Retired St. Louis cop shot to death in robbery attempt south of Tower Grove Park

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ST. LOUIS • A St. Louis sergeant who spent 33 years policing the city before retiring was fatally wounded in a shootout with a would-be robber near Tower Grove Park on Monday morning.
Ralph E. Harper, 67, who retired from the department in 2007, was pronounced dead at a hospital about two hours after he was shot in the botched robbery.
“This is … very close to home because I knew the sergeant personally,” Police Chief John Hayden said outside Barnes-Jewish Hospital on Monday, moments after the sergeant was pronounced dead. Hayden choked back tears and his voice was halting as he talked with reporters.
“We are all mourning together,” he said. “This is a very challenging … very challenging time.” +15
St. Louis Police Sgt. Ralph E. Harper in a photo released by the department. Harper, who was retired from the department, was shot and killed during a robbery attempt in St. Louis on Monday, Oct. 29, 2018.
Harper was shot about 7:30 a.m. in the 3100 block of Lackland Avenue. Police say he was parking his car when he was approached by an armed robber. Harper had his own gun and exchanged shots with the robber, police said. It wasn’t clear who fired first, but both were hit in the shootout.
The injured robber got in a dark Honda Pilot SUV, which sped off, police said. The SUV went to Barnes-Jewish Hospital and dropped off the suspected robber — a male teen with a gunshot wound to his wrist — before again fleeing.
Meanwhile, the wounded former sergeant called 911. An ambulance escorted by police cars took him up Kingshighway to the same hospital, where he arrived shortly after the injured robber. He was pronounced dead about two hours later.
A description of the SUV used in the robbery was broadcast on police radio. Officers spotted it and chased it to the area of Allen and South Jefferson avenues, where it crashed into a building about 10 a.m. Two people, one of them a juvenile, were arrested there, but neither of them was injured during the crash, police said.
The juvenile was taken to a hospital in an ambulance as a precaution, police said. Detectives are still trying to determine whether the two arrested after the crash were involved in Harper’s homicide.
The SUV had been stolen from Olivette on Oct. 23, police said. +15
St. Louis police officers work at Allen and South Jefferson avenues where a Honda SUV crashed into a building at the end of a police chase on Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. The SUV was wanted in connection with the robbery and shooting of a retired officer, who later died at a hospital. Photo by Robert Cohen, Robert Cohen +15
A handcuffed teen is taken to an ambulance after police officers caught him in a crashed Honda SUV that hit a building after being chased by police at Allen and South Jefferson avenues on Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. The SUV was wanted in connection with the robbery and shooting of a retired officer, who later died at a hospital. Photo by Robert Cohen, Robert Cohen A police family
Jeff Roorda, business manager for the St. Louis Police Officers Association, said the Harper family is one of the “most well-known families in the police department.” Ralph Harper was one of four brothers who followed their father into law enforcement in St. Louis. The family together has more than 200 years of service in the department, Roorda said. +15
St. Louis Police Sgt. Ralph E. Harper in an image released by the department. Harper, who was retired from the department, was shot and killed during a robbery attempt in St. Louis on Monday, Oct. 29, 2018.
Harper was known as a go-to guy for young policemen, said retired Sgt. David Bonenberger.
He recalled a time when he had a complicated arrest report to write involving multiple suspects, pieces of evidence and weapons. Harper stuck around for hours, off the clock, to help write up the report.
“He was a sweet man, a genuine, caring individual,” Bonenberger said. “Even though he was a sweet, teddy-bear kind of guy, when it hit the fan, you were glad he was there with you. You’d follow him.”
Harper always made himself and his sense of humor known at luncheons for the St. Louis Police Veterans Association, which has about 900 retired police officers as members, said George Ratermann, president of the group.
“He would always try to make at least one motion during the meeting,” Ratermann recalled. “He told me later he did it to make sure his name got into the minutes so he could prove to his wife that he was actually there.”
Ratermann said Harper’s final act — getting a shot off at his attacker — helped solve the case, and might even help solve others if the same suspects are responsible for other crimes.
“I’m hoping they can pin a bunch of crimes on these suspects, and that would have done some good,” he said. “Then it could get them off the street and make the neighborhood a little safer.
“But (Harper) would have preferred to be the person booking him rather than being the person shot.” A violent day
The shooting on Lackland was just south of Tower Grove Park and a few blocks east of Kingshighway. Harper doesn’t live there, but one neighbor said a relative of Harper’s lives on the block.
Ratermann said the Harper family grew up in a house not far from Tower Grove Park.
Neighbors near the shooting scene said they heard four or five shots. One man told the Post-Dispatch he saw a man run to an alley, where a dark SUV was waiting for him. Someone else was driving the SUV, the witness said. The SUV then sped off. He did not want his name used because he feared for his safety.
The man said he went to the spot in the alley where the SUV had been. He saw a key on the ground and picked it up.
Then he saw someone lying in the street. The man later gave the key he found to police and was told that the key belonged to Harper. +15
A resident on Lackland Avenue talks to police officers near the scene where a retired police officer was shot during a robbery attempt in Tower Grove South on Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. The retired sergeant later died at the hospital. Photo by Robert Cohen, Robert Cohen
Harper’s death came on a violent day in the city he once policed. Two people were found shot to death in the North Pointe neighborhood later in the morning. Then a man was critically wounded in a shooting near Fairground Park, and later a woman’s body was found in the Baden neighborhood. It wasn’t clear how she died.
Dan Noecker, a resident who heard the gunshots that killed Harper, said he has lived in the Shaw and Tower Grove South neighborhoods for about 30 years.
“You always want to tell your friends that the city is not that dangerous, and you kind of expect some crime as part of the territory,” Noecker said. “But on the other hand, I don’t see why it can’t stop.”
Erin Heffernan and Kim Bell of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

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To Combat Harassment, More Companies Should Try Bystander Training

ICHIRO/Getty Images As the wave of #MeToo stories have come to light over the past year, it’s become painfully clear that whatever organizations are doing to try to prevent sexual harassment isn’t working.
Ninety-eight percent of companies say they have sexual harassment policies. Many provide anti-sexual harassment training. Some perpetrators have been fired or fallen from grace. And yet more than four decades after the term “sexual harassment” was first coined, it remains a persistent and pervasive problem in virtually every sector and in every industry of the economy, our new Better Life Lab report finds. It wreaks financial, physical, and psychological damage, keeping women and other targets out of power or out of professions entirely. It also costs billions in lost productivity, wasted talent, public penalties, private settlements, and insurance costs.
So what does work? Or might?
Sadly, there’s very little evidence-based research on strategies to prevent or address sexual harassment. The best related research examines sexual assault on college campuses and in the military. That research shows that training bystanders how to recognize, intervene, and show empathy to targets of assault not only increases awareness and improves attitudes, but also encourages bystanders to disrupt assaults before they happen, and help survivors report and seek support after the fact.
Researchers and workplace experts are now exploring how to prevent sexual harassment in companies by translating that approach. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in its 2016 task force report encouraged employers to offer bystander training, for one. And New York City passed a law in May requiring all companies with more than 15 employees to begin providing bystander training by April 2019. It could prove a promising, long-term solution.
But culture change is hard — it can take anywhere from months to several years , experts say . It’s much easier to go for the annual, canned webinar training on sexual harassment that checks the legal-liability box. Yet culture change is exactly why bystander interventions could be powerful: the strategy recognizes that, when it comes to workplace culture, everyone is responsible for creating it, every day, in every interaction.
Jane Stapleton, co-director of the Prevention Innovations Research Center at the University of New Hampshire and an expert in bystander interventions, told me about an all-too-familiar scenario: Say there’s a lecherous guy in the office — someone who makes off-color jokes, watches porn at his cubicle, or hits on younger workers. Everyone knows who he is. But no one says anything. Co-workers may laugh uncomfortably at his jokes, or ignore them. Maybe they’ll warn a new employee to stay away from him. Maybe not. “Everybody’s watching, and nobody’s doing anything about it. So the message the perpetrator gets is, ‘My behavior is normal and natural,’” Stapleton said. “No one’s telling him, ‘I don’t think you should do that.’ Instead, they’re telling the new intern, ‘Don’t go into the copy room with him.’ It’s all about risk aversion — which we know through decades of research on rape prevention, does not stop perpetrators from perpetrating.”
When bystanders remain silent, and targets are the ones expected to shoulder responsibility for avoiding, fending off, or shrugging off offensive behavior, it normalizes sexual harassment and toxic or hostile work environments. So bystander intervention, which Stapleton and others are beginning to develop for workplaces, is designed to help everyone find their voice and give them tools to speak up.
It’s all about building a sense of community. “Bystander intervention is not about approaching women as victims or potential victims, or men as perpetrators, or potential perpetrators” she said. “Rather, it’s leveraging the people in the environment to set the tone for what’s acceptable and what’s not acceptable behavior.”
At the most fundamental level, bystander interventions could begin — long before an incident of harassment — with workers having non-threatening, informal conversations in unstressed moments about how to treat each other, how they can help each other do their jobs or make their days better, and practice giving positive feedback. Normalizing talking about behavior and defining respectful behaviors everyone agrees on may make it easier for coworkers to see and give negative feedback if a worker later crosses a line, Fran Sepler, who for 30 years has worked as a consultant, trainer, and investigator on workplace harassment prevention, told me in an interview. “So when a co-worker tells an offensive joke, it’s easier to say, ‘Remember how we talked, and we all agreed about what’s OK to say at work? That’s not it.’”
In testimony before the EEOC , Sepler suggested organizations create “feedback rich” environments, where middle managers are trained to respond to complaints and issues in an emotionally intelligent way, and where people feel comfortable speaking up and listening, no matter the issue.
In campus settings, bystanders are trained to recognize when a sexual assault may be imminent and intervene by, for instance, disrupting the environment — turning the lights on at a party, or turning the music off — defusing the situation, with humor perhaps, distracting or interrupting a potential perpetrator, drawing a potential target away, or drawing others in.
But disrupting sexual harassment in the workplace requires a very different set of tools. “Too often people let things slide, concerned that if they get involved, it might affect their own career aspirations,” Alberto Rodríguez. supervising attorney for the New York City Commission on Human Rights, told me.
Because careers and reputations can be on the line, Sepler suggests considering a matrix of questions before acting: “Can I have an impact? Is it safe? What is the best strategy given the culture of the organization and my level of influence?”
Bystanders in the workplace can defuse harassing or offensive language or situations with humor, she said, or verbal or nonverbal expressions of disapproval. They can interrupt a situation by changing the subject, or inserting themselves into the situation. “If it’s the first time you hear someone say something offensive, you might try humor as a way of getting their attention, making a caustic remark, or saying, ‘What year is this? 1970?’ as a way of getting their attention,” Sepler said. Even so, she cautioned that bystanders must weigh whether the colleague has the reputation for being a jerk. Another option bystanders could consider is having a conversation after the fact, when tensions have cooled, laying out why the behavior was offensive.
For a harassing boss or someone who holds power over your career or livelihood, where direct confrontation could be riskier, defusion, distraction, or interruption are still possible tools for bystanders in the moment. And after the fact, bystanders can also seek out a supervisor or influencer, make a report, or help a target make a report.
At a minimum, bystanders can always show support to targets, who often feel isolated, humiliated, diminished, and alone after a harassing incident. “Going to someone and saying, ‘I saw how they were treating you. I didn’t like it. Is there anything I can do to help?’ Or, ‘It’s not your fault, let’s go talk with human resources.’ That might be all you can do,” Sepler said. “That’s not nothing.”

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Žena u ovom horoskopskom znaku je jaka kao stena i prva u svemu – AstroZabava – Zodijak

Žena rođena u ovom znaku Zodijaka je toliko puta pala i nastavila da je sada jača nego ikada. AstroZabava | zenskimagazin.rs/superzena 08:20 Tweet Podeli foto: Thinkstock
Ona ne poznaje granice i uvek traži istinu. Govorimo o ženi koja je rođena u znaku Strelca.
Ona je jaka
Žena koja je rođena u ovom znaku je osoba koja može biti prva u svemu. Stvarno pokušava da bude uspešna i mnogo ulaže u svoje znanje. Bori se da postigne najbolje rezultate u svim oblastima života.
Zanimljiva je i zbog toga se stalno razvija
Strelčevi su uvek radoznali. Ovim znakom upravlja kuća filozofije, a žena Strelac traži istinu u svim okolnostima. Duboko istražuje svakog muškarca, ženu ili dete, a njeni razgovore mogu se odnositi na sve – od religije i politike, do seksualne orijentacije.
Ništa nije van granica ili tabua u njenoj potrazi za odgovorima
Ona je svestrana i zaista šarmantna ličnost. Uvek uživa u novim iskustvima. Žene Strelčevi su obično iskrene i nezavisne, a ova kombinacija je zaista atraktivna.
Iako joj se ponekad javlja želja da bude sama, ona voli da bude u društvu. Mržnju ne može da podnese.
Njena prirodna veselost i smisao za humor igraju ogromnu ulogu u odnosima prema ljudima. Ona je otvorena, lojalna. U ljubavi, prva želja joj je da sretnete muškarca koji će joj se diviti i koga će moći da predstavi prijateljima bez imalo ustručavanja.
Čovek njenog života mora otvoreno da iskaže svoju ljubav i da je na svaki način dokaže. Da li je ljubomorna? Ne mnogo. Ipak, prevaru neće nikada oprostiti…

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