should be trying to remember all year round. J Pat Carter, AP From left, Monica Taylor, Emily DeFabia and her dad, Jim DeFabia, pose for photos in costumes celebrating the Day of the Dead (Dia de los Muertos) activities in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011. The family members, who also work at Renaissance festivals, tried three times before they perfected their costumes.
17. It’s officially a big deal, and not just for Mexicans
Not only has the Day of the Dead been made a national holiday in Mexico, but it has also been recognized by UNESCO as an intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.
18. It’s made it to Hollywood
The unique folk art associated with the Day of the Dead was a key influence on both Tim Burton’s “Nightmare Before Christmas” as well as “Corpse Bride,” and the Day of the Dead has featured prominently in movies like “The Book of Life” and Daniel Craig’s 2015 James Bond movie, “ Spectre .” But that’s not all, it’s also made its way into video games like “Grim Fandango” and “Guacamelee!” Not bad for a 3,000-year-old holiday.
Check out local Day of the Dead celebrations:
Day of the Dead Celebration, Oct. 27, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Utah Cultural Celebration Center, Outdoor Amphitheatre, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, $5 for adults, free for children ages 12 and younger ( culturalcelebration.org )
Day of the Dead Celebration, Oct. 27, 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Thanksgiving Point, Show Barn, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, Lehi, $8 for adults, $2 for children ages 3-12, free for children ages 2 and younger (801-768-2300 or thanksgivingpoint.org )
Dia de los Muertos Storytime, Nov. 1, 5 p.m., The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, (801-484-9100 or kingsenglish.com )
Day of the Dead Celebration, Nov. 2, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Southern Utah Museum of Art, 13 S. 300 West, Cedar City, free (435-586-7700 or suu.edu/events )
“Day of the Dead” art by SUU students, through Nov. 10, times vary, Southern Utah Museum of Art, Sorenson Center for the Arts, SUU, Cedar City, free (435-586-5432 or suu.edu )
Libraries:
Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, sugar skulls craft, Oct. 30, 4 p.m.; and Dia de los Muertos festival, Nov. 2, 4 p.m. (801-594-8632)
Bingham Creek Library, 4834 W. 9000 South, West Jordan, Dia de los Muertos celebration, Oct. 30, 7 p.m. (801-943-4636)

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Apple Remote Desktop, possibly.
As for stopping it, a typical system setup configured for remote access can’t be blocked, short of disconnecting or powering down the Mac computer. That absent admin access to the Mac,
Might want to contemplate what you’ll do after a potential expulsion here too, as some schools have no sense of humor around attempts to disable or defeat school systems and security, or interfering with teachers’ activities.

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