Greeley pizzeria’s Thanksgiving smallpox ad spurs outrage, disgust, demands for public discussion – The Denver Post

A Greeley pizzeria put out an ad in a magazine that refers to the genocidal deaths of Native Americans — and is facing an outcry.
The ad that Right Coast Pizza placed in the November issue of BandWagon — a Greeley-based music, arts and entertainment publication — shows a woman holding a pizza box in front of a kneeling native man wearing a headdress. The ad shows the woman saying: “Sorry about all the smallpox. ….. Who wants a slice of pepperoni?”
Right Coast owner Justin Vogel on Sunday evening said he was trying to prevent circulation of the ad after he and Right Coast employees received phone calls and electronic messages lambasting their conduct. BandWagon’s electronic versions of the ad have been removed.
Vogel was trying not to be delinquent in minimizing circulation of print versions of the magazine, he said, and planned to meet Monday morning with BandWagon’s publisher.
“I don’t know if the right term is ‘racist.’ It is definitely not correct. It is, basically, making light of genocide. It is coarse and inappropriate,” said Vogel, 32, who has owned this pizzeria in central Greeley for 3 1/2 years and also owns one in Wheat Ridge.
“I take full responsibility. … We screwed up. How can we make this right?”
Smallpox ranked among the most destructive diseases brought by European settlers. Scholars are exploring the extent to which smallpox was used as a biological weapon before settlers displaced, forcibly removed and in some cases slaughtered native communities.
The magazine’s website says it circulates for free to Greeley, Fort Collins, Loveland, Windsor and more. Vogel said he’d put ads in BandWagon before and that, when BandWagon sales reps contacted him about what sort of ad he wanted for November, he told them to “get creative and come up with something.”
The BandWagon staffers suggested a “Thanksgiving theme” and Vogel said he told them that sounded fine. When BandWagon designers sent the ad for him to review before publication, Vogel was busy, he said, and didn’t look at it carefully.
Messages sent to Right Coast — including some from a native community estimated at 1,500 strong — criticized the ad as deeply offensive. Some people said they’ll stay away.
Northern Colorado Latino Foundation board president Joe Molina was organizing a public forum Monday at 7 p.m. at his gallery in Greeley. “We would like to take the time to discuss the recent cultural insensitivity of both a local restaurant chain Right Coast Pizza and the very public racist ad they placed in BandWagon Magazine in Greeley,” Molina announced in a Facebook post.
Related Articles Utah Navajos could tip balance after voting-rights battle Noah Smith: Fix affirmative action before its enemies kill it “We are saddened by the privilege of Right Coast Pizza in turning the genocide of Native Americans into a very inappropriate display of derogatory humor. We ask that BandWagon Magazine publisher take this experience seriously and acknowledge their mistake.”
BandWagon’s publisher issued an apology using Facebook “to anyone that was offended by one of our ads,” saying “those of you who responded so strongly to that ad are a part of the same community that we are, and your voices are valid.” The apology statement said the ad is “insensitive,” that “both the magazine and our clients regret ever printing it,” and that “the creative team behind this advertisement went too far and both the client and our publisher deeply regret our lack of quality control in letting this go to print.”
Right Coast is considering what to do, said Vogel, who discussed the matter in two phone calls with people who identified themselves as Native Americans. He was considering contacting community groups and charities, he said.
“We never intended any harm. … We don’t want to make it a spur of the moment thing. We need to take our time and make it right.”

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This funny Mom sends kids to school with ‘passive aggressive lunch bag’ notes

Nov. 19, 2018 / 7:30 PM GMT / Source: TODAY By Terri Peters Getting kids out the door for school in the morning is enough to drive any parent crazy. But Whitney Cicero, who has a 14-year-old daughter and 12-year-old son, has found a unique way to relieve the stress brought on by the morning rush using a paper lunch bag and a marker.
Cicero, who blogs and creates videos at The New Stepford , recently began writing what she calls “passive aggressive lunch bags” for her kids after her own internal dialogue seemed too funny not to share.
Cicero began creating funny “passive aggressive lunch bags” as a way to joke with her 14 and 12 year old kids. Whitney Cicero “Fortnite is not a career choice,” reads one lunch bag.
“Just pretend it’s Chipotle,” says another.
Cicero says her teenage daughter encouraged her to share photos of the bags on Instagram after her high school classmates began asking to see her lunch bag every day. Since then, the Southern California mom has started selling the bags to followers on her Facebook page and website , even offering to personalize the notes if buyers tell her a bit about their own children.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BpzhOa3lb5Z
https://www.instagram.com/p/BqUx4AgFx_U
https://www.instagram.com/p/BqXhxx1Fr_Z
https://www.instagram.com/p/BqK4LQPF21E
“I hope everyone gets their kids a pack for their stockings,” joked Cicero.
Cicero says her kids know she’s mostly kidding with her lunch bag messages, and credits having a sense of humor with making parenting teens seem a bit easier.
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“It’s imperative to have humor with your kids,” Cicero told TODAY Parents. “We joke about everything — sex, drugs, politics, their bodies — I don’t want them to think anything is taboo. Humor is a great segue into having meaningful conversations and it helps break the tension of things that can be kind of awkward. And, if we don’t have a sense of humor about parenting, we will literally lose our minds.”

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Restaurant patron arrested for allegedly threatening to ‘blow up’ eatery’s bathroom claims he only meant he had to defecate

Restaurants Published 19 hours ago Restaurant patron arrested for allegedly threatening to ‘blow up’ eatery’s bathroom claims he only meant he had to defecate By Michael Bartiromo | Fox News Facebook Twitter Flipboard Comments Print Email
Arthur Posey, 30, was at Willie’s Chicken Shack on Nov. 13 when employees say he got into a heated argument with staff. (Orleans Justice Center jail)
Toilet humor isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, but people don’t usually get arrested for it.
Such was not the case last Sunday, after a 30-year-old man in a New Orleans restaurant allegedly threatened to blow up the establishment, even though the customer claimed he merely meant he was going “blow up the bathroom” by evacuating his bowels with extreme gusto.
PICS: CHICK-FIL-A GAVE THIS GUY FREE FOOD FOR LIFE
Arthur Posey, 30, was at Willie’s Chicken Shack on Nov. 13 when employees say he got into a heated argument with staff and threatened to come back with a “bomb,” according to The Times-Picayune .
A worker said Posey didn't mention anything about the bathroom at the time of the alleged threats.
Employees at Willie’s Chicken Shack, located in New Orleans’ French Quarter, say Posey had gotten into an argument with staff prior to making the alleged threats. (Google)
Police found Posey at a different establishment a block over, where he claimed he hadn’t actually issued any threats, and was only describing his gastrointestinal intentions in the Willie’s Chicken Shack restroom.
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Police charged him with two counts of communicating false information of planned arson. Posey will also need to appear in court on Nov. 29 for a competency hearing.

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