17 Tumblr Posts That Prove Spider-Man Is Definitely A Gen Z Kid

Share On facebook Share On facebook Share Share On vk Share On vk Share Share On pinterest Share On pinterest Share On pinterest Share On pinterest Pin Share On lineapp Share On lineapp Share On twitter Share On twitter Share Share On email Share On email Email Share On sms Share On sms Share On whatsapp Share On whatsapp Share On more Share On more More Share On tumblr Share On tumblr Share On link Share On link Share On copy Share On copy Copy Link 1. On teaching slang to the other Avengers: the-marvelous-spidey.tumblr.com 2. On Peter’s (potential) return to life: ironmanstan.tumblr.com 3. On being friends with Shuri: underoosie.tumblr.com 4. On which Avengers understand Gen Z humor: raven-the-redhead.tumblr.com 5. On the Tide Pod challenge: ironmanstan.tumblr.com 6. On Peter’s extreme strength: ironmanstan.tumblr.com 7. On tagging his friends: superfamilyincorrectQuote: : s.tumblr.com 8. On the truth behind his spider-centric identity: livspec.tumblr.com 9. On Peter’s other secret identity: spder-ling / Tumblr 10. On making Gen Z jokes to Thor: falloutboyzintheattic / Tumblr / Via aughtpunk.tumblr.com 11. On expressing his feelings: dont-trust-a-doe / Tumblr / Via soratayuya.tumblr.com 12. On Thanos’s supposed threat: itsallavengers.tumblr.com 13. On worrying Tony Stark: the-light-of-luna.tumblr.com 14. On worrying Tony Stark some more: stonyslovestory.tumblr.com 15. On where Peter got his inspiration for the Spider-Man costume: daisys-quake.tumblr.com 16. On getting out of any situation: marvelous-headcanons-galore.tumblr.com 17. On setting up his YouTube channel: steverogersisbuckybarnesbitch.tumblr.com Top trending videos Facebook Twitter Copy Copy link Watch more BuzzFeed Video Caret right Top trending videos Watch more BuzzFeed Video Caret right Watch more BuzzFeed Video Caret right Top trending videos Facebook Share Twitter Tweet Copy Copy link Watch more BuzzFeed Video Caret right Share On facebook Share On facebook Share Share On vk Share On vk Share Share On pinterest Share On pinterest Share On pinterest Share On pinterest Pin Share On lineapp Share On lineapp Share On twitter Share On twitter Share Share On email Share On email Email Share On sms Share On sms Share On whatsapp Share On whatsapp Share On more Share On more More Share On tumblr Share On tumblr Share On link Share On link Share On copy Share On copy Copy Link The best things at three price points The best things at three price points More BuzzFeed Reviews More BuzzFeed Reviews View Comments

Read More…

‘They all look alike’: Hillary Clinton corrects moderator who mixed up black Democrats

Home Newswire Hillary Clinton corrects moderator who mixed up black Democrats — RT US… Hillary Clinton corrects moderator who mixed up black Democrats — RT US News By – Oct 30, 2018: 10:21 am
Conservative commentators are outraged that former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton made a racist joke, saying African-Americans “all look alike” while correcting her interviewer who mixed up two Democrat politicians.
Video of the exchange first began making the rounds on Monday. It shows Clinton getting interviewed on Friday on a stage in New York, by Kara Swisher of the tech news site Recode.
“What do you think of Cory Booker,” Swisher asked, “saying ‘kick them in the shins,’ essentially?”
“Well that was Eric Holder,” Clinton shot back, deadpanning a beat later,
Yeah, I know they all look alike.
Clinton would, of course, know it was Holder who said that. The former attorney general in the Obama administration argued that Democrats should “kick” Republicans who take the low moral ground mere days after Clinton herself told CNN that one “cannot be civil with a political party that wants to destroy what you stand for, what you care about.” Hillary Clinton corrects interviewer who mixed-up black politicians Eric Holder and Cory Booker by saying, “I know they all look alike”
Seriously.
Moreover, Holder’s short-cropped grey hair and dark mustache set him apart from the bald-headed, clean-shaven senator from New Jersey, even though they are both African-American.
Read more
Conservative Twitterati were quick to point the accusing finger at Clinton for being racist and claim that a Republican politician would get crucified for the comment, even if they conceded the quip may have been a joke aimed at Swisher’s obvious mistake. Conservatives from President Donald Trump himself to Florida gubernatorial candidate Ron DeSantis have been accused of racism for “dog whistles” and “code words” somehow only Democrats hear.
Clinton had just finished arguing that what some call “political correctness” was “just politeness” that Democrats valued because they were all about diversity.
“I don’t want to go around insulting people. I don’t want to paint with a broad brush every immigrant is this, every African-American is that, every, you know, other person with different religious beliefs or whatever — that’s childish,” she had just told Swisher before the Booker-Holder mix-up.
Caught by Clinton’s remark, Swisher merely responded with “Oh, well done,” as the former secretary of state smiled at her own wit. And why not – the racially loaded quip was unscripted and seemed far more genuine than Clinton’s previous attempts at humor, from reacting to the murder of Libya’s ruler with “We came, we saw, he died!” in 2011 to the cringe-worthy “How about Pokemon Go-to-the-polls?” during the 2016 campaign.
Like this story? Share it with a friend!
Via RT . This piece was reprinted by RINF Alternative News with permission or license.

Read More…

Pittsburgh synagogue shooting victims: Their stories – CNN

Pittsburgh (CNN) Cecil and David Rosenthal were familiar faces at Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life synagogue.
The brothers from Squirrel Hill sat in the back of the temple and greeted people as they came in to worship, said Suzan Hauptman, who grew up in the synagogue. Cecil, 59, was tall and gregarious, she said. His younger brother, 54-year-old David, was the serious one. “They were like the ambassadors,” she said. “They were always there. And they will always be there in our hearts.” The brothers were among 11 devoted worshippers who died after a gunman stormed the synagogue on Saturday morning. Read More The victims include a spry nonagenarian, a couple who were married in the synagogue, and a family physician remembered for the bow ties he wore and the care he provided, often to multiple generations of the same families. Here are their stories: Irving Younger Irving Younger, left Irving Younger of Mount Washington also greeted Tree of Life members and visitors with a big smile and a handshake, a friend said. “He was a guy that, when you walked in, he was the first person that would meet you and help you find a seat,” his pal and former Tree of Life president Barton Schachter told CNN. “He liked to make sure you knew where you were in the prayer book. It was his duty. He felt responsible. He felt like his role was to help serve.” It was a role that came naturally to the charismatic 69-year-old, who had been frequenting the synagogue for at least 10 years, Schachter said. A former real estate agent, Younger used to have an office on one of Squirrel Hill’s main thoroughfares. More recently, he enjoyed spending time at one of the sidewalk tables in front of a local coffee shop, where he appointed himself as greeter, Schachter said. Years ago, Younger coached Little League, said Meryl Ainsman, whose son played on his team. She remembered him as a kind man. Melvin Wax Melvin Wax Melvin Wax’s greatest passions were his grandson, his religion and the Pittsburgh Pirates. He was “always in a good mood, always full of jokes,” his sister told CNN affiliate WTAE . The 88-year-old accountant was usually among the first to arrive at Friday night and Saturday morning services, Bonnie Wax said. He was well-versed in reciting Jewish prayer. “The synagogue for him was very important. We always used to kid with him that you should have been a rabbi,” she said. Upon learning of the shooting, she immediately feared that her brother could have been one of gunman’s victims. “He’d always be early, so when I heard this happened, I kind of said to myself, ‘Ugh,'” his sister said. “I was hoping it wasn’t Melvin, and unfortunately, he was one of the victims.” Rose Mallinger Rose Mallinger Despite her age, friends described the 97-year-old Squirrel Hill woman as spry and vibrant, someone who seemed far from death’s door. “She had a lot of years left,” friend Robin Friedman said. Family friend Stephen Neustein said he fully expected her to make it to at least 100. The mother of three children, with five grandchildren and one great-grandchild, she still cooked family meals for high holidays, Neustein said. “She was very smart, very intelligent, smart as a tack,” he said. Friedman said Mallinger was a secretary in her school’s office when she was growing up. Mallinger regularly attended the synagogue with her daughter, Friedman said. She likely knew everyone there because that’s how she was, Friedman said — a sweet and lovely lady who was quick with a friendly greeting, a hug and a smile. Relative Elisa Schwartz called Mallinger “one of the matriarchs of the family.” Mallinger was a first cousin to Schwartz’s grandmother. “We used to have a cousins’ club to celebrate Hanukkah and gathered for Seders at Passover,” Schwartz said on Facebook. “Tree of Life is actually an appropriate name for how our community has come together. I will be mourning the loss of Rose and the 10 others who have lost their lives too soon as well as praying for the others that were injured,” she said. Bernice and Sylvan Simon Sylvan, 86, left, and Bernice Simon, 84. The Simons died together in the same synagogue where they wed more than 60 years ago. According to their 1956 wedding announcement in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, the couple married at Tree of Life synagogue. The bride carried a Bible with white orchids and streamers of stephanotis, and wore a gown of ivory chantilly lace and tulle trimmed with sequins. Their neighbor in Wilkinsburg described them as the “sweetest people you could imagine.” Jo Stepaniak said she lived next to 84-year-old Bernice and 86-year-old Sylvan for nearly 40 years. They were the kind of people who regularly stepped up to help in their small neighborhood and in the Jewish community. “They wanted to give back to people and be kind,” Stepaniak said. “They were loving and giving and kind.” Jerry Rabinowitz Jerry Rabinowitz Jerry Rabinowitz touched the lives of many, both as a primary care physician in Edgewood Borough and a member of Dor Hadash — one of three congregations scheduled to celebrate Sabbath at Tree of Life on Saturday. Susan Blackman said she knew Rabinowitz for 35 years. He was the family doctor for her and her three children, and she said she saw him every quarter. “He was like a member of the family,” she said. “I can’t imagine the world without him.” Rabinowitz was known for wearing bow ties that made people smile and put his patients at ease, his nephew, Avishai Ostrin said on Facebook. “You know how they say there are people who just lighten up a room? You know that cliché about people whose laugh is infectious? That was Uncle Jerry,” he wrote. “It wasn’t a cliché. It was just his personality.” The Dor Hadash congregation was like a second home for Rabinowitz, said Deborah Friedman, another one of Rabinowitz’s patients. When she spoke about Rabinowitz on Sunday, she started to speak in the present tense, but quickly stopped herself. “He was a wonderful guy,” she said. Ostrin said his uncle was not in the basement where the congregation was gathered, but outside the room. “Why? Because when he heard shots he ran outside to try and see if anyone was hurt and needed a doctor. That was Uncle Jerry, that’s just what he did.” Ostrin said if there was a message his uncle would want everyone to take from the tragedy, “it would be a message of love, unity, and of the strength and resilience of the Jewish people.” Joyce Fienberg Joyce Fienberg Joyce Fienberg, 75, had a long career at the University of Pittsburgh as a research specialist from 1983 until her retirement in 2008. Her employers at the Learning Research and Development Center called her a “cherished friend” and “an engaging, elegant, and warm person.” She was just as beloved by Ph.D. students of her husband, Stephen, an acclaimed statistician who taught at Carnegie Mellon University for 36 years. He passed away two years ago after battling cancer. The couple opened their home to Stephen’s students and treated them like family, former student Jason Connor said. Joyce would send cards to her husband’s students long after they left Carnegie Mellon, Connor said. “She was a very petite woman but lit up a room with her huge personality. We weren’t just welcome in the classroom, but into their home,” Connor said. “Everyone says this, but she really was an enormously caring person.” She had two sons, and was also a grandmother, Connor told CNN. Fienberg grew up at the Holy Blossom Temple in Toronto, the temple said on its Facebook page. She lived in Pittsburgh’s Oakland neighborhood, not far from Squirrel Hill. Richard Gottfried Dr. Richard Gottfried Richard Gottfried was Jewish, and his wife, Peg Durachko, was Catholic. Together, they opened a dental practice in 1984 and helped prepare other couples for marriage through the St. Athanasius church. In 1996, the couple joined the Discovery Study Club, a local group that’s part of an international organization of dentists and specialists who offer educational lectures and workshops in dentistry, according to the practice’s website. The couple was a fixture in the community of Ross Township, said Patrick Mannarino, North Hills School District superintendent. Gottfried, 65, was the district’s dentist for a long time, Mannarino said. “We are deeply saddened by this tragedy,” he added, “and our thoughts and condolences go out to all of those affected, including Dr. Durachko and her loved ones.” Daniel Stein Daniel Stein Joe Stein said his father Daniel was a “simple man” who “did not require much.” The news of his death left their family devastated. “Our lives now are going to have to take a different path, one that we thought would not happen for a long time,” Joe Stein said on Facebook. The 71-year-old retiree lived in Squirrel Hill with his wife, nephew Steven Halle told CNN affiliate WPXI . Halle said he and his family were shocked by his uncle’s sudden death at the synagogue, where Stein went every Saturday. “He was a great guy,” Halle said. “He was a fun guy, he had a dry sense of humor and everybody loved him.” Brothers Cecil and David Rosenthal David Rosenthal, left, and Cecil Rosenthal. ACHIEVA, a Pittsburgh nonprofit that provides support for people with disabilities, posted a statement about the Rosenthal brothers, calling them “two well-respected members of our community” and “extraordinary men.” According to their obituaries posted by the Ralph Schugar Chapel, Cecil was a devoted Tree of Life congregant. David worked for Goodwill Industries and was described as a hard worker who was frequently recognized for his dedication. “Cecil’s laugh was infectious. David was so kind and had such a gentle spirit. Together, they looked out for one another,” said Chris Schopf, a vice president for residential support at ACHIEVA. “They were inseparable. Most of all, they were kind, good people with a strong faith and respect for everyone around.” Laura Berman, the cantor of Temple Sinai, said Cecil was a “beautiful man” and a “sweet, gentle soul.” “The kindest soul you would ever meet,” she said. “A smiling face. He was one of those embodiments of the community. Just open, warm, smiling, wanting to help and just in his beautiful simplicity. That’s who he was.”

Read More…