‘Last Man Standing’ star Tim Allen mocks liberals ‘small window of sense of humor’

Political Published 22 hours ago ‘Last Man Standing’ star Tim Allen mocks liberals ‘small window of sense of humor’ By Tyler McCarthy | Fox News close Video Tim Allen gets the last laugh After a huge season seven premiere on FOX, Tim Allen’s ‘Last Man Standing’ proves switching networks can pay off.
With the return of “Last Man Standing” on Fox, Tim Allen has the chance to continue doing what he loves, presenting an alternative point of view in comedy. In a recent interview, the actor is opening up about the political divide in America and having to answer for his character’s outspoken opinions.
When ABC pulled the plug on the sitcom after six successful seasons, many wondered if the character of Mike Baxter’s personal politics had something to do with the decision by the network to ax the right-leaning humor show. The series made its return on Fox for Season 7, where Allen and the writers pulled no punches when it came to skewering what he perceives to be an over-sensitive American left.
“I said there’s nothing, especially in this area, that pisses people off more than a very funny conservative. A smart, funny conservative that takes shots and is certainly self-effacing. The left-wing point of view is so pervasive that they don’t even realize it’s a point of view. It is just a point of view,” Allen said in an interview with IndieWire . “I think this character likes that, he likes to have another point of view. It makes him sharper and more interesting. But we don’t push it. I don’t think we’ve mentioned pro or con Trump once now.”
Still, despite his propensity for wanting to disrupt the general consensus of what’s funny and politically correct, Allen admits that it’s difficult when fans equate his personal beliefs to that of the character he plays.
“I did an interview and I said, ‘Are you asking Mike Baxter this question, because you heard something about the Clintons that the writers had written?’ Now, I’ll put something behind it, because I think it’s funny to make fun of people that are full of themselves. Liberals have a very small window of sense of humor about themselves, so I love poking at it. Two years ago, it was the conservatives, or whatever it is. But right now liberals, particularly progressives, hide behind large concepts. If you don’t agree with them, if you don’t agree with that position, then you hate women, and you hate gay people, and you hate pro-choice people, whatever. And I said that doesn’t fit.”
In the past, Allen has said that he wants to portray a conservative American on screen in a sitcom. However, he’s also said that he also doesn’t want “Last Man Standing” to be a completely political show, but rather a comedy about family.

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The Benefits of Laughing in the Office

Daniel Viñé Garcia/Getty Images While on an investor tour in Europe, I ended a busy day by joining my boss at a nice restaurant. After he said something funny, I responded in my typical style — throwing back my head and letting out hearty, unabashed laughter. People were taken aback. They turned to stare at me.
I asked my red-faced boss whether my laughter had embarrassed him. “It is pretty loud,” he muttered under his breath.
Later that evening, I castigated myself. I lay awake, wondering how many other times my laugh might have caused discomfort in professional situations. Should I try to mute it? Should I give up my executive position and transfer back to sales, which had a more jovial atmosphere? Should I find a new job?
By sunrise, I made a decision: I loved to laugh. I’d keep it and my job. I’d stay true to my authentic self.
It worked out. Now that I was conscious of my laugh, I looked out for what impact it had. I discovered that it did not impede my advancements. In fact, it became part of my signature. When I returned from vacations, colleagues told me they’d missed it.
Our offices had needed a good dose of laughter. And my decision not to rein it in helped. It was something people looked forward to each day.
It turns out that a series of studies shows the positive impact humor can have in the office. “According to research from institutions as serious as Wharton, MIT, and London Business School, every chuckle or guffaw brings with it a host of business benefits,” writes Alison Beard in the HBR article, “ Leading with Humor .” “Laughter relieves stress and boredom, boosts engagement and well-being, and spurs not only creativity and collaboration but also analytic precision and productivity.” Harvard Business School professor Alison Wood Brooks has also found that cracking jokes at work can make people seem more competent.
What about being on the receiving end of a joke, and laughing heartily? That too can bring a world of benefits to your employees. “When you start to laugh, it doesn’t just lighten your load mentally, it actually induces physical changes in your body,” the Mayo Clinic explains . It enhances your intake of “oxygen-rich air,” increasing your brain’s release of endorphins. It “can also stimulate circulation and aid muscle relaxation, both of which can help reduce some of the physical symptoms of stress.”
The Mayo Clinic even praises a howl like mine. “A rollicking laugh fires up and then cools down your stress response, and it can increase your heart rate and blood pressure. The result? A good, relaxed feeling.”
Given all the research showing that lower stress benefits employees and reduces absenteeism, the freedom to laugh seems not just good, but necessary at work. A group of researchers even found that after watching a comedy clip, employees were 10% more productive than their counterparts.
Of course, there can be downsides to too much humor — or too much laughter. For example, leaders who tease staff members or tell dirty jokes can pave the way for other employees to behave badly . And Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter notes that numerical minorities in professional situations, such as a woman with a group of men, may feel pressured to laugh at jokes that demean the minority. “The price of that kind of acceptance is decreased respect for everyone in” the minority category, she says.
But within the bounds of decency, laughter on the whole is a good thing, and the benefits far outweigh the risks.
My advice: Let your laugh fly free. Not all day, every day of course. It’s always good to be conscious of the volume within your environment, and to avoid distracting colleagues. But as Harvard Medical School professor Carl Marci notes , “Laughter is a social signal among humans. It’s like a punctuation mark.”
Sometimes in the midst of a stressful day, it’s helpful to be the exclamation point.

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Tim Allen: I Love Poking At Liberals’ ‘Small Window of Sense of Humor’

Tim Allen: I Love Poking At Liberals’ ‘Small Window of Sense of Humor’ ABC 18 Nov 2018 Tim Allen, the star of the hit Fox show Last Man Standing , said in a recent interview he enjoys making fun of progressives’ insecurities and insisted there is nothing that pisses people off more than a funny conservative.
“I like to mess around because I’ve been a standup fiery comic for 30 years. And I like pissing people off, and I said there’s nothing, especially in this area, that pisses people off more than a very funny conservative,” Allen told Indie Wire. “A smart, funny conservative that takes shots and is certainly self-effacing.”
“The left-wing point of view is so pervasive that they don’t even realize it’s a point of view. It is just a point of view. I think this character likes that, he likes to have another point of view,” Allen added in regards to his character on the show.
People often perceive Allen’s character, Mike Baxter, as sharing his real-world views but the veteran TV star says he is not the sum of his latest character.
“I did an interview and I said, ‘Are you asking Mike Baxter this question because you heard something about the Clintons that the writers had written?’ Now, I’ll put something behind it, because I think it’s funny to make fun of people that are full of themselves,” Allen stated. “Liberals have a very small window of sense of humor about themselves, so I love poking at it.”
“Two years ago, it was the conservatives, or whatever it is. But right now liberals, particularly progressives, hide behind large concepts,” Allen explained. “If you don’t agree with them, if you don’t agree with that position, then you hate women, and you hate gay people, and you hate pro-choice people, whatever. And I said that doesn’t fit. But I like pushing that and sometimes these guys let Mike Baxter say it, and he’s more of a pragmatist. He reminds me of my grandmother. He just hates big government.”
Allen also mentioned President Donald Trump’s recent exchange with CNN’s Jim Acosta, saying it was “unpleasant” to watch.
“It was so unpleasant to watch on both sides, that the guy wouldn’t leave him alone, where did the sense of decorum go?” Allen asked.
Concluding the extensive interview , Allen reminded everyone his job is to make people laugh, no matter how they feel about the Trump Administration.
“I can’t remember what comedian said it, but comedy’s about surprise. And there’s no surprise anymore. I know you hate the current administration. I know there’s hate, venom, we’re all going to hell, and the world’s all racist. I’ve heard this so much there’s no surprise, there’s no joke, there’s no drama,” Allen explained. “We’re writing a sitcom, we’re not trying to change the world. We’re just having an enjoyable time. Our job is to make you laugh.”
In May, it was announced that Last Man Standing would return to television on Fox after the successful six-season series was abruptly canceled by ABC late last year.
The show received astounding ratings when it returned in September, season 7 premiering to an average of 8 million viewers in the 18-49 demo.
Follow Kyle on Twitter @RealKyleMorris .
Entertainment Donald Trump Jim Acosta Last Man Standing Tim Allen

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